191

From the world of PHP I have decided to give C# a go. I've had a search but can't seem to find the answer of how to do the equivalent to this.

$object = new Object();

$vars = get_class_vars(get_class($object));

foreach($vars as $var)
{
    doSomething($object->$var);
}

I basically have a List of an object. The object could be one of three different types and will have a set of public properties. I want to be able to get a list of the properties for the object, loop over them and then write them out to a file. I'm thinking this has something to do with c# reflection but it's all new to me.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

1
  • 12
    As a side note: having objects of different types in a list (without a common base class or interface) is not a good programming style, at least not in c#. Nov 10, 2010 at 13:13

13 Answers 13

334

This should do it:

Type myType = myObject.GetType();
IList<PropertyInfo> props = new List<PropertyInfo>(myType.GetProperties());

foreach (PropertyInfo prop in props)
{
    object propValue = prop.GetValue(myObject, null);

    // Do something with propValue
}
7
  • 11
    @jonathan System.Reflection namespace
    – Cocowalla
    Jan 21, 2013 at 17:59
  • 31
    There is no really need to create a list from array, simply PropertyInfo[] props = input.GetType().GetProperties();
    – VladL
    Dec 17, 2014 at 10:11
  • 2
    Do you want to update for the 2017 answer using Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConvert?
    – user7739271
    Jul 21, 2017 at 17:56
  • 2
    @clone that's a completely different way of doing it. You should post an answer if you think it's a valid approach
    – Cocowalla
    Jul 22, 2017 at 7:31
  • 1
    @Jonesopolis how can you get properties from a dynamic without first casting it to an object and then doing the same as in my answer?
    – Cocowalla
    Dec 16, 2018 at 13:27
33
void Test(){
    var obj = new{a="aaa", b="bbb"};

    var val_a = obj.GetValObjDy("a"); //="aaa"
    var val_b = obj.GetValObjDy("b"); //="bbb"
}
//create in a static class
static public object GetValObjDy(this object obj, string propertyName)
{            
     return obj.GetType().GetProperty(propertyName).GetValue(obj, null);
}
20

Yes, Reflection would be the way to go. First, you would get the Type that represents the type (at runtime) of the instance in the list. You can do this by calling the GetType method on Object. Because it is on the Object class, it's callable by every object in .NET, as all types derive from Object (well, technically, not everything, but that's not important here).

Once you have the Type instance, you can call the GetProperties method to get the PropertyInfo instances which represent the run-time informationa about the properties on the Type.

Note, you can use the overloads of GetProperties to help classify which properties you retrieve.

From there, you would just write the information out to a file.

Your code above, translated, would be:

// The instance, it can be of any type.
object o = <some object>;

// Get the type.
Type type = o.GetType();

// Get all public instance properties.
// Use the override if you want to classify
// which properties to return.
foreach (PropertyInfo info in type.GetProperties())
{
    // Do something with the property info.
    DoSomething(info);
}

Note that if you want method information or field information, you would have to call the one of the overloads of the GetMethods or GetFields methods respectively.

Also note, it's one thing to list out the members to a file, but you shouldn't use this information to drive logic based on property sets.

Assuming you have control over the implementations of the types, you should derive from a common base class or implement a common interface and make the calls on those (you can use the as or is operator to help determine which base class/interface you are working with at runtime).

However, if you don't control these type definitions and have to drive logic based on pattern matching, then that's fine.

0
17

well, in C# it's similar. Here's one of the simplest examples (only for public properties):

var someObject = new { .../*properties*/... };
var propertyInfos = someObject.GetType().GetProperties();
foreach (PropertyInfo pInfo in propertyInfos)
{
    string propertyName = pInfo.Name; //gets the name of the property
    doSomething(pInfo.GetValue(someObject,null));
}
13

One line solution using Linq...

var obj = new {Property1 = 1, Property2 = 2};
var property1 = obj.GetType().GetProperties().First(o => o.Name == "Property1").GetValue(obj , null);
11

To get specific property value from property name

public class Bike{
public string Name {get;set;}
}

Bike b = new Bike {Name = "MyBike"};

to access property value of Name from string name of property

public object GetPropertyValue(string propertyName)
{
//returns value of property Name
return this.GetType().GetProperty(propertyName).GetValue(this, null);
} 
5

