3

Running the following code results in a crash. Why?

#include <boost/spirit/include/qi.hpp>
#include <boost/spirit/include/support_multi_pass.hpp>

using namespace boost::spirit;
typedef multi_pass<
            std::string::const_iterator,
            iterator_policies::default_policy<
                iterator_policies::first_owner,
                iterator_policies::no_check,
                iterator_policies::buffering_input_iterator,
                iterator_policies::split_std_deque>>
        string_mp_iterator;

int main() {
    std::string input = "234";
    string_mp_iterator input_begin(input.begin()),
            input_end((string_mp_iterator()));
    qi::rule<string_mp_iterator, boost::variant<int, double>()> r =
            &qi::lit('1') >> qi::int_ | qi::double_;
    qi::parse(input_begin, input_end, r);
    return 0;
}

To reproduce the crash I seem to need to have both a predicate and subsequent alternative, to be using a multi_pass iterator, and for the input to not satisfy the predicate.

I get the feeling that I'm somehow using multi_pass incorrectly here, but I don't see what the problem is exactly.

  • 2
    Are you trying to parse doubles vs. ints reliably? Search for stackoverflow.com/search?q=strict_real_policies – sehe Dec 31 '16 at 9:48
  • No, this is just an example where I'm trying to keep things a simple as possible. This will be nonetheless useful elsewhere. Thanks! – Jan Ladislav Dussek Jan 1 '17 at 2:37
  • That's the nature of Undefined Behaviour: you can't reason about it because the results are not defined – sehe Jan 1 '17 at 13:05
2

Simply fix the initializer for the end iterator.

string_mp_iterator input_end(input.end());

Since it's not an input iterator, you cannot use a default constructed iterator legally.

#include <boost/spirit/include/qi.hpp>
#include <boost/spirit/include/support_multi_pass.hpp>

using namespace boost::spirit;
typedef multi_pass<
    std::string::const_iterator,
    iterator_policies::default_policy<
        iterator_policies::first_owner, iterator_policies::no_check,
        iterator_policies::buffering_input_iterator,
        iterator_policies::split_std_deque>>
    string_mp_iterator;

int main() {
    std::string input = "234";
    string_mp_iterator input_begin(input.begin()),
                       input_end(input.end());
    qi::rule<string_mp_iterator, boost::variant<int, double>()> r = &qi::lit('1') >> qi::int_ | qi::double_;
    qi::parse(input_begin, input_end, r);
}
  • This clearly fixes the code, but it's still a mystery to me why the predicate and alternative combination is necessary to cause a crash. In my real use case I am not wrapping a string iterator into a multi_pass. This does nonetheless confirm my suspicion that my use of multi_pass is not correct. – Jan Ladislav Dussek Jan 1 '17 at 2:37
2

It seems you can not wrap std::string with a multi_pass iterator, at least, not with iterator_policies::buffering_input_iterator std::string has a pointer based end, not a null. That is why the iterator comes up incompatible. If you are going to just parse a std::string, use the iterators directly as they meet the requirement of multi_pass. If you plan on changing to a stream (code sorta from here):

typedef std::istreambuf_iterator<char> base_iterator_type;
typedef boost::spirit::multi_pass<base_iterator_type> forward_iterator_type;

main( )
{
    std::istringstream input( "234" );

    base_iterator_type in_begin(input);
    base_iterator_type in_end;
    forward_iterator_type fwd_begin = boost::spirit::make_default_multi_pass(in_begin);
    forward_iterator_type fwd_end   = boost::spirit::make_default_multi_pass(in_end);

    qi::rule<forward_iterator_type, boost::variant<int, double>()> r =
        &qi::lit('1') >> qi::int_ | qi::double_;
    qi::parse(fwd_begin, fwd_end, r);
    return 0;
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.