2

I am trying to format this line:

print("{0:5} {1:5} {2:5} £{3:5} £{4:5}".format(GTIN,product,Quantity,indprice,finprice,))

however, it gives me an output of, with the pound sign separate from the 20.:

46389121 chicken 2     £10.00 £   20

I want there to be 5 spaces between each variable, like this:

46389121     chicken     2     £10.00     £20

Can someone spot my stupid mistake in my formatting?

EDIT:

print("{}   {}   {}   £{}   £{}".format(GTIN,product,Quantity,indprice,finprice))


346389121   chicken   345435435   £10.00   £3454354350
46389121   chicken   2   £10.00   £20
46389121   chicken   2   £10.00   £20
46389121   chicken   23213213   £10.00   £232132130

when I try much bigger numbers , they do not aline.

2
  • When you're ready to do more advanced formatting, curses is the bomb for this kind of thing. This guide helped me a lot: docs.python.org/dev/howto/curses.html Dec 29, 2016 at 18:40
  • 1
    If you want five space between variables, use five spaces. What you're doing is setting minimum field widths and a single manual space, which will only produce five spaces if the field is formatted to a length 1 string. Dec 29, 2016 at 18:48

3 Answers 3

1

Just put the spaces in the format string

`{}     {}     {}     £{}     £{}`.format(GTIN,product,Quantity,indprice,finprice)
2
  • @Jospeh.MCS if you want them to line up, then you don't want them to be separated by exactly five spaces. Instead, you want them to each have a certain width '{:<10} {:<10} {:<10} £{:<10} £{:<10}' Read more about the format spec here docs.python.org/3.4/library/string.html#formatspec Dec 29, 2016 at 19:34
  • Huge thanks! I'll bookmark the format spec for future ;)
    – Jospeh.MCS
    Dec 29, 2016 at 19:50
1

You should put a "<" sign before the number of spaces. By default python uses ">" as the alignment for numbers which adds space or the fill symbol to the left of the number. The symbol "<" adds the space to the right of the number, which is want you need

print("{0:<5} {1:<5} {2:<5} £{3:<5} £{4:<5}".format(1, 2, 3, 5, 20))
>> 1     2     3     £5     £20

print("{0:5} {1:5} {2:5} £{3:5} £{4:5}".format(1, 2, 3, 5, 20))
>>    1     2     3 £    5 £   20
1

or format your individual strings first, then str.join them:

GTIN = 46389121
product = 'chicken'
Quantity = 2
indprice = 10.00
finprice = 20.00

strgs = [str(GTIN), product, str(Quantity), '£{:.2f}'.format(indprice),
         '£{:.2f}'.format(indprice)]
print((5*' ').join(strgs))

that way you can easily change the number of spaces between the individual strings.

note that ':5'.format(...) may mess your desired formatting up. 5 is here the minimal space reserved for your input; if your input is shorter you will get more spaces between your data. if it is longer, everything is ok in your case.

you could also 'construct' the format string fist and then fill it (which amounts to the same as Patrick Haugh's answer):

fmt = (5*' ').join(('{}', '{}', '{}', '£{:.2f}', '£{:.2f}'))
print(fmt.format(GTIN,product,Quantity,indprice,finprice))
1
  • @Jospeh.MCS: f is for floating point and a.b before that means a total characters (including the decimal point), b decimal places. if a is omitted no space is 'reserved'; the integer part of your number will be written before the . (and probably mess up your layout). Dec 29, 2016 at 19:11

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