1

Im trying to get my head around some aspects of Unit testing, so I've created a simple solution with the following architecture:

enter image description here

In the Business layer I've created a FizzBuzz class (FizzBuzzService) that implements an IFizzBuzz interface.

namespace SampleApp2017.Business
{
public class FizzBuzzService : IFizzBuzz
{
    public bool IsFizzBuzz(int num)
    {
        if (num % 3 == 0 || num % 6 == 0)
        {
            return true;
        }
        else
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

    public bool IsFizz(int num)
    {
       return (num % 3 == 0 ? true : false);
    }

    public bool IsBuzz(int num)
    {
        if (num % 6 == 0)
        {
            return true;
        }
        else
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
}
}

(and heres the Interface details for reference)

namespace SampleApp2017.Business
{
public interface IFizzBuzz
{

    bool IsFizzBuzz(int num);

    bool IsFizz(int num);

    bool IsBuzz(int num);
}
}

In this sample solution, the FizzBuzz service is consumed by both the WebUI and the ConsoleApp using Dependancy Injection, I understand why this is necessary however when it comes to Unit Testing the service i'm getting confused.

Below is a test I have set up for the FizzBuzz method:

  [TestMethod]
    public void fizzbuzz_should_return_true()
    {
        //Arrange
        //Bring in the business rules
        IFizzBuzz _fbservice = new FizzBuzzService();

        //Act
        /// Send 12 to service, should return true
        bool resultof12 = _fbservice.IsFizzBuzz(12);

        //Assert
        Assert.AreEqual(resultof12, true);
    }

I'm now looking for some guidance on the 'best practice' for running unit tests.

  1. Does the above test look OK? (it runs fine)
  2. Is is common to use DI with Unit Testing? Surely I am testing the concrete implentation of a class?
  3. In unit testing do I need to programme to an interface? What would be the problem with:

    FizzBuzzService _fbservice = new FizzBuzzService();

  4. And finally, if I wanted to Mock in this example, where does it come in and what are the advantages?

  • @Nkosi updated as per your suggestion – Dez79 Jan 4 '17 at 12:15
1
  1. It is ok, but suggest to add more testing values for parameter.
    Choose more descriptive method name, based on the current name I can think your method returns always true.
  2. In your case you don't need DI, because you implementation don't have other dependencies.
    If you talking about DI containers in unit tests then I prefer not using them and pass dependencies manually in tests.
  3. I think it is better to test actual implementation of this class. It give clear message about your tests to other readers/developers

    FizzBuzzService _fbservice = new FizzBuzzService(); //  better then IBuzzService
    
  4. In current example you don't need Mock at all. Because your class don't have other dependencies.
    Use Mocks when you need provide results of some dependencies which logic not part of current tests.
    Mocks can be passed as constructor parameter, or as method parameter or to be a Property of current class.

Reply on comment about mocking:
You need Mock for the reason not to interact with database. Unit tests must be fast, if they not fast developers will not run them. So you don't want that your unit test talking to database or other IO devices.
You not event need mocking frameworks - you can create own mock by implementing interfaces with logic for testing

public interface IUserDataService
{
    User GetById(int id);
}

public class BonusCalculator
{
    private readonly IUserdataService _dataService;
    public BonusCalculator(IUserDataService dataService)
    {
        _dataService = dataService;
    }

    public int CalculateBonusForUser(int userId)
    {
        const int BONUS = 100;
        var deservedBonus = 0;
        var user = _dataService.GetById(userId);

        if (user.IsDeservedBonus)
        {
            deservedBonus += BONUS;
        }

        return deservedBonus;
    }
}

Now you want to test that if user returned by UserDataService deserved bonus returned value will be equal to 100.

So you can create own "testing" implementation of GetById

public class FakeUserDataService : IUserDataService
{
    public User DummyUser { get; set; }
    public User GetById(int id) => DummyUser;
}

Then you can test logic of CalculateBonusForUser without concerns how user returned, because this not concerns of this class

public void CalculateBonusForUser_ShouldReturn100_WhenUserIsDeservedEqualsTrue()
{
    var user = new User { IsDeserved = true };
    var fakeDataService = new FakeUserDataService { DummyUser = user };
    var calculator = new BonusCalculator(fakeDataService);

    var actualBonus = calculator.CalculateBonusForUser(1);

    Assert(actualBonus, 100);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks @Fabio, this is starting to make more sense now, in regards to 4 above, in my other solutions I am using the repository pattern with a UOW to interact with the datasource. Would I be correct in saying I would need to Mock the UOW interface that interacts with my database in order to test a service such as _userService.GetUser(45) ? – Dez79 Jan 4 '17 at 12:10
  • 1
    Check updated answer... – Fabio Jan 4 '17 at 12:35

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