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I'm developing a website with the microservice architecture, and each of the service owns a database. The database stores the data which the microservice needs.


Post, Video services need the user information, so both of the services subscribed to the NEW_USER_EVENT.

The NEW_USER_EVENT will be triggered when there's a new user registered.

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Once the services received the NEW_USER_EVENT, they put the incoming user information to each of their own database. So they can do things without asking the User service.

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So far so good. But here comes the question:

  • What if I'm going to create a new service? How do I get the registered user informations and put them in the new service?

Maybe I can get the informations from the existing services. But the events are pushed by the messaging queue (NSQ).

If I'm going to copy the data from one of the microservices, how do I make sure which service has the latest user informations? (Because some services haven't received the latest event)

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Read More:

The Hardest Part About Microservices: Your Data

Intro to Microservices, Part 4: Dependencies and Data Sharing

  • Why do "posts" and "videos" and other services need to know about user creation? If a request arrives related to a user who those services never heard of, they have no need to validate that the user exists... they can simply assume that the user must indeed exist, else they wouldn't have received a request related to the user. – Michael - sqlbot Jan 3 '17 at 23:41
  • @Michael The services received the username and they will convert it to the user_id without asking the User service for loose coupling. When the new user registered, the services will store the username-userId map in each of their database so they can convert it in their own service. – Yami Odymel Jan 4 '17 at 10:34
  • I know that this problem can be solved by using JWT, but I still have similar things not just about the user needs to be convert. – Yami Odymel Jan 4 '17 at 10:36
  • I don't think there's a need to have the user data in the new service - when you say there's a new piece of music (for instance), you'll post a "user ID_HERE created some music", and just store that ID. The service doesn't need to know anything other than the ID, does it? It could respond to a "User Disabled" event and archive them all potentially - though even that may not be required. Basically, am not sure why this service cares about usernames at all – Kieren Johnstone Jan 5 '17 at 7:55
  • Great diagrams by the way, what tool did you use Yami? – Kieren Johnstone Jan 5 '17 at 7:55
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What if I'm going to create a new service? How do I get the registered user informations and put them in the new service?

You have to replay all events to which this new service is subscribed from the beginning of time (you should have an "event store" that keeps all events already happened in your application). Also, you can put a bit smarter logic when replaying events by starting from the most recent ones and going back in time. In this way, you will be able to restore most valuable data first. Just be careful to handle interdependent events correctly.

Data source: The events are pushed by the messaging queue(NSQ), If I'm going to copy the data from one of the microservices, how do I make sure the copy source has the latest user informations?

You are not talking about doing backups, right?

Aside from backups, in the event-driven systems people usually don't copy the data in a classical way, row by row. Instead, they just replaying events from event store from the beginning of time and feeding those events to the event handlers for the new service (or new instance). As a result, new service eventually becomes consistent with the other parts of the system.

  • Just to be clear, you're talking about Event Sourcing I believe, which isn't necessarily tied to a microservices architecture? – Kieren Johnstone Jan 5 '17 at 7:57
  • You are correct, Yami pointed out that he is using NEW_USER_EVENT to synchronize data between services which implies usage of event sourcing techniques. – IlliakaillI Jan 5 '17 at 8:03
  • I might used the wrong way to described my last question, but your answer still helps me understand some extra things. I was talking about: Maybe I can get the registered user informations from the existing services, but since I'm using Messaging Queue to sync the user informations, I cannot make sure which service has the latest user informations (Because some services haven't received the NEW_USER_EVENT event yet). – Yami Odymel Jan 5 '17 at 8:05
  • If I'm going to create a event store, I still cannot make sure the event store has the latest events (If Event store = A microservice which subscribed to all the events). Or am I just overthinking about this, because Messaging Queue isn't that slow? – Yami Odymel Jan 5 '17 at 8:08
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    With Event Store it is guaranteed that it has the latest version. The reason is that all services should save events to event store directly and synchroniously. After that, some background worker may publish events to a bus if required. Some event stores have pub/sub built-in mechanisms already, so you don't even need a queue. This is actually a preferred way of doing ES. This one is pretty good: geteventstore.com – IlliakaillI Jan 5 '17 at 8:18

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