121

I've got a parent component that goes to the server and fetches an object:

// parent component

@Component({
    selector : 'node-display',
    template : `
        <router-outlet [node]="node"></router-outlet>
    `
})

export class NodeDisplayComponent implements OnInit {

    node: Node;

    ngOnInit(): void {
        this.nodeService.getNode(path)
            .subscribe(
                node => {
                    this.node = node;
                },
                err => {
                    console.log(err);
                }
            );
    }

And in one of several childdren display:

export class ChildDisplay implements OnInit{

    @Input()
    node: Node;

    ngOnInit(): void {
        console.log(this.node);
    }

}

It doesn't seem I can just inject data into the router-outlet. It looks like I get the error in the web console:

Can't bind to 'node' since it isn't a known property of 'router-outlet'.

This somewhat makes sense, but how would I do the following:

  1. Grab the "node" data from the server, from within the parent component?
  2. Pass the data I have retrieved from the server into the child router-outlet?

It doesn't seem like router-outlets work the same way.

89
<router-outlet [node]="..."></router-outlet> 

is just invalid. The component added by the router is added as sibling to <router-outlet> and does not replace it.

See also https://angular.io/guide/component-interaction#parent-and-children-communicate-via-a-service

@Injectable() 
export class NodeService {
  private node:Subject<Node> = new BehaviorSubject<Node>([]);

  get node$(){
    return this.node.asObservable().filter(node => !!node);
  }

  addNode(data:Node) {
    this.node.next(data);
  }
}
@Component({
    selector : 'node-display',
    providers: [NodeService],
    template : `
        <router-outlet></router-outlet>
    `
})
export class NodeDisplayComponent implements OnInit {
    constructor(private nodeService:NodeService) {}
    node: Node;
    ngOnInit(): void {
        this.nodeService.getNode(path)
            .subscribe(
                node => {
                    this.nodeService.addNode(node);
                },
                err => {
                    console.log(err);
                }
            );
    }
}
export class ChildDisplay implements OnInit{
    constructor(nodeService:NodeService) {
      nodeService.node$.subscribe(n => this.node = n);
    }
}
3
  • Can this be used to give an ID to the child? I've tried changed all the node where it's as a type to string and it doesn't seem to work or I'm doing something wrong – Wanjia Jan 24 '18 at 9:13
  • You can pass any data to the child component but the child component needs to set the id itself. You can try to get an ElementRef from an event from the router outlet to use it to set the id but I don't know by heart if or how to do that (only on my phone) – Günter Zöchbauer Jan 24 '18 at 10:06
  • It is possible to transfer data through router-outlet directive. We can use "activate" event for this. For more details read my article See also angular.io/guide/… See also linkedin.com/pulse/… – Günter Zöchbauer Jan 10 at 15:29
47

Günters answer is great, I just want to point out another way without using Observables.

Here we though have to remember that these objects are passed by reference, so if you want to do some work on the object in the child and not affect the parent object, I would suggest using Günther's solution. But if it doesn't matter, or actually is desired behavior, I would suggest the following.

@Injectable()
export class SharedService {

    sharedNode = {
      // properties
    };
}

In your parent you can assign the value:

this.sharedService.sharedNode = this.node;

And in your children (AND parent), inject the shared Service in your constructor. Remember to provide the service at module level providers array if you want a singleton service all over the components in that module. Alternatively, just add the service in the providers array in the parent only, then the parent and child will share the same instance of service.

node: Node;

ngOnInit() {
    this.node = this.sharedService.sharedNode;    
}

And as newman kindly pointed, you can also have this.sharedService.sharedNode in the html template or a getter:

get sharedNode(){
  return this.sharedService.sharedNode;
}
1
  • 5
    you can/should bind to sharedService.sharedNode in html directly. This way, updates in sharedNode will be kept in sync. – newman Apr 6 '17 at 4:09
20

Yes, you can set inputs of components displayed via router outlets. Sadly, you have to do it programmatically, as mentioned in other answers. There's a big caveat to that when observables are involved (described below).

Here's how:

(1) Hook up to the router-outlet's activate event in the parent template:

<router-outlet (activate)="onOutletLoaded($event)"></router-outlet>

(2) Switch to the parent's typescript file and set the child component's inputs programmatically each time they are activated:

onOutletLoaded(component) {
    component.node = 'someValue';
} 

Done.

