4

I'm running telnet command on a host for a given port (which is open), it returns 0 (success).

For trying telnet manually, I type the following command, then I press control+bracket i.e. ^], then press Enter key, then I get to telnet> prompt, where if I type close or quit, it comes back to the $ prompt and seeing exit status of last command shows 0 for (success) as port 2878 is open (as per the telnet command's output).

[vagrant@myvagrant /tmp] $ telnet `hostname` 2878
Trying 127.0.0.1...
Connected to myvagrant.
Escape character is '^]'.
^]

telnet> close
Connection closed.
[vagrant@myvagrant /tmp] $ echo $?
0

Now, I wanted to run the same operation without any human intervention i.e. I don't want to manually give ^] and press Enter key to come to the telnet> prompt, then enter close (or quit) telnet command to finally come back to the $ prompt.

For this, I tried using echo -e command's option and giving ^], \n (for new line character i.e. Enter key) and close command (for telnet> prompt so that I come back to $ prompt). Doing this, kind of worked as expected but for the exit status of last command echo $?, I'm getting 1 (instead of 0). Why?

[vagrant@myvagrant /tmp] $ echo -e "^]\nclose" | telnet `hostname` 2878
Trying 127.0.0.1...
Connected to myvagrant.
Escape character is '^]'.
Connection closed by foreign host.
[vagrant@myvagrant /tmp] $ 
[vagrant@myvagrant /tmp] $ echo $?
1
[vagrant@myvagrant /tmp] $ 

or tried the here-doc method as well, but not sure why it's returning 1 (as exit code) for a valid port which is open.

[vagrant@myvagrant /tmp] $ telnet `hostname` 2878 <<GIGA
> echo ^]
> echo close
> GIGA
Trying 127.0.0.1...
Connected to myvagrant.
Escape character is '^]'.
Connection closed by foreign host.
[vagrant@myvagrant ~/aks/always-latest-ws-sunny] $ echo $?
1
[vagrant@myvagrant ~/aks/always-latest-ws-sunny] $

How can I automatically exit from telnet if the port is open and get 0 as exit code? If there's a way to capture the output of the previous command, may be I can grep the 'Connection closed by foreign host.' string to mark it successful (0).

4

A slight improvement to the answer provided by Matthew above which allows you to use it inside shell scripts:

$ echo -e '\x1dclose\x0d' | telnet google.com 80
Connected to google.com.
Escape character is '^]'.

telnet> close
Connection closed.
$ echo $?
0
  • Matthew's answer doesn't work for me. This one works. I am still surprised why. – Vishal Jun 20 '19 at 11:11
  • Work for me beautifully! – Nam G VU Jan 9 at 5:10
0

You may need other linux package like expect to achieve what you want.

  • Yes, expect is prob. the way to go. "Expect is a tool for automating interactive applications according to a script. Following the script, Expect knows what can be expected from a program and what the correct response should be." – Roadowl Jan 5 '17 at 2:11
0

Without using Expect, I guess using the HERE document (<

[vagrant@myvagrant /tmp] $ telnet_result=$(telnet `hostname` 2878 <<GIGA
echo ^]
echo close
GIGA
); echo $telnet_result | grep "Escape character is '^]'"; echo $?
Connection closed by foreign host.
 Escape character is '^]'.
0
[vagrant@myvagrant /tmp] $ 

and for a bad/invalid/non-open port, the same gives 1 (as expected).

[vagrant@myvagrant /tmp] $ telnet_result=$(telnet `hostname` 287811111 <<GIGA
echo ^]
echo close
GIGA
); echo $telnet_result | grep "Escape character is '^]'"; echo $?
telnet: connect to address 127.0.0.1: Connection refused
1
[vagrant@myvagrant /tmp] $ 
  • Nah, I don't like this solution that much, but it's working as I used 2-3 operations at least. – Arun Sangal Jan 6 '17 at 0:46
0
╭─ ~
╰» echo "^]close^M" | telnet localhost 22; echo $?
Trying 127.0.0.1...
Connected to localhost.
Escape character is '^]'.

telnet> close
Connection closed.
0

To enter the ^] and ^M characters, press ctrl+v ctrt+] and ctrl+v ctrl+m respectively.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.