2

I have two np.ndarray :

predictions = np.array([[0.2, 0.9], [0.01, 0.0], [0.3, 0.8], ...])
filenames = np.array(["file1", "file2", "file3", ...])

Each file in filenames correspond to each array in predictions:

file1==>[0.2, 0.9]

file2==>[0.01, 0.0]

file3==>[0.3,0.8] ...

I want to print out the values in these two arrays into an csv file, like below:

fileName        label1      label2
file1           0.2         0.9 
file2           0.1         0.0
file3           0.3         0.8

I hope use np.stack to merge these two np.array into one data structure, and then use np.savetext(path, array, ) to output to csv file.

But np.stack(array, axis=1) seems only accepts two arrays with same shape. Is there a way for stack to work for this case?

2

The solution using numpy.expand_dims and numpy.hstask routines:

import numpy as np
result = np.hstack((np.expand_dims(filenames, axis=1), predictions))

# saving to csv file using `np.savetxt`:
with open('./text_files/predictions.csv', 'wb') as fh:
    np.savetxt(fh, X= result, header='fileName\tlabel1\tlabel2', delimiter='\t', fmt='%-8s\t%-6s\t%-6s')

The predictions.csv(test file) contents:

# fileName  label1  label2
file1       0.2     0.9   
file2       0.01    0.0   
file3       0.3     0.8   
1

You can add another dimension to filenames and then use hstack() to stack it with predictions:

np.hstack([filenames[:, None], predictions])

#array([['file1', '0.2', '0.9'],
#       ['file2', '0.01', '0.0'],
#       ['file3', '0.3', '0.8']], 
#      dtype='|S32')
  • preds = np.hstack([filenames[:, None], predictions]) np.savetxt('my_submit.csv', preds, fmt='%d,%.5f, %.5f',header='image, ALB, BET', comments='') – user697911 Jan 2 '17 at 0:10
  • Why does the 'np.savetxt' generate this error: "TypeError: Mismatch between array dtype ('<U32') and format specifier ('%d,%.5f, %.5f') " – user697911 Jan 2 '17 at 0:11
  • 1
    The dtype when joining a string array to a numeric one is string. It can only be formatted with %s. not the numeric formatters. – hpaulj Jan 2 '17 at 0:48
1

Here's one way with zip:

>>> np.array(zip(filenames, *zip(*predictions)))
array([['file1', '0.2', '0.9'],
       ['file2', '0.01', '0.0'],
       ['file3', '0.3', '0.8']], 
      dtype='|S5')

And another with np.vstack:

>>> np.vstack((filenames, predictions.T)).T
array([['file1', '0.2', '0.9'],
       ['file2', '0.01', '0.0'],
       ['file3', '0.3', '0.8']], 
      dtype='|S5')
1

You have 2 arrays, one is 2d with numbers, the other 1d with strings

In [53]: predictions = np.array([[0.2, 0.9], [0.01, 0.0], [0.3, 0.8]])
    ...: filenames = np.array(["file1", "file2", "file3"])

In [54]: predictions
Out[54]: 
array([[ 0.2 ,  0.9 ],
       [ 0.01,  0.  ],
       [ 0.3 ,  0.8 ]])
In [55]: filenames
Out[55]: 
array(['file1', 'file2', 'file3'], 
      dtype='<U5')

If you add a dimension to filenames (so it becomes (3,1)), you can concatenate it with the other one - note the axis. I'm using Py3, so my default string type is unicode (U5).

In [56]: arr = np.concatenate((filenames[:,None], predictions),axis=1)
In [57]: arr
Out[57]: 
array([['file1', '0.2', '0.9'],
       ['file2', '0.01', '0.0'],
       ['file3', '0.3', '0.8']], 
      dtype='<U32')

Note that the result is of string type. Which is probably ok. column_stack and vstack can be used as well, but they end up adjusting dimensions, and using concatenate, just as I did.

np.stack joins arrays on a new dimension. I don't think you want a 3d array.

In [58]: np.savetxt('test', arr, fmt='%10s')
In [59]: cat test
     file1        0.2        0.9
     file2       0.01        0.0
     file3        0.3        0.8

You could adjust the fmt, though with strings you are stuck with some variation on %s. savetxt also allows a header and footer.

To have more control on the fmt, such as number of decimals etc, we'd have to construct a structured array, one that mixes a string field with 2 float fields. I can expand on that if needed.

Another option is to just zip the arrays and write lines. savetxt doesn't do anything magical when writing the text file.

In [65]: for f, n in zip(filenames, predictions):
    ...:     print('%s  %s'%(f, '%10.2f %10.2f'%tuple(n)))
    ...:     
file1        0.20       0.90
file2        0.01       0.00
file3        0.30       0.80

Given the complexity of creating a structured array from the 1 column string and 2 column float arrays, this last zip approach is probably the simplest.

structured array

In [114]: arr = np.zeros((3,),np.dtype('U10,f,f'))
In [115]: arr['f0']=filenames
In [116]: arr['f1']=predictions[:,0]
In [117]: arr['f2']=predictions[:,1]
In [118]: np.savetxt('test',arr, fmt='%10s %10.2f %10.1f')
In [119]: cat test
     file1       0.20        0.9
     file2       0.01        0.0
     file3       0.30        0.8

A simpler way of constructing this array is:

arr = np.rec.fromarrays((filenames, predictions[:,0], predictions[:,1]))

I'd prefer to make a structured array like this:

In [123]: dt=np.dtype([('files', 'U10'), ('pred', 'float64', (2,))])
In [124]: dt
Out[124]: dtype([('files', '<U10'), ('pred', '<f8', (2,))])
In [125]: arr = np.zeros((3,),dtype=dt)
In [126]: arr['files']=filenames
In [127]: arr['pred']=predictions
In [128]: arr
Out[128]: 
array([('file1', [0.2, 0.9]), ('file2', [0.01, 0.0]), ('file3', [0.3, 0.8])], 
      dtype=[('files', '<U10'), ('pred', '<f8', (2,))])

But np.savetxt can't handle that compound dtype. So I had to resort to putting the predictions in separate fields.

pandas does a better job of writing files with row labels.

  • np.savetxt('test', arr, fmt='%10s'): this put the probability into one column, I want 3 different columns. Why this doesn't work: "np.savetxt('test.csv', arr, fmt='%s,%.5f,%.5f', header='image, xx,yy')"? – user697911 Jan 2 '17 at 0:21
  • What is the shape of your arr? Mine is (3,3) (see Out[57]). – hpaulj Jan 2 '17 at 0:46
  • The problem of your solution, is it puts all the values into one column. I want each "0.2 0.9", for example, into two csv columns. – user697911 Jan 2 '17 at 3:13
  • I don't understand. My Out[59] shows 3 columns - the label and the 2 number columns. Except for the column header it is the same as the accepted answer. – hpaulj Jan 2 '17 at 3:33
  • 1
    Your line 59 actually is in one column, due to " fmt='%10s'", because you have only one format variable. I think it needs "%s, %s, %s". BTW, what's the '10' in "%10s"? – user697911 Jan 2 '17 at 3:59

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