12

In Cloudformation I have two stacks (one nested).

Nested stack "ec2-setup":

{
  "AWSTemplateFormatVersion" : "2010-09-09",

  "Parameters" : {
    // (...) some parameters here

    "userData" : {
      "Description" : "user data to be passed to instance",
      "Type" : "String",
      "Default": ""
    }

  },

  "Resources" : {

    "EC2Instance" : {
      "Type" : "AWS::EC2::Instance",
      "Properties" : {
        "UserData" : { "Ref" : "userData" },
        // (...) some other properties here
       }
    }

  },
  // (...)
}

Now in my main template I want to refer to nested template presented above and pass a bash script using the userData parameter. Additionally I do not want to inline the content of user data script because I want to reuse it for few ec2 instances (so I do not want to duplicate the script each time I declare ec2 instance in my main template).

I tried to achieve this by setting the content of the script as a default value of a parameter:

{
  "AWSTemplateFormatVersion": "2010-09-09",

  "Parameters" : {
    "myUserData": {
      "Type": "String",
      "Default" : { "Fn::Base64" : { "Fn::Join" : ["", [
        "#!/bin/bash \n",
        "yum update -y \n",

        "# Install the files and packages from the metadata\n",
        "echo 'tralala' > /tmp/hahaha"
      ]]}}
    }
  },
(...)

    "myEc2": {
      "Type": "AWS::CloudFormation::Stack",
      "Properties": {
        "TemplateURL": "s3://path/to/ec2-setup.json",
        "TimeoutInMinutes": "10",
        "Parameters": {
          // (...)
          "userData" : { "Ref" : "myUserData" }
        }

But I get following error while trying to launch stack:

"Template validation error: Template format error: Every Default member must be a string."

The error seems to be caused by the fact that the declaration { Fn::Base64 (...) } is an object - not a string (although it results in returning base64 encoded string).

All works ok, if I paste my script directly into to the parameters section (as inline script) when calling my nested template (instead of reffering to string set as parameter):

"myEc2": {
  "Type": "AWS::CloudFormation::Stack",
  "Properties": {
    "TemplateURL": "s3://path/to/ec2-setup.json",
    "TimeoutInMinutes": "10",
    "Parameters": {
      // (...)
      "userData" : { "Fn::Base64" : { "Fn::Join" : ["", [
        "#!/bin/bash \n",
        "yum update -y \n",

        "# Install the files and packages from the metadata\n",
        "echo 'tralala' > /tmp/hahaha"
        ]]}}
    }

but I want to keep the content of userData script in a parameter/variable to be able to reuse it.

Any chance to reuse such a bash script without a need to copy/paste it each time?

1
  • Unfortunately, intrinsic functions ( Fn::Base64, Fn::Join, and friends ) can't be used in the Parameters section. See docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSCloudFormation/latest/UserGuide/…. Besides, if you used the default in the Parameters section, it would still be duplicated in the 2 scripts.
    – erik258
    Commented Jan 2, 2017 at 21:14

3 Answers 3

18

Here are a few options on how to reuse a bash script in user-data for multiple EC2 instances defined through CloudFormation:

1. Set default parameter as string

Your original attempted solution should work, with a minor tweak: you must declare the default parameter as a string, as follows (using YAML instead of JSON makes it possible/easier to declare a multi-line string inline):

  AWSTemplateFormatVersion: "2010-09-09"
  Parameters:
    myUserData:
      Type: String
      Default: |
        #!/bin/bash
        yum update -y
        # Install the files and packages from the metadata
        echo 'tralala' > /tmp/hahaha
(...)
  Resources:
    myEc2:
      Type: AWS::CloudFormation::Stack
      Properties
        TemplateURL: "s3://path/to/ec2-setup.yml"
        TimeoutInMinutes: 10
        Parameters:
          # (...)
          userData: !Ref myUserData

Then, in your nested stack, apply any required intrinsic functions (Fn::Base64, as well as Fn::Sub which is quite helpful if you need to apply any Ref or Fn::GetAtt functions within your user-data script) within the EC2 instance's resource properties:

  AWSTemplateFormatVersion: "2010-09-09"
  Parameters:
    # (...) some parameters here
    userData:
      Description: user data to be passed to instance
      Type: String
      Default: ""    
  Resources:
    EC2Instance:
      Type: AWS::EC2::Instance
      Properties:
        UserData:
          "Fn::Base64":
            "Fn::Sub": !Ref userData
        # (...) some other properties here
  # (...)

2. Upload script to S3

You can upload your single Bash script to an S3 bucket, then invoke the script by adding a minimal user-data script in each EC2 instance in your template:

  AWSTemplateFormatVersion: "2010-09-09"
  Parameters:
    # (...) some parameters here
    ScriptBucket:
      Description: S3 bucket containing user-data script
      Type: String
    ScriptKey:
      Description: S3 object key containing user-data script
      Type: String
  Resources:
    EC2Instance:
      Type: AWS::EC2::Instance
      Properties:
        UserData:
          "Fn::Base64":
            "Fn::Sub": |
              #!/bin/bash
              aws s3 cp s3://${ScriptBucket}/${ScriptKey} - | bash -s
        # (...) some other properties here
  # (...)

3. Use preprocessor to inline script from single source

Finally, you can use a template-preprocessor tool like troposphere or your own to 'generate' verbose CloudFormation-executable templates from more compact/expressive source files. This approach will allow you to eliminate duplication in your source files - although the templates will contain 'duplicate' user-data scripts, this will only occur in the generated templates, so should not pose a problem.

