A palindrome is a word, phrase, number or other sequence of units that can be read the same way in either direction.

To check whether a word is a palindrome I get the char array of the word and compare the chars. I tested it and it seems to work. However I want to know if it is right or if there is something to improve.

Here is my code:

public class Aufg1 {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String wort = "reliefpfpfeiller";
        char[] warray = wort.toCharArray(); 
        System.out.println(istPalindrom(warray));       
    }

    public static boolean istPalindrom(char[] wort){
        boolean palindrom = false;
        if(wort.length%2 == 0){
            for(int i = 0; i < wort.length/2-1; i++){
                if(wort[i] != wort[wort.length-i-1]){
                    return false;
                }else{
                    palindrom = true;
                }
            }
        }else{
            for(int i = 0; i < (wort.length-1)/2-1; i++){
                if(wort[i] != wort[wort.length-i-1]){
                    return false;
                }else{
                    palindrom = true;
                }
            }
        }
        return palindrom;
    }
}
  • 3
    Not sure if this is intentional but the string in your example - reliefpfpfeiller - isn't a palindrome – barrowc Nov 10 '10 at 1:47

33 Answers 33

up vote 160 down vote accepted

Why not just:

public static boolean istPalindrom(char[] word){
    int i1 = 0;
    int i2 = word.length - 1;
    while (i2 > i1) {
        if (word[i1] != word[i2]) {
            return false;
        }
        ++i1;
        --i2;
    }
    return true;
}

Example:

Input is "andna".
i1 will be 0 and i2 will be 4.

First loop iteration we will compare word[0] and word[4]. They're equal, so we increment i1 (it's now 1) and decrement i2 (it's now 3).
So we then compare the n's. They're equal, so we increment i1 (it's now 2) and decrement i2 (it's 2).
Now i1 and i2 are equal (they're both 2), so the condition for the while loop is no longer true so the loop terminates and we return true.

  • 1
    instead of pre increment (++i1 and --i2), we can also use post increment (i1++, i2--)result is same i think ! – user0946076422 Aug 15 '15 at 3:44
  • @user0946076422 Yes. I too felt that way. Would be great if OP has a different explanation. – Vijay Tholpadi Mar 10 '17 at 3:11
  • 1
    @Vijay Tholpadi - It's just really a coding preference more than anything else. Post increment would accomplish same result in this particular example, but I always use pre increment unless there's a specific reason not to. – dcp Mar 15 '17 at 12:44

You can check if a string is a palindrome by comparing it to the reverse of itself:

public static boolean isPalindrome(String str) {
    return str.equals(new StringBuilder(str).reverse().toString());
}

or for versions of Java earlier than 1.5,

public static boolean isPalindrome(String str) {
    return str.equals(new StringBuffer().append(str).reverse().toString());
}

EDIT: @FernandoPelliccioni provided a very thorough analysis of the efficiency (or lack thereof) of this solution, both in terms of time and space. If you're interested in the computational complexity of this and other possible solutions to this question, please read it!

  • 10
    Compare the complexity of your algorithm with respect to others. – Fernando Pelliccioni Feb 3 '14 at 14:24
  • 2
    @FernandoPelliccioni, I think it's the same complexity as the other solutions, no? – aioobe Aug 23 '15 at 8:16
  • 1
    @Fernando, as far as I can tell all answers have a linear complexity. Because of this there's no way to give a definitive answer to which solution is most efficient. You could run benchmarks but they would be specific for a particular JVM and JRE. Best of luck with your blog post. Looking forward to reading it. – aioobe Aug 26 '15 at 21:24
  • 14
    Here my analysis: componentsprogramming.com/palindromes – Fernando Pelliccioni Jun 6 '16 at 21:09
  • 1
    @FernandoPelliccioni nice analysis – Saravana Jul 12 '16 at 4:11

A concise version, that doesn't involve (inefficiently) initializing a bunch of objects:

boolean isPalindrome(String str) {    
    int n = str.length();
    for( int i = 0; i < n/2; i++ )
        if (str.charAt(i) != str.charAt(n-i-1)) return false;
    return true;    
}

Alternatively, recursion.

