4

Can't understand what I am doing wrong, the result set is empty.
My code:

class Class1
    {

        public static object DeSerialize()
        {
            object resultObject;

            XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(PointsContainer));
           using (TextReader textReader = new StreamReader(@"d:\point.xml"))
            {
                resultObject = serializer.Deserialize(textReader);
            }

            return resultObject;


        }
    }

    [Serializable]
    [XmlRoot("Points")]
    public class PointsContainer
    {
        [XmlElement("Point")]       
        private List<Point> items = new List<Point>();

        public List<Point> Items
        {
            get { return items; }
            set { items = value; }
        }


    }


    [Serializable]   
    public class Point
    {      
        [XmlAttribute]
        public bool x { get; set; }

        [XmlAttribute]
        public bool y { get; set; }
    }

Xml:

<Points>  
   <Point x="1" y="5"/>
   <Point x="21" y="3"/>
   <Point x="3" y="7"/>
</Points>
8

Move the [XmlElement] attribute to the property.
XmlSerializer ignores private members.

1

as SLaks says

also your Point object shows both fields as bools yet the values in the xml file are ints at least (21, 3,5,7 etc)

1

bool variables can either be true or false which have an integer value of 1 and 0. So your XML has invalid data and/or your class properties are of the wrong type.

1
[XmlElement("Point")]
public List<Point> Items
{
  get { return items; }
  set { items = value; }
}

And in your point class both x and y should not be bools.

1

Solution:

namespace XmlStackProblem
{
    class Class1
    {

        public static void Main()
        {
            Points resultObject;

            XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(Points));
            using (TextReader textReader = new StreamReader(@"d:\points.xml"))
            {
                resultObject = serializer.Deserialize(textReader) as Points;
            }
        }
    }

    [Serializable]
    [XmlRoot(IsNullable = false)]
    public class Points
    {
        [XmlElementAttribute("Point")]
        public List<Point> Point
        {
            get; set;
        }
    }

    [Serializable]
    [XmlType(AnonymousType = true)]
    public class Point
    {
        [XmlAttribute]
        public int x
        {
            get;
            set;
        }

        [XmlAttribute]
        public int y { get; set; }
    }
}
  • krystan is there a reason you made x and y bytes when one could consider them integers? I don't see the advantage of making x and y bytes means the author could be limited based on the cord system they have choosen. – Security Hound Nov 10 '10 at 20:33
  • I made it a byte because a char is one byte big and it is habit for me (when writing code quickly) to do this, it would perhaps be better to make them a char type as that is actually what is represented in the xml, so I take on board your improvement to change the type to char will make no difference the code will still function, you are correct to say making it a byte will limit the author and you can always cast to byte if you must, just a quirk of writing code quickly on the train :) I have updated the example to this effect, makes for a better example... thanks. – krystan honour Nov 10 '10 at 20:39
  • How embarrasing, sorry I meant int not char, thats what comes of doing two coding answers at once, int is of course better in this example given what the object represents. – krystan honour Nov 10 '10 at 20:49
0

You could using a DeSerialize function that return the object type like this example:

public T DeSerializeFromString<T>(string data)
        {
            T result;
            StringReader rdr = null;
            try
            {
                rdr = new StringReader(data);
                XmlSerializer xmlSerializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
                result = (T)xmlSerializer.Deserialize(rdr);
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                throw;
            }
            finally
            {
                rdr.Close();
            }
            return result;
        }

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