18

I'm wondering what would be the best prectice regarding mainataining connections to the database in .Net application (ADO.NET but I guess the practice should be the same for any data layer). Should I create a database connection and propagate it throughout my application, or would it be better to just pass connection strings/factories and create a connection ad-hoc, when it is needed.

As I understand perfomance hit is not signifcant with pooling and it allows me to recover from broken connections quite easily (just a new connection will be created) but then again a connection object is a nice, relatively high-level abstraction and creating a new connection for every operation (not SQL command, but application operation) generates additional, duplicated code and feels like a waste of time/resources(?).

What do you think about these 2 cases, what are their cons/pros and which approach are you using in your real-life applications?

Thanks

14

I found myself needing to pass around a connection object so I could allow several business objects to save themselves to the database inside a single transaction.

If each business object had to create its own SQLConnection to the database, the transaction would escalate to a distributed transaction and I wanted to avoid that.

I did not like having to pass the SQLConnection object as a parameter to save an object, so I created a ConnectionManager that handles creating the SQLConnection object for me, tracking the use of the SQLConnection object, and disconnecting the SQLConnection object when not in use.

Here is some code as an example of the ConnectionManager:

public class ConnectionManager: IDisposable
{
    private ConnectionManager instance;

    [ThreadStatic]
    private static object lockObject; 
    private static Object LockObject
    {
        get
        {
            if (lockObject == null)
                lockObject = new object();
            return lockObject;
        }
    }

    [ThreadStatic]
    private static Dictionary<string, ConnectionManager> managers;
    private static Dictionary<string, ConnectionManager> Managers
    {
        get
        {
            if (managers == null)
                managers = new Dictionary<string, ConnectionManager>();
            return managers;
        }
    }

    private SqlConnection connection = null;
    private int referenceCount;
    private string name;


    public static ConnectionManager GetManager(string connectionName)
    {
        lock (LockObject)
        {
            ConnectionManager mgr;
            if (Managers.ContainsKey(connectionName))
            {
                mgr = Managers[connectionName];
            }
            else
            {
                mgr = new ConnectionManager(connectionName);
                Managers.Add(connectionName, mgr);
            }

            mgr.AddRef();
            return mgr;
        }
    }

    private ConnectionManager(string connectionName)
    {
        name = connectionName;
        connection = new SqlConnection(GetConnectionString(connectionName));
        connection.Open();
    }

    private string GetConnectionString(string connectionName)
    {
        string conString = Configuration.ConnectionString;
        return conString; 
    }

    public SqlConnection Connection
    {
        get { return connection; }
    }

    private void AddRef()
    {
        referenceCount += 1;
    }

    private void DeRef()
    {
        lock (LockObject)
        {
            referenceCount -= 1;
            if (referenceCount == 0)
            {
                connection.Dispose();
                Managers.Remove(name);
            }
        }
    }

#region IDisposable Members

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
    }

    protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (disposing)
        {
            DeRef();
        }
    }

    ~ConnectionManager()
    {
        Dispose(false);
    }

#endregion

}

Here is how I would use it from a business object:

public void Save()
{   
    using (ConnectionManager mrg = ConnectionManager.GetManager("SQLConnectionString")
    {
        using (SQLCommand cmd = new SQLCommand)
        {
            cmd.connection = mgr.Connection
            // More ADO Code Here
        }

        _childObject.Save(); //this child object follows the same pattern with a using ConnectionManager.
    }
}

I save a business object and all of its children are saved as well using the same connection object. When the scope falls away from original parent, the using statement closes the connection.

This is a pattern I learned from Rocky Lhotka in his CSLA framework.

Keith

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  • Thanks Keith. I really like your approach - ConnectionManager is a nice layer between connections and commands (you can even implement your own pooling if you really want to). I will have to read this chapter from CSLA. – Karol Kolenda Jan 5 '09 at 21:35
  • I'm confused as to why you want to have the managers member marked ThreadStatic. Each time the getter is accessed from a new thread, a new managers collection will be created for that thread right? – dnewcome Mar 26 '09 at 13:58
  • I see why you would want separate managers for each thread from a thread safety standpoint. You don't want the possibility of a SqlConnection being accessed by thread other than the one that created it. I don't think it would be illegal to do so, but you really open the door for unexpected things. – dnewcome Mar 26 '09 at 14:35
  • Is there any need to use a lock when the collection is ThreadStatic? – kristianp Jul 8 '14 at 6:02
2

You really shouldn't be handling this problem yourself, as there are countless tools out there that can do it for you.

If you really want to do it yourself, then look into the Unit of Work pattern where you can manage connection/transaction lifecycle. You certainly don't want to try to navigate the messy waters where there are connections being opened/closed in different places.

If you decide to let your components directly open db connections then it is likely that the connection lifecycle will be too fine-grained and result in many open/closed connections for a single user operation.

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  • just to add... some of the tools would include NHibernate, LINQ to SQL, SubSonic, and others... – Ben Scheirman Jan 5 '09 at 19:34
  • Thanks Ben You are absolutely right that in common scenarios the best option is to use some object persistence framework. Unfortunately my company product does not have many "fixed" objects but rather it allows users to create custom tables (like MS Access) - so I cannot really use OPF. – Karol Kolenda Jan 5 '09 at 21:27
1

ADO.NET SQL Server provider does the connection pooling itself. You can control the pool size by MinPoolSize and MaxPoolSize in the connection string.

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1

One thing to be wary of in your example is that ASP.NET apps should not use ThreadStatic storage, as a thread can be re-used, and if you do not clean up all your objects you end up with a connection hanging around.

In an ASP.NET app I'd use the HttpContext.Items collection instead. You are implementing IDisposable, but I've seen scenarios where devs forget to call Dispose or place the code in a using block.

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