11

I have some class C with const and non-const getters for some generic type Node:

template <typename NodeType>
class CParent{};

class Node {};

class C : public CParent<Node> {
    Node&       getNode(Index i);
    const Node& getNode(Index i) const;
};

Now I want to create an alias function that call getNode for an object of class C:

template <class CType>
NodeType& AliasGetNode(CType* cobject);

But how do I deduce NodeType? i.e., if I call AliasGetNode<const C>(c) and AliasGetNode<C>(c), NodeTypeshould be respectively const Node&and Node&.

How can I do this?

I tried the result_of and decltype approaches but have not been successful.

2
  • I tried the result_of and decltype approaches but have not been successful. You should post what you tried, and what happened. Just making vague allusions to things and saying they didn't work is not useful. I mean, I'm guessing you just got 49 screenfuls of template errors, but it would be nice to be sure! Commented Jan 2, 2017 at 23:15
  • @underscore_d for sure. However in this case, since I expected the solution to be simple, I tried to avoid the 49 screenfuls of clutter. Plus, there are lots of specific questions on the result_of and decltype topic that do not address my problem specifically and I would get a wrong "duplicated" question flag
    – manatttta
    Commented Jan 3, 2017 at 8:19

5 Answers 5

21

Let the compiler deduce the return type (as of C++14):

template <class CType>
decltype(auto) AliasGetNode(CType& cobject)
{
    return cobject.getNode(0);
}
16
  • 4
    Nice! in c++11 you could also do auto AliasGetNode(CType& cobject) -> decltype(cobject.getNode(0))
    – W.F.
    Commented Jan 2, 2017 at 12:43
  • 1
    They both behave the same way. Both return a copy if decltype(auto) doesn't resolve to a reference type. Therefore auto & is more appropriate for the OP. Commented Jan 2, 2017 at 12:54
  • 2
    @StoryTeller That sounds like a bug stopped in its tracks before reaching the unit tests. Commented Jan 2, 2017 at 12:58
  • 4
    @Potatoswatter - And a hassle. decltype(auto) will deduce a reference type in the OP's case. And it will deduce Node correctly if the OP needs to return by value instead. It's not an abuse. The OP wants to return exactly the declared type of getNode(). decltype(auto) is the proper deduction. Commented Jan 2, 2017 at 13:01
  • 2
    @Potatoswatter - Do you have a reference for that proposal? Sounds like an interesting read. Commented Jan 2, 2017 at 13:10
12

I would recommend the:

template <class CType>
auto AliasGetNode(CType& cobject) -> decltype(cobject.getNode(0))
{
    return cobject.getNode(0);
}

This should fairly work since c++11

2
  • Selected this as answer for not using C++14, although it seems like a workaround
    – manatttta
    Commented Jan 3, 2017 at 8:17
  • 3
    Why does not using C++14 make this more correct? If anything, that makes it worse, and you did tag c++14 in your question. Commented Jan 3, 2017 at 11:15
6

Define a simple helper trait, which will add/remove const from a type based on whether another type is const:

template <class Src, class Dst>
using copy_const = typename std::conditional<
  std::is_const<Src>::value,
  const Dst,
  typename std::remove_const<Dst>::type
>::type;

And use it:

template <class CType>
copy_const<CType, NodeType>& AliasGetNode(CType* cobject);
5

Since C++14 the return type of a function may be deduced by the compiler:

template<typename CType>
decltype(auto) AliasGetNode(CType& cobject) {
    return cobject.getNode();
}

When you call AliasGetNode on the object of type Node, CType is deduced to Node. But if you call AliasGetNode on the object of type const Node, CType is deduced to const Node.

It is important to make return type of AliasGetNode as decltype(auto), otherwise you will miss a reference and constness for the returned type.

2
  • 2
    decltype(auto) does not guarantee a reference return type. auto & and auto const & do. Commented Jan 2, 2017 at 12:55
  • 1
    @Potatoswatter why not? Can you explain? Commented Jan 2, 2017 at 12:57
3

You should write two alias functions, one for non-const instance and the other for const instance:

template <class CType>
const NodeType& AliasGetNode(const CType* cobject) const;  // for const instance. 
// The function must be const since the only difference between return type will cause redefinition error.

template <class CType>
NodeType& AliasGetNode(CType* cobject);  // for non-const instance

The instances declared const will call the const functions if there are overload functions. Of course, non-const instances will call the non-const version of the overload function. For example:

class Aclass {
    public:
       string test() { return "calling non-const function"; }
       string test() const { return "calling const function"; }
};

int main() {
    Aclass a;
    const Aclass b;

    cout << a.test() << endl;
    cout << b.test() << endl;

    return 0;
}

The result will be:

calling non-const function
calling const function

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