209

I am currently struggling with nesting routes using react router v4.

The closest example was the route config in the React-Router v4 Documentation.

I want to split my app in 2 different parts.

A frontend and an admin area.

I was thinking about something like this:

<Match pattern="/" component={Frontpage}>
  <Match pattern="/home" component={HomePage} />
  <Match pattern="/about" component={AboutPage} />
</Match>
<Match pattern="/admin" component={Backend}>
  <Match pattern="/home" component={Dashboard} />
  <Match pattern="/users" component={UserPage} />
</Match>
<Miss component={NotFoundPage} />

The frontend has a different layout and style than the admin area. So within the frontpage the route home, about and so one should be the child routes.

/home should be rendered into the Frontpage component and /admin/home should be rendered within the Backend component.

I tried some variations but I always ended in not hitting /home or /admin/home.

Edit - 19.04.2017

Because this post has a lot of views right now I updated it with the final solution. I hope it helps someone.

Edit - 08.05.2017

Removed old solutions

Final solution:

This is the final solution I am using right now. This example also has a global error component like a traditional 404 page.

import React, { Component } from 'react';
import { Switch, Route, Redirect, Link } from 'react-router-dom';

const Home = () => <div><h1>Home</h1></div>;
const User = () => <div><h1>User</h1></div>;
const Error = () => <div><h1>Error</h1></div>

const Frontend = props => {
  console.log('Frontend');
  return (
    <div>
      <h2>Frontend</h2>
      <p><Link to="/">Root</Link></p>
      <p><Link to="/user">User</Link></p>
      <p><Link to="/admin">Backend</Link></p>
      <p><Link to="/the-route-is-swiggity-swoute">Swiggity swooty</Link></p>
      <Switch>
        <Route exact path='/' component={Home}/>
        <Route path='/user' component={User}/>
        <Redirect to={{
          state: { error: true }
        }} />
      </Switch>
      <footer>Bottom</footer>
    </div>
  );
}

const Backend = props => {
  console.log('Backend');
  return (
    <div>
      <h2>Backend</h2>
      <p><Link to="/admin">Root</Link></p>
      <p><Link to="/admin/user">User</Link></p>
      <p><Link to="/">Frontend</Link></p>
      <p><Link to="/admin/the-route-is-swiggity-swoute">Swiggity swooty</Link></p>
      <Switch>
        <Route exact path='/admin' component={Home}/>
        <Route path='/admin/user' component={User}/>
        <Redirect to={{
          state: { error: true }
        }} />
      </Switch>
      <footer>Bottom</footer>
    </div>
  );
}

class GlobalErrorSwitch extends Component {
  previousLocation = this.props.location

  componentWillUpdate(nextProps) {
    const { location } = this.props;

    if (nextProps.history.action !== 'POP'
      && (!location.state || !location.state.error)) {
        this.previousLocation = this.props.location
    };
  }

  render() {
    const { location } = this.props;
    const isError = !!(
      location.state &&
      location.state.error &&
      this.previousLocation !== location // not initial render
    )

    return (
      <div>
        {          
          isError
          ? <Route component={Error} />
          : <Switch location={isError ? this.previousLocation : location}>
              <Route path="/admin" component={Backend} />
              <Route path="/" component={Frontend} />
            </Switch>}
      </div>
    )
  }
}

class App extends Component {
  render() {
    return <Route component={GlobalErrorSwitch} />
  }
}

export default App;
  • 1
    Thank you for updating your question with the final answer! just a suggestion: maybe you could keep only the 4th listing and the first, since the other ones are using outdated versions of the api and are distracting from the answer – Giuliano Vilela May 4 '17 at 19:35
  • lol, I have no idea what format this date is: 08.05.2017 I suggest you use the universal ISO8601 format for dates if you don't want to confuse people. is 08 the month or day? ISO8601 = year.month.day hour.minute.second (progressively more granular) – wesm Jul 25 '17 at 17:17
  • Nice updated final solution, but I think you don't need the previousLocation logic. – tudorpavel Nov 15 '17 at 17:53
  • what's the motivation for completely rewriting react router. It better be a good reason – Oliver Watkins Apr 7 '18 at 14:43
  • It's the declarative approach. So you can set up your routings as you would use react components. – datoml Apr 7 '18 at 15:39
251

In react-router-v4 you don't nest <Routes />. Instead, you put them inside another <Component />.


For instance

<Route path='/topics' component={Topics}>
  <Route path='/topics/:topicId' component={Topic} />
</Route>

should become

<Route path='/topics' component={Topics} />

with

const Topics = ({ match }) => (
  <div>
    <h2>Topics</h2>
    <Link to={`${match.url}/exampleTopicId`}>
      Example topic
    </Link>
    <Route path={`${match.url}/:topicId`} component={Topic}/>
  </div>
) 

Here is a basic example straight from the react-router documentation.

