14

Is it possible to convert a string to ordinal upper or lower case. Similar like invariant.

string upperInvariant = "ß".ToUpperInvariant();
string lowerInvariant = "ß".ToLowerInvariant();
bool invariant = upperInvariant == lowerInvariant; // true

string upperOrdinal = "ß".ToUpperOrdinal(); // SS
string lowerOrdinal = "ß".ToLowerOrdinal(); // ss
bool ordinal = upperOrdinal == lowerOrdinal; // false

How to implement ToUpperOrdinal and ToLowerOrdinal?

Edit: How to to get the ordinal string representation? Likewise, how to get the invariant string representation? Maybe that's not possible as in the above case it might be ambiguous, at least for the ordinal representation.

Edit2:

string.Equals("ß", "ss", StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase); // true

but

"ß".ToLowerInvariant() == "ss"; // false
10
  • 2
    @diiN__________ I don't think the idea of extension methods are what OP needs help with. They just don't know what the code for such a method should be. Jan 4 '17 at 14:42
  • I'm not asking about extension methods or stringcomparison. Only how to get the ordinal string representation.
    – Wouter
    Jan 4 '17 at 14:44
  • 9
    There is no ordinal string respresentation because ordinal comparison means "compare each byte". Jan 4 '17 at 14:46
  • 1
    @TimSchmelter so why StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase exists, which bytes are case senstive?
    – Wouter
    Jan 4 '17 at 14:53
  • 3
    @Wouter because it converts them to uppercase first. From the docs TheStringComparer returned by the OrdinalIgnoreCase property treats the characters in the strings to compare as if they were converted to uppercase using the conventions of the invariant culture Jan 4 '17 at 14:57
2

I don't believe this functionality exists in the .NET Framework or .NET Core. The closest thing is string.Normalize(), but it is missing the case fold option that you need to successfully pull this off.

This functionality exists in the ICU project (which is available in C/Java). The functionality you are after is the unorm2.h file in C or the Normalizer2 class in Java. Example usage in Java and related test.

There are 2 implementations of Normalizer2 that I am aware of that have been ported to C#:

  • icu-dotnet (a C# wrapper library for ICU4C)
  • ICU4N (a fully managed port of ICU4J)

Full Disclosure: I am a maintainer of ICU4N.

2
  • Thanx, for this addition, from what i red on msdn Normalize doesn't change upper and lowercase only normalizes the many equivalent binary representations. I also found that unicode 00df and 1e9e are related. But somehow 1e9e is not the uppercase of 00df. See: fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/00df/index.htm and fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/1e9e/index.htm.
    – Wouter
    Oct 5 '17 at 15:02
  • Yes, that is why I mentioned it isn't quite up to par in my answer. To make it work like this, a call to the ICU unorm2.h is needed. It would be best to model the API after the Java Normalizer2 class and drop it into the icu.net project so it is available to everyone. Oct 5 '17 at 15:27
1

From msdn:

TheStringComparer returned by the OrdinalIgnoreCase property treats the characters in the strings to compare as if they were converted to uppercase using the conventions of the invariant culture, and then performs a simple byte comparison that is independent of language.

But I'm guessing doing that won't achieve what you want, since simply doing "ß".ToUpperInvariant() won't give you a string that is ordinally equivallent to "ss". There must be some magic in the String.Equals method that handles the speciall case of Why “ss” equals 'ß'.

If you're only worried about German text then this answer might help.

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.