3

I am trying to access application resources, (string resources to be specific) from a Singleton class. Being Singleton, this class cannot hold any reference to Context objects (to prevent memory leak). While I was looking for other implementations on the net, I came across this two implementation:

  1. Create a static context in Application class and use it across the app.
  2. Pass context as a parameter to the method that requires it.

I don't want to use the fist one as it also uses a static reference to Context object. I understand that it's ok to have it statically in the Application class of android, but still it looks like a hack.

The second implementation is useless since i don't have any instance of context which I can pass to the someOtherMethod of the singleton.

So I came up with following implementation where I make my Singleton abstract to override its context requiring methods (for ex. getString(int resId) in the code below) when I initialize the singleton instance.

I am curious to know if this can lead to any memory leaks now?

Where am I confused with this approach:

--> The reference to context in the Overridden getString is final. I am not sure if that can cause a memory leak or not.

    public abstract class SingletonClass{

    .
    .
    .

    private static SingletonClass sInstance;

    private SingletonClass(Context paramContext) {
        // constructor code
    }

    public static SingletonClass getInstance(final Context context) {
        if (sInstance == null) {
            sInstance = new SingletonClass(context){
                @Override
                public String getString(int resId) {
                    return context.getString(resId);
                }
            };
        }
        return sInstance;
    }

    public abstract String getString(int resId);

    .
    .
    .

    private void someOtherMethod(){
        //uses above getString()
    }

    }
  • Could you share how you are using these strings, and more specifically, why you won't have a Context when you are using them? In most cases, the Activity / Service / BroadcastReceiver / SQLiteOpenHelper / etc. would provide the context, making your singleton somewhat unnecessary. – chessdork Dec 31 '16 at 23:32
  • I am working on an android game and using Google Play Game Services in it. I thought of singleton as I need to keep a single GoogleApiClient across the app. – Ankit Mundada Dec 31 '16 at 23:54
0

Your approach does have a memory leak. The first context passed into getInstance will never be garbage collected, since your anonymous class holds a reference to it. (and there is a static reference to the anonymous class). e.g., if you call getInstance(Activity), that activity will remain in memory until the process is killed!

Fortunately there is a pretty easy fix to get rid of the memory leak. You can safely hold onto the application context (context.getApplicationContext), which is basically a singleton context for lifetime of the app.

public static SingletonClass getInstance(Context c) {
    if (sInstance == null) {
        sInstance = new SingletonClass(c.getApplicationContext());
    }
    return sInstance;
}
0

You can depend on activity lifecycle, and require activities to pass reference to your singleton object in onResume method, and clean it in onPause.

protected void onResume() {
  super.onResume();
  Singleton.getInstance().onResume(this);
}

protected void onPause() {
  super.onResume();
  Singleton.getInstance().onPause();
}

Also, you can refresh the instance of Context and hold it in WeakReference:

class Singleton {
  private WeakReference<Context> mContext;

  private boolean hasContext() {
    return mContext != null && mContext.get() != null;
  }

  public static Singleton getInstance(Context c) {
     //do your singleton lazy
     if (!sInstance.hasInstance()) {
       sInstance.mContext = new WeakReference<>(c);
     }
     return sInstance;
  }
}

Second case could hold a reference to finishing activity, so i don't suggest it.

  • What is the Singleton is doing something asynchronous. If the Context suddenly get null, it would throw an error, won't it? – Ankit Mundada Jan 1 '17 at 20:33
  • @AnkitMundada if your context gets null, than you have nothing to do with context anymore. You can just return null if context is null for resources. – Orest Savchak Jan 1 '17 at 20:36
  • I meant , in your first method, when i clean context in onResume() but if it is still used by an asychronous call of the Singleton, won't it throw an exception? Why do you say, 'you have nothing to do with context anymore' if its still being used by the asynch process? – Ankit Mundada Jan 1 '17 at 20:42
  • Use locking then, to avoid exceptions. It is your responsibility - handle asynchronous code, and it is not a common case. – Orest Savchak Jan 1 '17 at 20:48

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