208

I wonder what's the correct way of converting (deserializing) a string to a Python's Enum class. Seems like getattr(YourEnumType, str) does the job, but I'm not sure if it's safe enough.

Just to be more specific, I would like to convert a 'debug'string to an Enum object like this:

class BuildType(Enum):
    debug = 200
    release = 400
0
339

This functionality is already built in to Enum [1]:

>>> from enum import Enum
>>> class Build(Enum):
...   debug = 200
...   build = 400
... 
>>> Build['debug']
<Build.debug: 200>

The member names are case sensitive, so if user-input is being converted you need to make sure case matches:

an_enum = input('Which type of build?')
build_type = Build[an_enum.lower()]

[1] Official docs: Enum programmatic access

8
  • 9
    What about a fallback value in case the input needs to be sanitised? Something in the sort of Build.get('illegal', Build.debug)?
    – Hetzroni
    Feb 5 '18 at 10:19
  • 1
    @Hetzroni: Enum does not come with a .get() method, but you can add one as needed, or just make a base Enum class and always inherit from that. Feb 5 '18 at 16:29
  • 1
    @Hetzroni: Per the "ask for forgiveness, not for permission" principle, you can always envelop the access in a try/except KeyError clause to return the default (and as Ethan mentioned, optionally wrap this up in your own function/method). Feb 9 '18 at 22:37
  • Worth noting here - if using this for serialization / deserialization, serialize the name property for this, so use Build.debug.name rather than str(Build.debug) for this sort of lookup to work (otherwise it tries to find Build.debug on the deserialization side which won't exist).
    – fquinner
    Oct 9 '19 at 11:22
  • 7
    @Dragonborn It wouldn't work to call Build('debug'). The class constructor must take the value, i.e. 200 or 400 in this example. To pass the name you must use square brackets, as the answer already says. Jan 20 '20 at 14:34
26

Another alternative (especially useful if your strings don't map 1-1 to your enum cases) is to add a staticmethod to your Enum, e.g.:

class QuestionType(enum.Enum):
    MULTI_SELECT = "multi"
    SINGLE_SELECT = "single"

    @staticmethod
    def from_str(label):
        if label in ('single', 'singleSelect'):
            return QuestionType.SINGLE_SELECT
        elif label in ('multi', 'multiSelect'):
            return QuestionType.MULTI_SELECT
        else:
            raise NotImplementedError

Then you can do question_type = QuestionType.from_str('singleSelect')

2
9
def custom_enum(typename, items_dict):
    class_definition = """
from enum import Enum

class {}(Enum):
    {}""".format(typename, '\n    '.join(['{} = {}'.format(k, v) for k, v in items_dict.items()]))

    namespace = dict(__name__='enum_%s' % typename)
    exec(class_definition, namespace)
    result = namespace[typename]
    result._source = class_definition
    return result

MyEnum = custom_enum('MyEnum', {'a': 123, 'b': 321})
print(MyEnum.a, MyEnum.b)

Or do you need to convert string to known Enum?

class MyEnum(Enum):
    a = 'aaa'
    b = 123

print(MyEnum('aaa'), MyEnum(123))

Or:

class BuildType(Enum):
    debug = 200
    release = 400

print(BuildType.__dict__['debug'])

print(eval('BuildType.debug'))
print(type(eval('BuildType.debug')))    
print(eval(BuildType.__name__ + '.debug'))  # for work with code refactoring
3
  • I mean I would like to convert a debug string to an enum of such: python class BuildType(Enum): debug = 200 release = 400
    – Vladius
    Dec 31 '16 at 11:29
  • Great tips! Is using __dict__ the same as getattr? I'm worrying about name collisions with internal Python attributes....
    – Vladius
    Dec 31 '16 at 12:38
  • Oh... yes it the same as getattr. I see no reason for name collisions. You just can't set keyword as field of class.
    – ADR
    Dec 31 '16 at 13:17
8

My Java-like solution to the problem. Hope it helps someone...

from enum import Enum, auto


class SignInMethod(Enum):
    EMAIL = auto(),
    GOOGLE = auto()

    @classmethod
    def value_of(cls, value):
        for k, v in cls.__members__.items():
            if k == value:
                return v
        else:
            raise ValueError(f"'{cls.__name__}' enum not found for '{value}'")


sim = SignInMethod.value_of('EMAIL')
assert sim == SignInMethod.EMAIL
assert sim.name == 'EMAIL'
assert isinstance(sim, SignInMethod)
# SignInMethod.value_of("invalid sign-in method")  # should raise `ValueError`
1
  • Today, do SignInMethod('EMAIL') had the same effect which that method Aug 20 at 18:19
2

An improvement to the answer of @rogueleaderr :

class QuestionType(enum.Enum):
    MULTI_SELECT = "multi"
    SINGLE_SELECT = "single"

    @classmethod
    def from_str(cls, label):
        if label in ('single', 'singleSelect'):
            return cls.SINGLE_SELECT
        elif label in ('multi', 'multiSelect'):
            return cls.MULTI_SELECT
        else:
            raise NotImplementedError
3
  • Is there any way to overwrite the __getitem__ or some other built-in method? Nov 4 '20 at 17:10
  • Improvement in which way?
    – Cleb
    Aug 22 at 20:38
  • if you use Class inside your function, you better use @ classmethod instead of @ staticmethod
    – Jackiexiao
    Sep 9 at 6:43
1

Since MyEnum['dontexist'] will result in error KeyError: 'dontexist', you might like to fail silently (eg. return None). In such case you can use the following static method:

class Statuses(enum.Enum):
    Unassigned = 1
    Assigned = 2

    @staticmethod
    def from_str(text):
        statuses = [status for status in dir(
            Statuses) if not status.startswith('_')]
        if text in statuses:
            return getattr(Statuses, text)
        return None


Statuses.from_str('Unassigned')
1

Change your class signature to this:

class BuildType(str, Enum):
1
  • 1
    Could you add more detail? How would one then use the class?
    – Cleb
    Aug 22 at 20:38
-1

I just want to notify this does not work in python 3.6

class MyEnum(Enum):
    a = 'aaa'
    b = 123

print(MyEnum('aaa'), MyEnum(123))

You will have to give the data as a tuple like this

MyEnum(('aaa',))

EDIT: This turns out to be false. Credits to a commenter for pointing out my mistake

2
  • Using Python 3.6.6, I could not reproduce this behaviour. I think you may have made a mistake while testing (I know I did the first time when checking this). If you accidentally put a , (comma) after each element (as if the elements were a list) then it treats each element as a tuple. (i.e. a = 'aaa', is actually the same as a = ('aaa',)) Oct 24 '18 at 4:06
  • You are right, It was different bug in my code. I Somehow thought you needed to put , behind every line while defining the enum which turned the values into tuples somehow
    – Sstuber
    Oct 24 '18 at 10:34

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