  • 8
    can you make Topics component into a class? and where is the 'match' parameter came in? in the render()? – user1076813 Apr 25 '17 at 6:37
  • 3
    thanks @leo, i've accessed the 'match' in props – user1076813 Apr 29 '17 at 1:02
  • 8
    Seems ridiculous you can't just to="exampleTopicId" with the ${match.url} being implicit. – greenimpala May 4 '17 at 11:45
  • 7
    You can have nested routes per docs reacttraining.com/react-router/web/example/route-config. This would allow for centralized route config as per the topic in the docs. Think how insane this would be to manage in a larger project if unavailable. – JustDave Aug 15 '17 at 14:16
  • 3
    These are not nested routes, it's a one-level routing still using the render property of a Route which takes a functional component as an input, look more carefully, there is no nesting in the sense of react router < 4. RouteWithSubRoutes is a one-level list of routes that use pattern matching. – Lyubomir Aug 15 '17 at 15:54
45

It's true that in order to nest Routes you need to place them in the child component of the Route.

However if you prefer a more inline syntax rather than breaking your Routes up across components, you can provide a functional component to the render prop of the Route you want to nest under.

<BrowserRouter>

  <Route path="/" component={Frontpage} exact />
  <Route path="/home" component={HomePage} />
  <Route path="/about" component={AboutPage} />

  <Route
    path="/admin"
    render={({ match: { url } }) => (
      <>
        <Route path={`${url}/`} component={Backend} exact />
        <Route path={`${url}/home`} component={Dashboard} />
        <Route path={`${url}/users`} component={UserPage} />
      </>
    )}
  />

</BrowserRouter>

If you're interested in why the render prop should be used, and not the component prop, it's because it stops the inline functional component from being remounted on every render. See the documentation for more detail.

Note that the example wraps the nested Routes in a Fragment. Prior to React 16, you can use a container <div> instead.

  • 5
    Thank god the only solution that is sorta clear, mantainable and works as expected. I wish react router 3 nested routes were back. – Merunas Grincalaitis Sep 24 '18 at 16:55
  • this one perfect looks like angular route-outlet – Partha Ranjan Mar 3 at 15:58
  • This should be the accepted answer. – EmptyCup Mar 13 at 5:18
  • You should use match.path, not match.url. The former is usually used in the Route path prop; the latter when you push a new route (e.g. Link to prop) – nbkhope Mar 29 at 18:40
43

Just wanted to mention react-router v4 changed radically since this question was posted/answed.

There is no <Match> component any more! <Switch>is to make sure only the first match is rendered. <Redirect> well .. redirects to another route. Use or leave out exact to either in- or exclude a partial match.

See the docs. They are great. https://reacttraining.com/react-router/

Here's an example I hope is useable to answer your question.

  <Router>
   <div>
   <Redirect exact from='/' to='/front'/>
   <Route path="/" render={() => {
    return (
      <div>
      <h2>Home menu</h2>
      <Link to="/front">front</Link>
      <Link to="/back">back</Link>
      </div>
    );
  }} />          
  <Route path="/front" render={() => {
    return (
      <div>
      <h2>front menu</h2>
      <Link to="/front/help">help</Link>
      <Link to="/front/about">about</Link>
      </div>
    );
  }} />
  <Route exact path="/front/help" render={() => {
    return <h2>front help</h2>;
  }} />
  <Route exact path="/front/about" render={() => {
    return <h2>front about</h2>;
  }} />
  <Route path="/back" render={() => {
    return (
      <div>
      <h2>back menu</h2>
      <Link to="/back/help">help</Link>
      <Link to="/back/about">about</Link>
      </div>
    );
  }} />
  <Route exact path="/back/help" render={() => {
    return <h2>back help</h2>;
  }} />
  <Route exact path="/back/about" render={() => {
    return <h2>back about</h2>;
  }} />
</div>

Hope it helped, let me know. If this example is not answering your question well enough, tell me and I'll see if I can modify it.

  • There are no exact on Redirect reacttraining.com/react-router/web/api/Redirect That would be a lot cleaner than <Route exact path="/" render={() => <Redirect to="/path" />} /> that I am doing instead. At least it won't let me with TypeScript. – Filuren Mar 23 '17 at 1:16
  • 2
    Do i understand correctly that there is no such thing as nested/sub routes (anymore)? do i need to duplicate the base route in all the routes? Doesn't react-router 4 provide any help for structuring routes in maintainable manner? – Ville Apr 2 '17 at 13:21
  • 4
    @Ville I'm astonished; did you find a better solution? I don't want to have routes all over the place, gosh – punkbit May 22 '17 at 12:02
  • this will work but make sure you have the public path set to "/" in webpack config for the bundle.js, otherwise the nested routes wont work on page refresh. – vikrant Oct 10 '17 at 8:41
4

Some thing like this.