For anybody who is looking for a shorter recursive solution, to check if a given string satisfies as a palindrome:

private boolean isPalindrome(String s) {
    int length = s.length();

    if (length < 2) // If the string only has 1 char or is empty
        return true;
    else {
        // Check opposite ends of the string for equality
        if (s.charAt(0) != s.charAt(length - 1))
            return false;
        // Function call for string with the two ends snipped off
        else
            return isPalindrome(s.substring(1, length - 1));
    }
}

OR even shorter, if you'd like:

private boolean isPalindrome(String s) {
    int length = s.length();
    if (length < 2) return true;
    else return s.charAt(0) != s.charAt(length - 1) ? false :
            isPalindrome(s.substring(1, length - 1));
}
  • 2
    Nice code, recursion makes it really easy and less lines on code. – Akash5288 Jan 31 '17 at 6:35
  • the shorter version can be simplified: return s.charAt(0) == s.charAt(l - 1) && isPalindrome(s.substring(1, l - 1)); – vault Apr 19 at 23:05

Go, Java:

public boolean isPalindrome (String word) {
    String myWord = word.replaceAll("\\s+","");
    String reverse = new StringBuffer(myWord).reverse().toString();
    return reverse.equalsIgnoreCase(myWord);
}

isPalindrome("Never Odd or Even"); // True
isPalindrome("Never Odd or Even1"); // False
public class Aufg1 {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
         String wort = "reliefpfpfeiller";
         char[] warray = wort.toCharArray(); 
         System.out.println(istPalindrom(warray));       
    }

    public static boolean istPalindrom(char[] wort){
        if(wort.length%2 == 0){
            for(int i = 0; i < wort.length/2-1; i++){
                if(wort[i] != wort[wort.length-i-1]){
                    return false;
                }
            }
        }else{
            for(int i = 0; i < (wort.length-1)/2-1; i++){
                if(wort[i] != wort[wort.length-i-1]){
                    return false;
                }
            }
        }
        return true;
    }
}
  • 2
    simplified a bit. but I like dcp's answer! – Casey Nov 9 '10 at 21:36

also a different looking solution:

public static boolean isPalindrome(String s) {

        for (int i=0 , j=s.length()-1 ; i<j ; i++ , j-- ) {

            if ( s.charAt(i) != s.charAt(j) ) {
                return false;
            }
        }

        return true;
    }

And here a complete Java 8 streaming solution. An IntStream provides all indexes til strings half length and then a comparision from the start and from the end is done.

public static void main(String[] args) {
    for (String testStr : Arrays.asList("testset", "none", "andna", "haah", "habh", "haaah")) {
        System.out.println("testing " + testStr + " is palindrome=" + isPalindrome(testStr));
    }
}

public static boolean isPalindrome(String str) {
    return IntStream.range(0, str.length() / 2)
            .noneMatch(i -> str.charAt(i) != str.charAt(str.length() - i - 1));
}

Output is:

testing testset is palindrome=true
testing none is palindrome=false
testing andna is palindrome=true
testing haah is palindrome=true
testing habh is palindrome=false
testing haaah is palindrome=true
  • Why not allMatch with allMatch(i -> str.charAt(i) == str.charAt(str.length() - i - 1)) ? – gil.fernandes Apr 5 at 9:47

Checking palindrome for first half of the string with the rest, this case assumes removal of any white spaces.

public int isPalindrome(String a) {
        //Remove all spaces and non alpha characters
        String ab = a.replaceAll("[^A-Za-z0-9]", "").toLowerCase();
        //System.out.println(ab);

        for (int i=0; i<ab.length()/2; i++) {
            if(ab.charAt(i) != ab.charAt((ab.length()-1)-i)) {
                return 0;
            }
        }   
        return 1;
    }
public class palindrome {
public static void main(String[] args) {
    StringBuffer strBuf1 = new StringBuffer("malayalam");
    StringBuffer strBuf2 = new StringBuffer("malayalam");
    strBuf2.reverse();


    System.out.println(strBuf2);
    System.out.println((strBuf1.toString()).equals(strBuf2.toString()));
    if ((strBuf1.toString()).equals(strBuf2.toString()))
        System.out.println("palindrome");
    else
        System.out.println("not a palindrome");
}

}

I worked on a solution for a question that was marked as duplicate of this one. Might as well throw it here...

The question requested a single line to solve this, and I took it more as the literary palindrome - so spaces, punctuation and upper/lower case can throw off the result.

