67

Can this Python code be shortened and still be readable using itertools and sets?

result = {}
for widget_type, app in widgets:
    if widget_type not in result:
        result[widget_type] = []
    result[widget_type].append(app)

I can think of this only:

widget_types = zip(*widgets)[0]
dict([k, [v for w, v in widgets if w == k]) for k in set(widget_types)])
79

You can use a defaultdict(list).

from collections import defaultdict

result = defaultdict(list)
for widget_type, app in widgets:
    result[widget_type].append(app)
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1
115

An alternative to defaultdict is to use the setdefault method of standard dictionaries:

 result = {}
 for widget_type, app in widgets:
     result.setdefault(widget_type, []).append(app)

This relies on the fact that lists are mutable, so what is returned from setdefault is the same list as the one in the dictionary, therefore you can append to it.

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1
  • 4
    And that's my Python nugget to learn for the day. Thanks, Daniel. :) – Walter Nov 10 '10 at 12:39
6

may be a bit slow but works

result = {}
for widget_type, app in widgets:
    result[widget_type] = result.get(widget_type, []) + [app]
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2
  • why would this be slower than the other solutions? – David Schumann Jul 18 '17 at 14:35
  • 3
    It would be slower because the concat operator (+) creates a new list every time, while append() adds the element to the existing list. – Diego Aragão Sep 14 '18 at 17:45

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