2

We have a trivial c++ task to parse a big json file from an http endpoint and then copy the values to a custom local class instance. (In the code below the instance is obj with setters setField1, setField2, etc.)

This code is "simple," but the json response is huge and results in a very big c++ file that does the same thing. However, there are some things to consider, namely different type and setter method names. Below are 3 cases (an int, a bool, and a double), but my code contains this for at least 50 types. How can I modernize the code, make it less error-prone, and take fewer lines of code?

if ( item_[i].HasMember("field1") && item_[i]["field1"].IsDouble()) {

    double v =  item_[i]["field1"].GetDouble();
    if ( v < 0 )
        throw CustomException("field1 value invalid");

    obj.setField1(v);

} else {
    throw CustomException("field1 missing or wrong data type");
}

if ( item_[i].HasMember("field2") && item_[i]["field2"].IsBool()) {

    bool v =  item_[i]["field2"].GetBool();

    obj.setField2(v);

} else {
    throw CustomException("field2 missing or wrong data type");
}

if ( item_[i].HasMember("field3") && item_[i]["field3"].IsInt()) {

    int v =  item_[i]["field3"].GetInt();
    if ( v < 0 )
        throw CustomException("field3 value invalid");

    obj.setField3(v);

} else {
    throw CustomException("field3 missing or wrong data type");
}
  • 1
    Those IsInt, GetInt methods, do you have a chance to get them as Is<int> and Get<int> methods? Then it would be quite trivial. – nvoigt Dec 30 '16 at 14:26
  • That's because you cross-posted the same exact question without considering the requirements of Code Review. Stack Overflow is for generic questions; Code Review requires real code. – 200_success Dec 30 '16 at 14:27
  • What happens when you execute item_[i]["fieldName"] on an item that does not have that field ? One step further, what happens when calling GetBool() on a field that is not a bool ? I'd expect the answer to be "an exception" in both cases, then your code could be reduced to a series of obj.setFieldN(item_[i]["fieldN"].GetType());, wrapped inside a single try/catch to throw your custom exception. – Quentin Dec 30 '16 at 14:28
  • If your code works, you may want to post on CodeReview@StackExchange.com. Read their guidelines before posting. – Thomas Matthews Dec 30 '16 at 18:36
  • @ThomasMatthews protip: you can type [codereview.se] to render it as a link to Code Review ;-) – Mathieu Guindon Dec 30 '16 at 18:37
1

The most evil thing in this serialization code is, IMHO, a duplication and those string identifiers. Here I will post my C++ pseudocode two cents (I won't use setters, but this idea can be easily extended to use them). Sure thing, this solution may not fit into your code right from a get go, but this is just and outline of overall idea.

First of all, here is a declaration of some serializable object:

class TestObject : public JsonSerializable
{
public:

    TestObject()
    {
        // String field names are localized in a single place
        // Here we create some sort of mapping from JSON to
        // actual data.
        addField("bool", &m_bool);
        addField("int", &m_int);
        addField("string", &m_string);
    }

private:

    bool        m_bool
    int         m_int;
    std::string m_string;
};

Now let's define a JsonSerializable class that handles loading of an object from a JSON file:

class JsonSerializable
{
public:

    // This method iterates all registered fields
    // and tries to read them from a JSON
    void load(const Json& json)
    {
        for (const auto& kv : m_fields)
        {
            kv.second->set(json[kv.first]);
        }
    }

protected:

    // This method was used in a TestObject constructor
    template<typename TValue>
    void addField(const std::string& name, TValue* value)
    {
        m_fields[name] = new GenericField(value);
    }

private:

    // A map to store all fields to be loaded from JSON
    // (can be a list, vector or any other favourite container)
    std::map<std::string, GenericField*> m_fields;
};

At last but not at least, a field parser interface:

// An interface that is exposed to JsonSerializable that hides
// a type-specific serialization process.
class Field
{
public:

    // Contains just one method to set a field from a JSON value.
    virtual void set(const JsonValue& value) = 0;
};

// Generic type-specific implementation
template<typename TValue>
class GenericField : public Field
{
public:

    // Each field contains a pointer to a field, but here you can
    // also use pointer to a method or std::function to add setters.
    GenericField(TValue* value)
        : m_value(value)
    {

    }

    // And here is an actual serialization code, that extracts a
    // value from a JSON and writes to a pointed chunk of memory.
    virtual void set(const JsonValue& value)
    {
        *m_value = value.as<TValue>();
    }

private:

    TValue*         m_value;
};

So the basic idea here is to eliminate the code duplication by hiding actual serialization code behind a Field interface and localize string identifiers in a single place - inside a constructor of a serializable object.

Hope this helps.

1

I have a JSON parser which has this interface

int err = 0;
JSONParser jparser(json_as_stdstring);
x = jparser.getDouble("fielda, &err);
if(err)
   /* we have an error */

However err is sticky. So code can look like this

 int err = 0;
 JSONParser jparser(json_as_stdstring);
 Myclass myclass; // object to fill;
 myclass.x = jparser.getDouble("fielda", &err);
 myclass.name = jparser.getString("name", &err);
 myclass.id = jparser.getInteger("id" &err);
 if(err)
   /* we have an error */

It keeps the complexity out of the parsing, in the common situation that any error at all in the JSON invalidates the entire conversion. If you can tolerate bad or missing data, of course you handle it and reset err to 0.

0

First, we need ways to check the field's type and to fetch its value based on its C++ type.

template <typename T>
bool Is(const Field &field) { return false; }

template <> bool Is<bool>(const Field &field)   { return field.IsBool(); }
template <> bool Is<double>(const Field &field) { return field.IsDouble(); }
template <> bool Is<int>(const Field &field)    { return field.IsInt(); }

template <typename T>
T Get(const Field &field) { throw 0; }

template <> T Get<bool>(const Field &field)     { return field.GetBool(); }
template <> T Get<double>(const Field &field)   { return field.GetDouble(); }
template <> T Get<int>(const Field &field)      { return field.GetInt(); }

In the above, I'm assuming you have a limited number of types and specializing these function templates for each of them isn't a big deal. Note the Field is whatever type your JSON parser returns when you request a specific field.

Now we can build a generic extractor. I noticed your example also does the validation at this step, but I'm going to separate that out. Note the JSONThing is whatever the type of your JSON object is (the same as the type of item_[i] in the original post).

template <typename T>
T Extract(const JSONThing &json, const char * field_name) {
    if (!json.HasMember(field_name)) throw CustomException("missing field")
    const Field &field = json[field_name];
    if (!Is<T>(field)) throw CustomException("wrong type");
    return Get<T>(field);
}

For validation, you can use functions (or function templates) that return the input value if its valid. Admittedly, this is a little contrived, but it makes populating the objects quite straightforward.

template <typename T>
const T &Nonnegative(const T &value) {
  if (value < static_cast<T>(0)) throw CustomException("invalid value");
  return value;
}

Now you can populate your object like this:

const auto &json = item_[i];
obj.setField1(Nonnegative(Extract<double>(json, "Field1")));
obj.setField2(Extract<bool>(json, "Field2"));
obj.setField3(Nonnegative(Extract<int>(json, "Field3")));
// ...

I find this pretty readable, and it eliminates virtually all of the duplication, so there's little chance to make a mistake. You'd have to do a little more work if you want more detail in the custom exceptions.

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