Here's the ugly solution with a small test class:

public class Palindrome {
   public static boolean isPalendrome(String arg) {
         return arg.replaceAll("[^A-Za-z]", "").equalsIgnoreCase(new StringBuilder(arg).reverse().toString().replaceAll("[^A-Za-z]", ""));
   }
   public static void main(String[] args) {
      System.out.println(isPalendrome("hiya"));
      System.out.println(isPalendrome("star buttons not tub rats"));
      System.out.println(isPalendrome("stab nail at ill Italian bats!"));
      return;
   }
}

Sorry that it is kind of nasty - but the other question specified a one-liner.

  • 1
    Just curious, why the ternary operator at the end? – typingduck Apr 17 '17 at 16:24
  • Absolutely nothing - I must not have had my coffee. Will fix my response - thanks!. – Marc May 24 '17 at 15:51

Amazing how many different solutions to such a simple problem exist! Here's another one.

private static boolean palindrome(String s){
    String revS = "";
    String checkS = s.toLowerCase();
    String[] checkSArr = checkS.split("");

    for(String e : checkSArr){
        revS = e + revS;
    }

    return (checkS.equals(revS)) ? true : false;
}

Try this out :

import java.util.*;
    public class str {

        public static void main(String args[])
        {
          Scanner in=new Scanner(System.in);
          System.out.println("ENTER YOUR STRING: ");
          String a=in.nextLine();
          System.out.println("GIVEN STRING IS: "+a);
          StringBuffer str=new StringBuffer(a);
          StringBuffer str2=new StringBuffer(str.reverse());
          String s2=new String(str2);
          System.out.println("THE REVERSED STRING IS: "+str2);
            if(a.equals(s2))    
                System.out.println("ITS A PALINDROME");
            else
                System.out.println("ITS NOT A PALINDROME");
            }
    }

I'm new to java and I'm taking up your question as a challenge to improve my knowledge.

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class PalindromeRecursiveBoolean {

    public static boolean isPalindrome(String str) {

        str = str.toUpperCase();
        char[] strChars = str.toCharArray();

        List<Character> word = new ArrayList<>();
        for (char c : strChars) {
            word.add(c);
        }

        while (true) {
            if ((word.size() == 1) || (word.size() == 0)) {
                return true;
            }
            if (word.get(0) == word.get(word.size() - 1)) {
                word.remove(0);
                word.remove(word.size() - 1);
            } else {
                return false;

            }

        }
    }
}
  1. If the string is made of no letters or just one letter, it is a palindrome.
  2. Otherwise, compare the first and last letters of the string.
    • If the first and last letters differ, then the string is not a palindrome
    • Otherwise, the first and last letters are the same. Strip them from the string, and determine whether the string that remains is a palindrome. Take the answer for this smaller string and use it as the answer for the original string then repeat from 1.
public boolean isPalindrome(String abc){
    if(abc != null && abc.length() > 0){
        char[] arr = abc.toCharArray();
        for (int i = 0; i < arr.length/2; i++) {
            if(arr[i] != arr[arr.length - 1 - i]){
                return false;
            }
        }
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

Another way is using char Array

public class Palindrome {

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String str = "madam";
    if(isPalindrome(str)) {
        System.out.println("Palindrome");
    } else {
        System.out.println("Not a Palindrome");
    }
}

private static boolean isPalindrome(String str) {
    // Convert String to char array
    char[] charArray = str.toCharArray();  
    for(int i=0; i < str.length(); i++) {
        if(charArray[i] != charArray[(str.length()-1) - i]) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

}

  • 1
    This approach is excellent. Time Complexity O(n), space Complexity O(1) – kanaparthikiran Jan 1 at 4:06

Here my analysis of the @Greg answer: componentsprogramming.com/palindromes


Sidenote: But, for me it is important to do it in a Generic way. The requirements are that the sequence is bidirectionally iterable and the elements of the sequence are comparables using equality. I don't know how to do it in Java, but, here is a C++ version, I don't know a better way to do it for bidirectional sequences.

template <BidirectionalIterator I> 
    requires( EqualityComparable< ValueType<I> > ) 
bool palindrome( I first, I last ) 
{ 
    I m = middle(first, last); 
    auto rfirst = boost::make_reverse_iterator(last); 
    return std::equal(first, m, rfirst); 
} 

Complexity: linear-time,

  • If I is RandomAccessIterator: floor(n/2) comparissons and floor(n/2)*2 iterations

  • If I is BidirectionalIterator: floor(n/2) comparissons and floor(n/2)*2 iterations plus (3/2)*n iterations to find the middle ( middle function )

  • storage: O(1)

  • No dymamic allocated memory


Recently I wrote a palindrome program which doesn't use StringBuilder. A late answer but this might come in handy to some people.