You can use GetType - GetProperties - Linq Foreach:

obj.GetType().GetProperties().ToList().ForEach(p =>{
                                                        //p is each PropertyInfo
                                                        DoSomething(p);
                                                    });
2

Here's something I use to transform an IEnumerable<T> into a DataTable that contains columns representing T's properties, with one row for each item in the IEnumerable:

public static DataTable ToDataTable<T>(IEnumerable<T> items)
{
    var table = CreateDataTableForPropertiesOfType<T>();
    PropertyInfo[] piT = typeof(T).GetProperties();
    foreach (var item in items)
    {
        var dr = table.NewRow();
        for (int property = 0; property < table.Columns.Count; property++)
        {
            if (piT[property].CanRead)
            {
                var value = piT[property].GetValue(item, null);
                if (piT[property].PropertyType.IsGenericType)
                {
                    if (value == null)
                    {
                        dr[property] = DBNull.Value;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        dr[property] = piT[property].GetValue(item, null);
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    dr[property] = piT[property].GetValue(item, null);
                }
            }
        }
        table.Rows.Add(dr);
    }
    return table;
}

public static DataTable CreateDataTableForPropertiesOfType<T>()
{
    DataTable dt = new DataTable();
    PropertyInfo[] piT = typeof(T).GetProperties();
    foreach (PropertyInfo pi in piT)
    {
        Type propertyType = null;
        if (pi.PropertyType.IsGenericType)
        {
            propertyType = pi.PropertyType.GetGenericArguments()[0];
        }
        else
        {
            propertyType = pi.PropertyType;
        }
        DataColumn dc = new DataColumn(pi.Name, propertyType);

        if (pi.CanRead)
        {
            dt.Columns.Add(dc);
        }
    }
    return dt;
}

This is "somewhat" overcomplicated, but it's actually quite good for seeing what the outcome is, as you can give it a List<T> of, for example:

public class Car
{
    string Make { get; set; }
    int YearOfManufacture {get; set; }
}

And you'll be returned a DataTable with the structure:

Make (string)
YearOfManufacture (int)

With one row per item in your List<Car>

1

This example trims all the string properties of an object.

public static void TrimModelProperties(Type type, object obj)
{
    var propertyInfoArray = type.GetProperties(
                                    BindingFlags.Public | 
                                    BindingFlags.Instance);
    foreach (var propertyInfo in propertyInfoArray)
    {
        var propValue = propertyInfo.GetValue(obj, null);
        if (propValue == null) 
            continue;
        if (propValue.GetType().Name == "String")
            propertyInfo.SetValue(
                             obj, 
                             ((string)propValue).Trim(), 
                             null);
    }
}
0

I haven't found this to work on, say Application objects. I have however had success with

var serializer = new System.Web.Script.Serialization.JavaScriptSerializer();

string rval = serializer.Serialize(myAppObj);
1
0

You can try this:

string[] arr = ((IEnumerable)obj).Cast<object>()
                                 .Select(x => x.ToString())
                                 .ToArray();

Once every array implements IEnumerable interface

0
public Dictionary<string, string> ToDictionary(object obj)
{
    Dictionary<string, string> dictionary = new Dictionary<string, string>();

    Type objectType = obj.GetType();
    IList<PropertyInfo> props = new List<PropertyInfo>(objectType.GetProperties());

    foreach (PropertyInfo prop in props)
    {
        object propValue = prop.GetValue(obj, null);
        dictionary.Add(prop.Name, propValue.ToString());
    }

    return dictionary;
}
0
    /// get set value field in object to object new (two object  field like ) 

    public static void SetValueObjectToObject (object sourceObj , object resultObj)
    {
        IList<PropertyInfo> props = new List<PropertyInfo>(sourceObj.GetType().GetProperties());
        foreach (PropertyInfo prop in props)
        {
            try
            {
                //get value in sourceObj
                object propValue = prop.GetValue(sourceObj, null);
                //set value in resultObj
                PropertyInfo propResult = resultObj.GetType().GetProperty(prop.Name, BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance);
                if (propResult != null && propResult.CanWrite)
                {
                    propResult.SetValue(resultObj, propValue, null);
                }
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {  
                // do something with Ex
            }
        }
    }

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.