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I am working on a project involving PyQt5, and I am struggling with managing inheritance between widgets.

I have one QWidget screen that inherits off QtWidgets.QWidget and another class which is generated by QtDesigner. It reads something like this:

class a(QtWidgets.QWidget, Ui_a):
    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        QtWidgets.QWidget.__init__(self, parent)
        self.setupUi(self)

        <some attributes>

    <some functions

Here, I inherit off Ui_a, a separate class stored in a generated file, and I can call setupUi (a method of Ui_a) fine.

I now want to create another class b, which also is a QWidget that needs to be displayed. This class b requires the use of some of the functions and attributes from class a. I can easily just copy paste the required stuff in but that is bad practice so I am looking for a more neat solution. If I do the code:

class b(QtWidgets.QWidget, Ui_b, a):
    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        QtWidgets.QWidget.__init(self, parent)
        self.setupUi(self)

This then crashes with an error message saying that it cannot create a consistent method resolution order.

My first question is - I know I need to call the init method of class a since a's attributes are created there, but I don't know how.

My second question is - How do I fix this MRO error and succeed in creating the new class b which can use a's attributes and functions?

5

You are trying to mix in the parent classes before the derived class. There is no need to, just inherit directly from a and the new Ui_b and nothing else:

class b(a, Ui_b):
    # *no* __init__ needed either

a already pulls in QtWidgets.QWidget.

Now, Ui_a and Ui_b may not play well together. You may have to invoke both Ui_a.setupUi() and Ui_b.setupUi(). You can do so explicitly:

class b(a, Ui_b):
    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        super().__init__(parent)
        # Ui_b.setupUi would have shadowed Ui_a.setupUi, so 
        # call the latter explicitly
        Ui_a.setupUi(self, self)  # unbound

It may be that Ui_a and Ui_b can't be mixed at all. In that case you should just pull out all the methods you want to re-use into a separate base class and have both a and b inherit from that:

class SharedStuff:
    # ...

class a(QtWidgets.QWidget, SharedStuff, Ui_a):
    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        QtWidgets.QWidget.__init__(self, parent)
        self.setupUi(self)

class b(QtWidgets.QWidget, SharedStuff, Ui_b):
    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        QtWidgets.QWidget.__init__(self, parent)
        self.setupUi(self)
  • Saying that "Ui_a and Ui_b may not play well together" is quite an understatement if they were both generated from qt designer files (which is where the setupUi method comes from). It is generally unsafe to call setupUi more than once with the same arguments (although it might still "work" through sheer dumb luck). – ekhumoro Dec 30 '16 at 21:00
  • @ekhumoro: I have 0 experience with qt, let alone with the auto-generated code. Added an alternative option. – Martijn Pieters Dec 30 '16 at 21:13
0

Your question is slightly unclear, but I am going to assume that Ui_a and Ui_b aren't both classes generated from Qt Designer files - because there is no sane way of inheriting from two such classes.

I'm guessing your current classes are equivalent to this:

class A(QtWidgets.QWidget, Ui_FromQtDesigner):
    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        QtWidgets.QWidget.__init__(self, parent)
        self.setupUi(self)

    def methodA(self):
        print('A:', self.windowTitle())

class B(QtWidgets.QWidget):
    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        QtWidgets.QWidget.__init__(self, parent)

    def methodB(self):
        print('B:', self.windowTitle())

and you want a class C which will be a QWidget subclass that gets both the Qt Designer UI elements and the custom methods from classes A and B.

Now, Qt uses single inheritance almost exclusively. Inheriting from two QWidget classes is usually an error, unless the classes share a common set of base-classes (and even then, there are a number of limitations that still make it a questionable design choice - for more details, see this blog post).

In your case, it would be better to use a simple mixin class. It is only really necessary for class A to inherit from QWidget, so the set of classes can be defined like this:

class WidgetA(QtWidgets.QWidget, Ui_FromQtDesigner):
    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        super(WidgetA, self).__init__(parent)
        self.setupUi(self)

    def methodA(self):
        print('A:', self.windowTitle())

class WidgetMixinB(object):
    def methodB(self):
        print('B:', self.windowTitle())

class WidgetC(WidgetA, WidgetMixinB):
    pass

And if you also want to use WidgetMixinB as a widget in its own right, you can create another class for it like this:

class WidgetB(QtWidgets.QWidget, WidgetMixinB):
    pass

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