6

In my application I am using multiple threads for some time consuming task, that is intended to run for the whole duration f the application. What I am trying to achieve is some nice and clean approach to kill the loop in second thread just before exiting app, so I can clean after loop and then close everything.

So far I've come up with this approach, but to be honest I am not huge fan of it:

#include <iostream>
#include <thread>

bool stop_flag;

void foo()
{
    while(!stop_flag)
    {
        //do something
    }
    clean_after();
}

int main()
{
    stop_flag = false;
    std::thread whileThread(foo);

    // app lifetime

    stop_flag = true;   
    whileThread.join();
    return 0;
}
  • 3
    "I am not huge fan of it" - that's right, you don't want to be a fan of a broken solution :-) – Sergey Kalinichenko Jan 4 '17 at 18:38
4

reading and writing to the same un-synchronized variable from multiple thread is anyway undefined behavior. Fan or not, the compiler may just optimize the check away and the loop may never start or never end.

as answered before, you can use std::atomic_bool. I'm not a fan of doing it globally - pass it to foo as its "cancellation token".

void foo(std::atomic_bool& cancellation_token)
{
    while(!cancellationToken)
    {
        //do something
    }
    clean_after();
}
  • I've got to say that the idea of passing it to the foo also looks better for me in this case. – sebap123 Jan 4 '17 at 18:42
  • Passing it as an argument makes it harder to stop the thread from more than one place. – Pete Becker Jan 4 '17 at 20:16
11

With just a slight change, your code will be fine:

std::atomic<bool> stop_flag;

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