40

You print an enum that implements Stringer using "%v", it will print its string value. If you declare the same enum inside a struct and print the struct using "%v", it will print enum's numeric value. Is there a way to print the string value of a enum field?

Sample (https://play.golang.org/p/AP_tzzAZMI):

package main

import (
    "fmt"
)

type MyEnum int

const (
    Foo MyEnum = 1
    Bar MyEnum = 2
)

func (e MyEnum) String() string {
    switch e {
    case Foo:
        return "Foo"
    case Bar:
        return "Bar"
    default:
        return fmt.Sprintf("%d", int(e))
    }
}

type MyStruct struct {
    field MyEnum
}

func main() {
    info := &MyStruct{
        field: MyEnum(1),
    }
    fmt.Printf("%v\n", MyEnum(1))
    fmt.Printf("%v\n", info)
    fmt.Printf("%+v\n", info)
    fmt.Printf("%#v\n", info)
}

Prints:

Foo
&{1}
&{field:1}
&main.MyStruct{field:1}
4
  • This is a dup of stackoverflow.com/questions/27187132/… , there is no way to get the name of the enum in go, you need to create a lut with a tool like stringify
    – GarMan
    Commented Jan 5, 2017 at 8:58
  • @GarMan The question is not about how to write or generate the String() method, it's about he already added the String(), yet the fmt package doesn't call it when an instance of a wrapper struct (or a pointer to it) is printed.
    – icza
    Commented Jan 5, 2017 at 9:28
  • 1
    @Gatis you need to export the field. I have added the answer with a sample.Please check and if it solves your problem accept it Commented Jan 5, 2017 at 9:36
  • My bad, I misread, @Sarathsp's answer is correct please accept it.
    – GarMan
    Commented Jan 6, 2017 at 20:17

6 Answers 6

33

You need to make the field exported,ie you may declare the struct as

type MyStruct struct {
    Field MyEnum
}

Here is a sample program with exported and unexported fields

Code

package main

import (
    "fmt"
)

type MyEnum int

const (
    Foo MyEnum = 1
    Bar MyEnum = 2
)

func (e MyEnum) String() string {
    switch e {
    case Foo:
        return "Foo"
    case Bar:
        return "Bar"
    default:
        return fmt.Sprintf("%d", int(e))
    }
}

type MyStruct struct {
    Field1 MyEnum
    field2 MyEnum
}

func main() {
    info := &MyStruct{
        Field1: MyEnum(1),
        field2: MyEnum(2),
    }
    fmt.Printf("%v\n", MyEnum(1))
    fmt.Printf("%v\n", info)
    fmt.Printf("%+v\n", info)
    fmt.Printf("%#v\n", info)
}

Output

Foo
&{Foo 2}
&{Field1:Foo field2:2}
&main.MyStruct{Field1:1, field2:2}

Here is play link : https://play.golang.org/p/7knxM4KbLh

1
  • 5
    if you want '%#v' also to show the string you need to implement 'fmt.GoStringer' Commented Jan 5, 2017 at 13:02
16

I am going to expand on the accepted answer a little with this method:

type MyEnum int

const (
    Foo MyEnum = iota
    Bar
)

func (me MyEnum) String() string {
    return [...]string{"Foo", "Bar"}[me]
}

// ...

fmt.Println(Foo, Bar)  // Prints: Foo Bar

The above code assumes that the enum values starts from 0, which works out nicely because the first element in the array in the method String can be referenced by the enum value directly.

But the first enum value in the original question has a value of 1. We can modify it the method accordingly.

const (
    Foo MyEnum = iota + 1
    Bar
)

func (me MyEnum) String() string {
    return [...]string{"", "Foo", "Bar"}[me]
}

Here's the playlink: https://play.golang.org/p/6pmyVlsAeV2

3
  • 1
    Can you explain the ellipsis used here? [...] string { "a", "b", "c" } [n] appears to give me the same result as without the ellipsis [] string { "a", "b", "c" } [n] So I am not sure what purpose the ellipsis is serving.
    – giles
    Commented May 4, 2021 at 23:42
  • 4
    Yes. Both [...] string { "a", "b", "c" } [n] and [] string { "a", "b", "c" } [n] give the same result. The difference is the former creates an array and the latter a slice. This declares a slice: a := string { "a", "b", "c" }. This declares an array of 2: b := [3]string{ "a", "b", "c" }. This is the same as the previous except you let Go compiler to do the counting of elements for you: b := [...]string{ "a", "b", "c" } . Reference: blog.golang.org/slices-intro
    – Cybersam
    Commented May 7, 2021 at 18:20
  • 2
    This way, you'll be creating a slice on every call to the function. Either define this mapping as a global object or use a switch. Else, the memory's gonna blow if there are a large number of threads trying to use the enum object's string. Commented May 13, 2021 at 15:55
12

Use stringer. It is an integral part of the Golang tool chain and is made specifically for this task.

0

You might want to use a standard enumerator package as mentioned in godocs: https://godoc.org/github.com/alvaroloes/enumer

PS: There are some forks which have worked on the above project. But for your requirement, this should be sufficient.

0

All you have to do is to implement String method on the type that defines the ENUM

take a look at this example

package main

import "fmt"

// Day is the type that represents the day
// and  here will be an alias of unit8
type Day uint8

// Enum of week days
const (
    InvalidDay Day = iota // invalid day will be 0
    Monday
    Tuesday
    Wednesday
    Thursday
    Friday
    Saturday
    Sunday
)

// String method is responsible for how enum values
// will be converted to string and printed
// it will be called by default when you call fmt.Println()
// or other formatting functions
func (d Day) String() string {
    switch d {
    case Monday:
        return "Monday"
    case Tuesday:
        return "Tuesday"
    case Wednesday:
        return "Wednesday"
    case Thursday:
        return "Thursday"
    case Friday:
        return "Friday"
    case Saturday:
        return "Saturday"
    case Sunday:
        return "Sunday"
    default:
        return "Invalid Week Day"
    }
}

func main() {
    fmt.Printf("My favourite day is: %v\n", Monday) // My favourite day is: Monday
}
0

Not an exact answer to the question. But there are no in-built functions for enums in Go. I use the following method which is less verbose. It may or may not work for all. In my enums package, I create constants with the enum name prefixed. Like AuthTypeGoogle, AuthTypeApple. These constants are string type and PascalCase so that it is exported automatically.

package enums

const (
    AuthTypeGoogle = "Google"
    AuthTypeApple  = "Apple"
    AuthTypePhone  = "Phone"
)

const (
    UserTypePerson   = "Person"
    UserTypeHr       = "Hr"
    UserTypeEmployee = "Employee"
)

Now I import the enum package and use it like if(userTypeValue == enums.UserTypePerson) and that's it. What I'm concerned about is done.

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