8
  • Wonderfull answer! Solution 1 seems like exactly what I was looking for because this will allow me to keep the bash script in the same file as main template (which I would prefer at the moment). The others are also nice though. I'll test this approach today.
    – walkeros
    Commented Jan 3, 2017 at 8:43
  • Complementing the answer for solution 1. Putting script as default is possible in json, however all needs to be written in one line with "\n" char used as separator: "Default" : "#!/bin/bash \n yum update -y \n # Install the files and packages from the metadata\n echo 'tralala' > /tmp/hahaha" . However YAML multilne is still easier to read and maintain:)
    – walkeros
    Commented Jan 4, 2017 at 17:47
  • Approach (1) gives me Template error: One or more Fn::Sub intrinsic functions don't specify expected arguments. at validation time.
    – villasv
    Commented Jul 27, 2017 at 20:52
  • Apparently you can't use Ref as a first argument for Sub: stackoverflow.com/questions/44547004/…
    – villasv
    Commented Jul 27, 2017 at 20:58
  • I can't find a reference for what the logical "or" '|' does in this section: Default: | just before the bash script. What does that do?
    – Brad Ellis
    Commented Jul 24, 2018 at 17:23
1

You'll have to look outside the template to provide the same user data to multiple templates. A common approach here would be to abstract your template one step further, or "template the template". Use the same method to create both templates, and you'll keep them both DRY.

I'm a huge fan of cloudformation and use it to create most all my resources, especially for production-bound uses. But as powerful as it is, it isn't quite turn-key. In addition to creating the template, you'll also have to call the coudformation API to create the stack, and provide a stack name and parameters. Thus, automation around the use of cloudformation is a necessary part of a complete solution. This automation can be simplistic ( bash script, for example ) or sophisticated. I've taken to using ansible's cloudformation module to automate "around" the template, be it creating a template for the template with Jinja, or just providing different sets of parameters to the same reusable template, or doing discovery before the stack is created; whatever ancillary operations are necessary. Some folks really like troposphere for this purpose - if you're a pythonic thinker you might find it to be a good fit. Once you have automation of any kind handling the stack creation, you'll find it's easy to add steps to make the template itself more dynamic, or assemble multiple stacks from reusable components.

At work we use cloudformation quite a bit and are tending these days to prefer a compositional approach, where we define the shared components of the templates we use, and then compose the actual templates from components.

the other option would be to merge the two stacks, using conditionals to control the inclusion of the defined resources in any particular stack created from the template. This works OK in simple cases, but the combinatorial complexity of all those conditions tends to make this a difficult solution in the long run, unless the differences are really simple.

2
  • actually I was afraid that creating additional template level might be the only way in pure cloudformation. Thanks for your valuable input, though! You'r answer touches exactly the things I'm having a look at the moment - I already created "atomic" component templates (ec2 is just one of them, another is vpc,etc.) similar to the ones you described I think. Thanks for pointing the external tools I'll have a look at them. On the other hand I would love to just define the templates... than upload them to s3... than just call create stack (via webconsole or cli) and not use the extra tools
    – walkeros
    Commented Jan 2, 2017 at 22:43
  • 1
    You could also pass your bash script in with a parameter, already base64 encoded. But in that case, you won't be able to use any Ref pseudo parameters in the user data. That way you stay "pure cloudformation".
    – erik258
    Commented Jan 2, 2017 at 22:58
0

Actually I found one more solution than already mentioned. This solution on the one hand is a little "hackish", but on the other hand I found it to be really useful for "bash script" use case (and also for other parameters).

The idea is to create an extra stack - "parameters stack" - which will output the values. Since outputs of a stack are not limited to String (as it is for default values) we can define entire base64 encoded script as a single output from a stack.

The drawback is that every stack needs to define at least one resource, so our parameters stack also needs to define at least one resource. The solution for this issue is either to define the parameters in another template which already defines existing resource, or create a "fake resource" which will never be created becasue of a Condition which will never be satisified.

Here I present the solution with fake resource. First we create our new paramaters-stack.json as follows:

{
  "AWSTemplateFormatVersion": "2010-09-09",
  "Description": "Outputs/returns parameter values",


  "Conditions" : {
    "alwaysFalseCondition" : {"Fn::Equals" : ["aaaaaaaaaa", "bbbbbbbbbb"]}
  },

  "Resources": {
    "FakeResource" : {
      "Type" : "AWS::EC2::EIPAssociation",
      "Condition" : "alwaysFalseCondition",
      "Properties" : {
        "AllocationId" :  { "Ref": "AWS::NoValue" },
        "NetworkInterfaceId" : { "Ref": "AWS::NoValue" }
      }
    }
  },

  "Outputs": {
    "ec2InitScript": {
      "Value":
      { "Fn::Base64" : { "Fn::Join" : ["", [
        "#!/bin/bash \n",
        "yum update -y \n",

        "# Install the files and packages from the metadata\n",
        "echo 'tralala' > /tmp/hahaha"
      ]]}}

    }
  }
}

Now in the main template we first declare our paramters stack and later we refer to the output from that parameters stack:

{
  "AWSTemplateFormatVersion": "2010-09-09",

   "Resources": { 

    "myParameters": {
      "Type": "AWS::CloudFormation::Stack",
      "Properties": {
        "TemplateURL": "s3://path/to/paramaters-stack.json",
        "TimeoutInMinutes": "10"
      }
    },

    "myEc2": {
      "Type": "AWS::CloudFormation::Stack",
      "Properties": {
        "TemplateURL": "s3://path/to/ec2-setup.json",
        "TimeoutInMinutes": "10",
        "Parameters": {
          // (...)
          "userData" : {"Fn::GetAtt": [ "myParameters", "Outputs.ec2InitScript" ]}
        }
     }
  }
}

Please note that one can create up to 60 outputs in one stack file, so it is possible to define 60 variables/paramaters per single stack file using this technique.

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