0

In Javascript I can do this:

myVar = 1
obj = { myVar }
obj.myVar == 1 // true

In Ruby it's only possible to do something similar to this in methods, with keyword arguments:

def foo(a:, b:)
  [a,b]
end
foo(a: 1, b: 2) # [1,2]

In practice I find this makes the code more verbose. Rather than naming a variable once, as I'd do with sequential arguments, I have to name it twice in order to send it as an argument:

def method_1(a:, b:)
  method_2(a: a, b: b) # repetition is here
end

I'm aware of the ** operator which serves as a splat for keyword arguments. But I'd rather not put splats in my method definitions, because it makes code less comprehensible.

I'm not saying keyword arguments are useless (it's clearer than parsing an options hash) but they would be more useful if they supported regular hash construction, like in Javascript.

Anyway, I'm wondering if there is any way to do this in Ruby itself, or if I should look to another language.

1
  • 2
    You're really going to abandon the language because you have to type a: a?
    – user229044
    Jan 4, 2017 at 4:08

2 Answers 2

2

Anyway, I'm wondering if there is any way to do this in Ruby itself,

No, there isn't.

7
  • There are actually ways to do this.
    – akuhn
    Jan 4, 2017 at 4:16
  • @akuhn No, there aren't. Your way isn't even close, and it relies on MRI-specific functionality to achieve the limited success that it does, resulting in a syntax that technically allows you to avoid repeating the variable names, but requires you to wrap them instead in a binding.fun %w{...} which is hardly an improvement. That kind of pseudo-syntax-extension is to be avoided, inventing your own Ruby locale is not desirable.
    – user229044
    Jan 4, 2017 at 4:50
  • You can choose a shorter syntax, like redefining `Kernel#``
    – akuhn
    Jan 4, 2017 at 4:55
  • @akuhn That's an even worse idea. Again, Ruby doesn't support this, and inventing your own "close enough" syntaxes by patching core classes is not desirable. You are effectively making a sub-language of Ruby that only you understand.
    – user229044
    Jan 4, 2017 at 4:56
  • That is called a DSL, aka domain specific language, and is a perfectly perfect application of Ruby. I wouldn't know another language that is so strong at creating "sublanguages" other than lisp.
    – akuhn
    Jan 4, 2017 at 5:02
0

Try this

class Binding
  def fun(names)
    names.zip(names.map(&method(:eval))).to_h
  end
end

a = 1
b = 2
h = binding.fun %w{a b}
p h
# => {"a"=>1, "b"=>2}

Or,

if you don't want to have to define a function on Binding class

require 'debug_inspector'

def fun(names)
  RubyVM::DebugInspector.open do |inspector|
    names.zip(names.map { |name| eval(name, inspector.frame_binding(2)) }).to_h
  end
end

a = 1
b = 2
h = fun %w{a b}
p h
# => {"a"=>1, "b"=>2}

Or,

if you want really concise syntax and don't plan on using the builtin backtick function.

require 'debug_inspector'

def `(str) 
  # overrides builtin ` function, use with caution!
  RubyVM::DebugInspector.open do |inspector|
    str.split(?,).zip(eval("[#{str}]", inspector.frame_binding(2))).to_h
  end
end

a = 1
b = 2
h = `a, b`
p h
# => {"a"=>1, "b"=>2}
5
  • 1
    That is totally different syntax than the OP is referring to. Also, your code isn't complete. You never initialize binding. Clearly, you're not making your code any more concise with this method as the OP is going for. Jan 4, 2017 at 4:22
  • 2
    binding does not have to be initialized
    – akuhn
    Jan 4, 2017 at 4:23
  • I'll admit to that being a mistake on my part. But even so, are you really arguing that your code is really very similar to a javascript concept like the OP requests? Jan 4, 2017 at 4:25
  • 2
    As far as I understand they don't want to have to repeat key and value. Personally I tend to agree with meagar's comment, but that is not up to me to judge. I just show how close Ruby can get to Javascript's syntax.
    – akuhn
    Jan 4, 2017 at 4:31
  • I gemified that backtick patch (gave you credit of course) - keyword_hash_builder. With refinements I don't think it's that bad. Jan 4, 2017 at 7:20

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