1

While trying to solve a LeetCode problem with Rust, I encountered a strange issue: it looks like I can't create a HashMap with primitive types:

use std::collections::HashMap;

fn two_sum(nums: &Vec<i32>, target: i32) -> (usize, usize) {
    let mut map = HashMap::new();
    for (i, x) in nums.iter().enumerate() {
        match map.get(target - x) {
            Some(k) => return (k, i),
            None => map.insert(x, i)
        };
    }
    return (0, 0);
}

fn main() {
    let ret = two_sum(&vec![1,2,3], 4);
    println!("{}, {}", ret.0, ret.1);
}

The compiler complains:

error[E0308]: mismatched types
 --> two_sum.rs:6:23
  |
6 |         match map.get(target - x) {
  |                       ^^^^^^^^^^ expected reference, found i32
  |
  = note: expected type `&_`
  = note:    found type `i32`

error[E0308]: mismatched types
 --> two_sum.rs:7:32
  |
7 |             Some(k) => return (k, i),
  |                                ^ expected usize, found reference
  |
  = note: expected type `usize`
  = note:    found type `&_`

Is it necessary to always use reference with HashMap in Rust?

EDIT:

Looks like it is necessary... The solution looks a bit ugly but works anyway.

use std::collections::HashMap;

fn two_sum(nums: &[i32], target: i32) -> (usize, usize) {
    let mut map = HashMap::new();
    for (i, x) in nums.iter().enumerate() {
        let df = target - x;
        if map.contains_key(&df) {
            return (*map.get(&df).unwrap(), i);
        }
        map.insert(x, i);
    }
    return (0, 0);
}

fn main() {
    let ret = two_sum(&vec![1,2,3], 4);
    println!("{}, {}", ret.0, ret.1);
}

I wonder if there is a better solution or some best practice to use HashMaps with primitive types?

2
  • The signature of std::collections::HashMap::get says yes, use a reference. – ljedrz Jan 2 '17 at 9:05
  • Note: it is more idiomatic for two_sum to take a &[i32] argument (as it is allows for a strict superset of possible arguments). – Matthieu M. Jan 2 '17 at 9:05
6

If you check the signature of the get method, you will realize that:

  • it accepts an argument &Q bounded by K: Borrow<Q>, Q: Hash + Eq
  • it returns Option<&V>

So, while the hash map itself will contain primitives, the interface of get requires a reference and returns a reference.

This means:

fn two_sum(nums: &Vec<i32>, target: i32) -> (usize, usize) {
    let mut map = HashMap::new();
    for (i, x) in nums.iter().enumerate() {
        match map.get(&(target - x)) {
            //        ^~~~~~~~~~~~~
            Some(k) => return (*k as usize, i),
            //                 ^~~~~~~~~~~
            None => map.insert(x, i)
        };
    }
    return (0, 0);
}

Where I (1) pass a reference to get and (2) dereference the result I get (and convert it from i32 to usize).

However, this does not yet work because map.get(&a) borrows the map for the duration of the map block, so you cannot also insert into it. This in turns is solved by moving the insertion after the match block:

fn two_sum(nums: &Vec<i32>, target: i32) -> (usize, usize) {
    let mut map = HashMap::new();
    for (i, x) in nums.iter().enumerate() {
            let a = target - x;
            match map.get(&a) {
                Some(k) => return (*k as usize, i),
                None => (),
            };
            map.insert(x, i);
    }
    return (0, 0);
}

That's it. Hashmap with primitives types.

Side note: unlike some other languages, primitive types are nigh indistinguishable from other types in Rust.

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