However, the above version of onOutletLoaded is simplified for clarity. It only works if you can guarantee all child components have the exact same inputs you are assigning. If you have components with different inputs, use type guards:

onChildLoaded(component: MyComponent1 | MyComponent2) {
  if (component instanceof MyComponent1) {
    component.someInput = 123;
  } else if (component instanceof MyComponent2) {
    component.anotherInput = 456;
  }
}

Why may this method be preferred over the service method?

Neither this method nor the service method are "the right way" to communicate with child components (both methods step away from pure template binding), so you just have to decide which way feels more appropriate for the project.

This method, however, avoids the tight coupling associated with the "create a service for communication" approach (i.e., the parent needs the service, and the children all need the service, making the children unusable elsewhere). Decoupling is usually preferred.

In many cases this method also feels closer to the "angular way" because you can continue passing data to your child components through @Inputs (thats the decoupling part - this enables re-use elsewhere). It's also a good fit for already existing or third-party components that you don't want to or can't tightly couple with your service.

On the other hand, it may feel less like the angular way when...

Caveat

The caveat with this method is that since you are passing data in the typescript file, you no longer have the option of using the pipe-async pattern used in templates (e.g. {{ myObservable$ | async }}) to automagically use and pass on your observable data to child components.

Instead, you'll need to set up something to get the current observable values whenever the onChildLoaded function is called. This will likely also require some teardown in the parent component's onDestroy function. This is nothing too unusual, there are often cases where this needs to be done, such as when using an observable that doesn't even get to the template.

4
  • 1
    Thanks! this is a great answer 👍 – Elad Dec 10 '20 at 17:36
  • and what if the child component gets activated before the parent component finish an http request? – Kardon63 Jan 11 at 20:17
  • @Kardon63, I don't think that's relevant to this question. What you are describing can happen in many different situations. You should open another question and clarify your specific situation. – uɥƃnɐʌuop Jan 12 at 22:50
  • @uɥƃnɐʌuop okk thanks for the clarification – Kardon63 Jan 13 at 7:47
10

Service:

import {Injectable, EventEmitter} from "@angular/core";    

@Injectable()
export class DataService {
onGetData: EventEmitter = new EventEmitter();

getData() {
  this.http.post(...params).map(res => {
    this.onGetData.emit(res.json());
  })
}

Component:

import {Component} from '@angular/core';    
import {DataService} from "../services/data.service";       
    
@Component()
export class MyComponent {
  constructor(private DataService:DataService) {
    this.DataService.onGetData.subscribe(res => {
      (from service on .emit() )
    })
  }

  //To send data to all subscribers from current component
  sendData() {
    this.DataService.onGetData.emit(--NEW DATA--);
  }
}
0
9

There are 3 ways to pass data from Parent to Children

  1. Through shareable service : you should store into a service the data you would like to share with the children
  2. Through Children Router Resolver if you have to receive different data

    this.data = this.route.snaphsot.data['dataFromResolver'];
    
  3. Through Parent Router Resolver if your have to receive the same data from parent

    this.data = this.route.parent.snaphsot.data['dataFromResolver'];
    

Note1: You can read about resolver here. There is also an example of resolver and how to register the resolver into the module and then retrieve data from resolver into the component. The resolver registration is the same on the parent and child.

Note2: You can read about ActivatedRoute here to be able to get data from router

1

Following this question, in Angular 7.2 you can pass data from parent to child using the history state. So you can do something like

Send:

this.router.navigate(['action-selection'], { state: { example: 'bar' } });

Retrieve:

constructor(private router: Router) {
  console.log(this.router.getCurrentNavigation().extras.state.example);
}

But be careful to be consistent. For example, suppose you want to display a list on a left side bar and the details of the selected item on the right by using a router-outlet. Something like:


Item 1 (x) | ..............................................

Item 2 (x) | ......Selected Item Details.......

Item 3 (x) | ..............................................

Item 4 (x) | ..............................................


Now, suppose you have already clicked some items. Clicking the browsers back buttons will show the details from the previous item. But what if, meanwhile, you have clicked the (x) and delete from your list that item? Then performing the back click, will show you the details of a deleted item.

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