9

I've found this piece of code used several times (also a similar one where it's used open() instead of write()).

int c = write(fd, &v, sizeof(v));
if (c == -1 && errno != EINTR) {
    perror("Write to output file");
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
}

Why it is checked if && errno != EINTR here ?

Looking for errno on man I found the following text about EINTR, but even if I visited man 7 signal that doesn't enlighten me.

EINTR Interrupted function call (POSIX.1); see signal(7).

  • 2
    Check the man page for write instead. It should tell you what errno is set to on certain errors. – Kevin Jan 4 '17 at 22:33
  • 1
    Note also that write() returns ssize_t, and NOT int. They are not the same. – Andrew Henle Jan 5 '17 at 0:04
  • 1
    Thank you both! @AndrewHenle I know it, I just decided to copy the piece of code as I found it :) do you think I should edit the question all the same with ssize_t instead of int? – Robb1 Jan 5 '17 at 9:23
16

Many system calls will report the EINTR error code if a signal occurred while the system call was in progress. No error actually occurred, it's just reported that way because the system isn't able to resume the system call automatically. This coding pattern simply retries the system call when this happens, to ignore the interrupt.

For instance, this might happen if the program makes use of alarm() to run some code asynchronously when a timer runs out. If the timeout occurs while the program is calling write(), we just want to restart it.

1

From the man page on write:

The call was interrupted by a signal before any data was written

  • 2
    This answer is not really sufficient; it doesn't explain the situations under which EINTR can (or more importantly, can't) happen. I consider the latter more important because failure to understand that it usually can't happen is a cause of endless cargo-culting. – R.. Jan 4 '17 at 22:52
  • @R.. This answer is not really sufficient; it doesn't explain the situations under which EINTR can (or more importantly, can't) happen. I consider the latter more important because failure to understand that it usually can't happen is a cause of endless cargo-culting. If you don't "cargo cult" system calls, changing something like the signal mask of a process can break things anywhere. If you like writing fragile code that can be broken by something completely unrelated, that's your choice. But please don't characterize writing robust code as "cargo-culting". – Andrew Henle Jan 5 '17 at 0:02
  • @AndrewHenle: Installing an interrupting signal handler is an invasive and intentional thing you do when you want to error-out of blocking syscalls that get interrupted. Looping to repeat when that happens does not make sense in general, only when you know you really want that behavior. – R.. Jan 5 '17 at 2:46
  • @R.. can you explain (or perhaps just link to an explanation of) a situation that might lead to such a signal handler being a sensible option? – bmcorser Oct 9 '18 at 1:30
1

the answers here are really good and i want to add some internal details :

System calls that are interrupted by signals can either abort and return EINTR or automatically restart themselves if and only if SA_RESTART is specified in sigaction(2)

and the one responsible for this task is the restart_block which used to track information and arguments for restarting system calls

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