import React from 'react';
import {
  BrowserRouter as Router, Route, NavLink, Switch, Link
} from 'react-router-dom';

import '../assets/styles/App.css';

const Home = () =>
  <NormalNavLinks>
    <h1>HOME</h1>
  </NormalNavLinks>;
const About = () =>
  <NormalNavLinks>
    <h1>About</h1>
  </NormalNavLinks>;
const Help = () =>
  <NormalNavLinks>
    <h1>Help</h1>
  </NormalNavLinks>;

const AdminHome = () =>
  <AdminNavLinks>
    <h1>root</h1>
  </AdminNavLinks>;

const AdminAbout = () =>
  <AdminNavLinks>
    <h1>Admin about</h1>
  </AdminNavLinks>;

const AdminHelp = () =>
  <AdminNavLinks>
    <h1>Admin Help</h1>
  </AdminNavLinks>;


const AdminNavLinks = (props) => (
  <div>
    <h2>Admin Menu</h2>
    <NavLink exact to="/admin">Admin Home</NavLink>
    <NavLink to="/admin/help">Admin Help</NavLink>
    <NavLink to="/admin/about">Admin About</NavLink>
    <Link to="/">Home</Link>
    {props.children}
  </div>
);

const NormalNavLinks = (props) => (
  <div>
    <h2>Normal Menu</h2>
    <NavLink exact to="/">Home</NavLink>
    <NavLink to="/help">Help</NavLink>
    <NavLink to="/about">About</NavLink>
    <Link to="/admin">Admin</Link>
    {props.children}
  </div>
);

const App = () => (
  <Router>
    <div>
      <Switch>
        <Route exact path="/" component={Home}/>
        <Route path="/help" component={Help}/>
        <Route path="/about" component={About}/>

        <Route exact path="/admin" component={AdminHome}/>
        <Route path="/admin/help" component={AdminHelp}/>
        <Route path="/admin/about" component={AdminAbout}/>
      </Switch>

    </div>
  </Router>
);


export default App;

  • 8
    That's not nested... – TimoSolo Oct 16 '17 at 10:04
1

You can try something like Routes.js

import React, { Component } from 'react'
import { BrowserRouter as Router, Route } from 'react-router-dom';
import FrontPage from './FrontPage';
import Dashboard from './Dashboard';
import AboutPage from './AboutPage';
import Backend from './Backend';
import Homepage from './Homepage';
import UserPage from './UserPage';
class Routes extends Component {
    render() {
        return (
            <div>
                <Route exact path="/" component={FrontPage} />
                <Route exact path="/home" component={Homepage} />
                <Route exact path="/about" component={AboutPage} />
                <Route exact path="/admin" component={Backend} />
                <Route exact path="/admin/home" component={Dashboard} />
                <Route exact path="/users" component={UserPage} />    
            </div>
        )
    }
}

export default Routes

App.js

import React, { Component } from 'react';
import logo from './logo.svg';
import './App.css';
import { BrowserRouter as Router, Route } from 'react-router-dom'
import Routes from './Routes';

class App extends Component {
  render() {
    return (
      <div className="App">
      <Router>
        <Routes/>
      </Router>
      </div>
    );
  }
}

export default App;

I think you can achieve the same from here also.

  • good point! I thought same way when started with React after Java Spring boot app development. the only thing that I'd change is 'div' to 'Switch' in Routes.js. And tbh, you can define all routes in App.js but wrap it outside in index.js file for example (create-react-app) – Reborn Apr 2 '18 at 20:10
  • Yes, you are right! I have implemented this way that's why I am mentioning this method. – Aniruddh Agarwal Apr 2 '18 at 20:15
0

Here I've created an example in TSX, if someone wants to get rid of prefix of wrapper route in child route path: https://stackoverflow.com/a/47891060/5517306

-6
interface IDefaultLayoutProps {
    children: React.ReactNode
}

const DefaultLayout: React.SFC<IDefaultLayoutProps> = ({children}) => {
    return (
        <div className="DefaultLayout">
            {children}
        </div>
    );
}


const LayoutRoute: React.SFC<IDefaultLayoutRouteProps & RouteProps> = ({component: Component, layout: Layout, ...rest}) => {
const handleRender = (matchProps: RouteComponentProps<{}, StaticContext>) => (
        <Layout>
            <Component {...matchProps} />
        </Layout>
    );

    return (
        <Route {...rest} render={handleRender}/>
    );
}

const ScreenRouter = () => (
    <BrowserRouter>
        <div>
            <Link to="/">Home</Link>
            <Link to="/counter">Counter</Link>
            <Switch>
                <LayoutRoute path="/" exact={true} layout={DefaultLayout} component={HomeScreen} />
                <LayoutRoute path="/counter" layout={DashboardLayout} component={CounterScreen} />
            </Switch>
        </div>
    </BrowserRouter>
);

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