public boolean isPalindrome(String value) {
    boolean isPalindrome = true;
    for (int i = 0 , j = value.length() - 1 ; i < j ; i ++ , j --) {
        if (value.charAt(i) != value.charAt(j)) {
            isPalindrome = false;
        }
    }
    return isPalindrome;
}

Using stack, it can be done like this

import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;
import java.text.*;
import java.math.*;
import java.util.regex.*;
import java.util.*;

public class Solution {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
        String str=in.nextLine();
        str.replaceAll("\\s+","");
        //System.out.println(str);
        Stack<String> stack=new Stack<String>();
        stack.push(str);
        String str_rev=stack.pop();
        if(str.equals(str_rev)){
            System.out.println("Palindrome"); 
        }else{
             System.out.println("Not Palindrome");
        }
    }
}
  • thanks! can you explain the code ?? – rockyBalboa Apr 28 '17 at 11:14
  • as you must be knowing that, stack is of LIFO type that means you are basically pushing data through the beginning of the stack and retrieving data from the end of stack using pop(). Hope this helps! – aayushi May 16 '17 at 19:42
 public static boolean isPalindrome(String word) {
    String str = "";
    for (int i=word.length()-1; i>=0;  i--){
        str = str + word.charAt(i);
    }
   if(str.equalsIgnoreCase(word)){
       return true;
   }else{
       return false;
   }

}
import java.util.Scanner;


public class Palindrom {

    public static void main(String []args)
    {
        Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
        String str= in.nextLine();
        int x= str.length();

        if(x%2!=0)
        {
            for(int i=0;i<x/2;i++)
            {

                if(str.charAt(i)==str.charAt(x-1-i))
                {
                    continue;
                }
                else 
                {
                    System.out.println("String is not a palindrom");
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
        else
        {
            for(int i=0;i<=x/2;i++)
            {
                if(str.charAt(i)==str.charAt(x-1-i))
                {
                    continue;
                }
                else 
                {
                    System.out.println("String is not a palindrom");
                    break;
                }

            }
        }
    }

}
private static boolean isPalindrome(String word) {

        int z = word.length();
        boolean isPalindrome = false;

        for (int i = 0; i <= word.length() / 2; i++) {
            if (word.charAt(i) == word.charAt(--z)) {
                isPalindrome = true;
            }
        }

        return isPalindrome;
    }

I was looking for a solution that not only worked for palindromes like...

  • "Kayak"
  • "Madam"

...but as well for...

  • "A man, a plan, a canal, Panama!"
  • "Was it a car or a cat I saw?"
  • "No 'x' in Nixon"

Iterative: This has be proven as a good solution.

private boolean isPalindromeIterative(final String string)
    {
        final char[] characters =
            string.replaceAll("[\\W]", "").toLowerCase().toCharArray();

        int iteratorLeft = 0;
        int iteratorEnd = characters.length - 1;

        while (iteratorEnd > iteratorLeft)
        {
            if (characters[iteratorLeft++] != characters[iteratorEnd--])
            {
                return false;
            }
        }

        return true;
    }

Recursive. I think this solution shouldn't be much worse than the iterative one. Is a little bit crapy we need to extract the cleaning step out of the method to avoid unnecesary procesing.

private boolean isPalindromeRecursive(final String string)
        {
            final String cleanString = string.replaceAll("[\\W]", "").toLowerCase();
            return isPalindromeRecursiveRecursion(cleanString);
        }

private boolean isPalindromeRecursiveRecursion(final String cleanString)
        {
            final int cleanStringLength = cleanString.length();

            return cleanStringLength <= 1 || cleanString.charAt(0) ==
                       cleanString.charAt(cleanStringLength - 1) &&
                       isPalindromeRecursiveRecursion  
                           (cleanString.substring(1, cleanStringLength - 1));
        }

Reversing: This has been proved as a expensive solution.

private boolean isPalindromeReversing(final String string)
    {
        final String cleanString = string.replaceAll("[\\W]", "").toLowerCase();
        return cleanString.equals(new StringBuilder(cleanString).reverse().toString());
    }

All the credits to the guys answering in this post and bringing light to the topic.

