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I count 9 HTTP request methods (aka verbs):

GET
HEAD
POST
PUT
DELETE
CONNECT
OPTIONS
TRACE
PATCH

The above from: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/HTTP/Methods

Is that it? will this ever change?

2
  • Note: I know that formally these are "HTTP request methods" but I also see them referred to as "verbs", as the link above describes. Commented Jan 16, 2017 at 19:28
  • Technically, anything can happen. There seems to be some malware which apparently tries to transmit data via fabricated "verbs" - in one case, the verb looks like a very long (slightly obfuscated) base64 string. Now, such a thing is not HTTP as defined in any RFC. But it might pop up in your network traces.
    – Klaws
    Commented Jun 4, 2020 at 15:25

2 Answers 2

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+50

Registry

The HTTP 1.1 spec defines an Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) Method Registry. As of 2017-01, shows 39 entries:

  • ACL
  • BASELINE-CONTROL
  • BIND
  • CHECKIN
  • CHECKOUT
  • CONNECT
  • COPY
  • DELETE
  • GET
  • HEAD
  • LABEL
  • LINK
  • LOCK
  • MERGE
  • MKACTIVITY
  • MKCALENDAR
  • MKCOL
  • MKREDIRECTREF
  • MKWORKSPACE
  • MOVE
  • OPTIONS
  • ORDERPATCH
  • PATCH
  • POST
  • PRI
  • PROPFIND
  • PROPPATCH
  • PUT
  • REBIND
  • REPORT
  • SEARCH
  • TRACE
  • UNBIND
  • UNCHECKOUT
  • UNLINK
  • UNLOCK
  • UPDATE
  • UPDATEREDIRECTREF
  • VERSION-CONTROL

HTTP 1.0

HTTP 1.0 defined three methods (“verbs”):

  • GET
    … retrieve whatever information … is identified by the Request-URI…
  • POST
    … to request that the destination server accept the entity enclosed in the request as a new subordinate of the resource identified by the Request-URI in the Request-Line… Posting a message to a bulletin board, newsgroup, mailing list … Providing a block of data … Extending a database through an append operation …
  • HEAD
    … identical to GET except that the server MUST NOT return a message-body in the response … for obtaining metainformation about the entity implied by the request without transferring the entity-body itself…

HTTP 1.1

HTTP 1.1 is officially defined in RFC 2068. This spec added five more methods.

  • OPTIONS
    …a request for information about the communication options available on the request/response chain… determine the options and/or requirements associated with a resource, or the capabilities of a server, without implying a resource action or initiating a resource retrieval
  • PUT
    …requests that the enclosed entity be stored under the supplied Request-URI. If … already existing resource, the enclosed entity SHOULD be considered as a modified version of the one residing on the origin server…
  • DELETE
    …delete the resource identified by the Request-URI…
  • TRACE
    …loop- back of the request message…
  • CONNECT
    …for use with a proxy that can dynamically switch to being a tunnel (e.g. SSL tunneling…

HTTP Extensions

Other protocols extend HTTP to define additional methods/verbs.

  • PATCH
  • Applies partial modifications to a resource
  • Defined by RFC 5789
  • WebDAV specifies seven more methods:
    • PROPFIND
    • PROPPATCH
    • MKCOL
    • COPY
    • MOVE
    • LOCK
    • UNLOCK

HTTP/2

HTTP/2 is defined in RFC 7540. Section 3.5 defines a PRI method.

  • PRI
    In HTTP/2, each endpoint is required to send a connection preface as a final confirmation of the protocol in use and to establish the initial settings for the HTTP/2 connection. … the connection preface starts with the string "PRI * HTTP/2.0\r\n\r\nSM\r\n\r\n") …

Prognostication

will this ever change?

Not likely.

Given the wide use of Web RPC and SOAP, and now the rising popularity of RESTful services bringing new life to the existing basic verbs, there is little need to devise new verbs at the HTTP level. Where people need their own domain-specific meaningful verbs, they can embed within the message being delivered via HTTP.

I expect we’ll not see more HTTP methods become popular any time soon.

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  • 1
    Regarding HTTP/2: http2.github.io says "HTTP methods, status codes and semantics are the same", so it seems HTTP/2 doesn't introduce any new request methods ("verbs"), though in the spec I do see mention of a PRI method: "This method is never used by an actual client. This method will appear to be used when an HTTP/1.1 server or intermediary attempts to parse an HTTP/2 connection preface." Commented Jan 1, 2017 at 2:17
  • 1
    Is WebDAV actually a thing? I don't see it in practice. Admittedly my background is with webapps and REST APIs. Commented Jan 1, 2017 at 2:39
  • 1
    WebDAV is used quite a lot in content management, also (through CalDAV) in calendaring. Commented Jan 2, 2017 at 8:30
  • 2
    Thank you for link to registry. But HTTP 1.0/1.1 distribution is wrong. RFC 1945 declears: GET, HEAD, POST, PUT, DELETE, LINK and UNLINK are valid for http 1.0.
    – puchu
    Commented Dec 29, 2019 at 21:13
  • 1
    @puchu RFC 1945 (HTTP 1.0) declares only the first three: GET, HEAD, POST. The other four are mentioned only in an appendix. To quote: “ This appendix documents protocol elements used by some existing HTTP implementations, but not consistently and correctly across most HTTP/1.0 applications. Implementors should be aware of these features, but cannot rely upon their presence in, or interoperability” Commented Dec 29, 2019 at 21:59
3

See the spec:

"Additional methods, outside the scope of this specification, have been standardized for use in HTTP. All such methods ought to be registered within the "Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) Method Registry" maintained by IANA, as defined in Section 8.1." -- https://greenbytes.de/tech/webdav/rfc7231.html#rfc.section.4.1.p.7>

And the IANA registry contains many more.

1
  • 1
    I find the IANA registry at iana.org/assignments/http-methods/http-methods.xhtml -- this mentions 39 methods as of January 2017. Quite a few of these are from WebDAV or extensions to WebDAV. I do notice LINK and UNLINK which are related to HTTP 1.1, PRI related to HTTP/2. Commented Jan 1, 2017 at 22:30

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