1

I'm having an issue when running the code below. Every time I set the while loop to reach the .eof() it returns a std::bad_alloc

inFile.open(fileName, std::ios::in | std::ios::binary);

        if (inFile.is_open())
        {
            while (!inFile.eof())
            {
                read(inFile, readIn);
                vecMenu.push_back(readIn);
                menu.push_back(readIn);
                //count++;
            }

            std::cout << "File was loaded succesfully..." << std::endl;

            inFile.close();
        }

It runs fine if I set a predetermined number of iterations, but fails when I use the EOF funtion. Here's the code for the read function:

void read(std::fstream& file, std::string& str)
{
    if (file.is_open())
    {
        unsigned len;
        char *buf = nullptr;

        file.read(reinterpret_cast<char *>(&len), sizeof(unsigned));

        buf = new char[len + 1];

        file.read(buf, len);

        buf[len] = '\0';

        str = buf;

        std::cout << "Test: " << str << std::endl;

        delete[] buf;
    }
    else
    {
        std::cout << "File was not accessible" << std::endl;
    }
}

Any help you can provide is greatly appreciated. NOTE: I failed to mention that vecMenu is of type std::vector and menu is of type std::list

11
  • 3
    Please see this post: Why is iostream::eof inside a loop condition considered wrong?
    – Rakete1111
    Jan 2, 2017 at 2:55
  • 1
    Also, calling the allocator for every single line you read in is slowing down your program. Better to use a non-local std::vector and issue a resize() call than issuing new / delete calls each and every time. Jan 2, 2017 at 3:03
  • @RSahu Why? That's exactly the issue.
    – Baum mit Augen
    Jan 2, 2017 at 3:10
  • Add sanity check(s) to the value of len read from the file. Jan 2, 2017 at 3:10
  • @BaummitAugen, that's just of one of the problems in the OP's code.
    – R Sahu
    Jan 2, 2017 at 3:12

1 Answer 1

1

The main problems I see are:

  1. You are using while (!inFile.eof()) to end the loop. See Why is iostream::eof inside a loop condition considered wrong?.

  2. You are not checking whether calls to ifstream::read succeeded before using the variables that were read into.

I suggest:

  1. Changing your version of read to return a reference to ifstream. It should return the ifstream it takes as input. That makes it possible to use the call to read in the conditional of a loop.

  2. Checking whether calls to ifstream::read succeed before using them.

  3. Putting the call to read in the conditional of the while statement.

std::ifstream& read(std::fstream& file, std::string& str)
{
   if (file.is_open())
   {
      unsigned len;
      char *buf = nullptr;

      if !(file.read(reinterpret_cast<char *>(&len), sizeof(unsigned)))
      {
         return file;
      }

      buf = new char[len + 1];

      if ( !file.read(buf, len) )
      {
         delete [] buf;
         return file;
      }

      buf[len] = '\0';

      str = buf;

      std::cout << "Test: " << str << std::endl;

      delete[] buf;
   }
   else
   {
      std::cout << "File was not accessible" << std::endl;
   }

   return file;
}

and

inFile.open(fileName, std::ios::in | std::ios::binary);

if (inFile.is_open())
{
   std::cout << "File was loaded succesfully..." << std::endl;

   while (read(inFile, readIn))
   {
      vecMenu.push_back(readIn);
      menu.push_back(readIn);
      //count++;
   }

   inFile.close();
}
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