Considering not letters in the words

public static boolean palindromeWords(String s ){

        int left=0;
        int right=s.length()-1;

        while(left<=right){

            while(left<right && !Character.isLetter(s.charAt(left))){
                left++;
            }
            while(right>0 && !Character.isLetter(s.charAt(right))){
                right--;
            }

            if((s.charAt(left++))!=(s.charAt(right--))){
                return false;
            }
        }
        return true;
    }

———

@Test
public void testPalindromeWords(){
    assertTrue(StringExercise.palindromeWords("ece"));
    assertTrue(StringExercise.palindromeWords("kavak"));
    assertFalse(StringExercise.palindromeWords("kavakdf"));
    assertTrue(StringExercise.palindromeWords("akka"));
    assertTrue(StringExercise.palindromeWords("??e@@c_--e"));
}

Here you can check palindrome a number of String dynamically

import java.util.Scanner;

public class Checkpalindrome {
 public static void main(String args[]) {
  String original, reverse = "";
  Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
  System.out.println("Enter How Many number of Input you want : ");
  int numOfInt = in.nextInt();
  original = in.nextLine();
do {
  if (numOfInt == 0) {
    System.out.println("Your Input Conplete");
   } 
  else {
    System.out.println("Enter a string to check palindrome");
    original = in.nextLine();

    StringBuffer buffer = new StringBuffer(original);
    reverse = buffer.reverse().toString();

  if (original.equalsIgnoreCase(reverse)) {
    System.out.println("The entered string is Palindrome:"+reverse);
   } 
  else {
    System.out.println("The entered string is not Palindrome:"+reverse);
    }
 }
   numOfInt--;
    } while (numOfInt >= 0);
}
}

IMO, the recursive way is the simplest and clearest.

public static boolean isPal(String s)
{   
    if(s.length() == 0 || s.length() == 1)
        return true; 
    if(s.charAt(0) == s.charAt(s.length()-1))
       return isPal(s.substring(1, s.length()-1));                
   return false;
}

here, checking for the largest palindrome in a string, always starting from 1st char.

public static String largestPalindromeInString(String in) {
    int right = in.length() - 1;
    int left = 0;
    char[] word = in.toCharArray();
    while (right > left && word[right] != word[left]) {
        right--;
    }
    int lenght = right + 1;
    while (right > left && word[right] == word[left]) {

        left++;
        right--;

    }
    if (0 >= right - left) {
        return new String(Arrays.copyOf(word, lenght ));
    } else {
        return largestPalindromeInString(
                new String(Arrays.copyOf(word, in.length() - 1)));
    }
}

Code Snippet:

import java.util.Scanner;

 class main
 {
    public static void main(String []args)
    {
       Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
       String str = sc.next();
       String reverse = new StringBuffer(str).reverse().toString();

        if(str.equals(reverse))
            System.out.println("Pallindrome");
        else
            System.out.println("Not Pallindrome");
     }
}

enter image description here

import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.Scanner;
import java.util.Set;

public class GetAllPalindromes 
{
    static Scanner in;

    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        in = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.println("Enter a string \n");
        String abc = in.nextLine();
        Set a = printAllPalindromes(abc);
        System.out.println("set is   " + a);
    }

    public static Set<CharSequence> printAllPalindromes(String input) 
    {
        if (input.length() <= 2) {
            return Collections.emptySet();
        }

        Set<CharSequence> out = new HashSet<CharSequence>();
        int length = input.length();

        for (int i = 1; i < length - 1; i++) 
        {
            for (int j = i - 1, k = i + 1; j >= 0 && k < length; j--, k++) 
            {
                if (input.charAt(j) == input.charAt(k)) {
                    out.add(input.subSequence(j, k + 1));
                } else {
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
        return out;
    }
}

**Get All Palindrome in s given string**

Output D:\Java>java GetAllPalindromes Enter a string

Hello user nitin is my best friend wow !

Answer is set is [nitin, nitin , wow , wow, iti]

D:\Java>

For-loop contains sub.length() / 2 - 1 . It has to be subtracted with 1 as the element in the middle of the string does not have to checked.

For example, if we have to check an string with 7 chars (1234567), then 7/2 => 3 and then we subtrack 1, and so the positions in the string will become (0123456). The chars checked with be the 0, 1, 2 element with the 6, 5, 4 respectively. We do not care about the element at the position 3 as it is in the exact middle of the string.

 private boolean isPalindromic(String sub) {
        for (int i = 0; i <= sub.length() / 2 - 1; i++) {
            if (sub.charAt(i) != sub.charAt(sub.length() - 1 - i)) {
                return false;
            }
        }
        return true;
    }

protected by Community Apr 7 '13 at 17:01

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