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I've got a Pandas dataframe named clean which contains a column v for which I would like to draw a histogram and superimpose a density plot. I know I can plot one under the other this way:

import pandas as pd
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

Maxv=200

plt.subplot(211)
plt.hist(clean['v'],bins=40, range=(0, Maxv), color='g')
plt.ylabel("Number")

plt.subplot(212)
ax=clean['v'].plot(kind='density')
ax.set_xlim(0, Maxv)
plt.xlabel("Orbital velocity (km/s)")
ax.get_yaxis().set_visible(False)

enter image description here

But when I try to superimpose, y scales doesn't match (and I loose y axis ticks and labels):

yhist, xhist, _hist = plt.hist(clean['v'],bins=40, range=(0, Maxv), color='g')
plt.ylabel("Number")

ax=clean['v'].plot(kind='density') #I would like to insert here a normalization to max(yhist)/max(ax)
ax.set_xlim(0, Maxv)
plt.xlabel("Orbital velocity (km/s)")
ax.get_yaxis().set_visible(False)

enter image description here

Some hint? (Additional question: how can I change the width of density smoothing?)

9
  • 1
    this answer should help
    – piRSquared
    Commented Jan 5, 2017 at 9:50
  • Yes it does, thank you. I just have to find away of setting x range size and hiding the second y-axis... Thank you!
    – Matt
    Commented Jan 5, 2017 at 9:54
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    @Matt without the data it's hard to say, but yes, seaborn is meant to make difficult things easy ;)
    – IanS
    Commented Jan 5, 2017 at 10:04
  • 1
    @IanS I'm looking at your seaborn lik, it may be a very good option too. Thanks!
    – Matt
    Commented Jan 5, 2017 at 10:18
  • 1
    Seaborn has a top-level function that does exactly this: seaborn.pydata.org/examples/distplot_options.html
    – Paul H
    Commented Jan 6, 2017 at 17:36

3 Answers 3

5

Based on your code, this should work:

ax = clean.v.plot(kind='hist', bins=40, normed=True)
clean.v.plot(kind='kde', ax=ax, secondary_y=True)
ax.set(xlim=[0, Maxv])

You might not even need the secondary_y anymore.

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  • Very clean. I've actually got rid of the secondary_y . The only thing is that I've lost the real count (from hist) in y, which is now normalized, but I guess that's fine too.
    – Matt
    Commented Jan 5, 2017 at 10:22
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No I try this:

ax = clean.v.plot(kind='hist', bins=40, range=(0, Maxv))
clean.v.plot(kind='kde', ax=ax, secondary_y=True)

But the range part doesn't work, and ther's still the left y-axis problem

enter image description here

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  • 1
    Try setting the range after plotting: ax.set(xlim=[0, Maxv])
    – IanS
    Commented Jan 5, 2017 at 10:08
  • For the left y-axis see this answer.
    – IanS
    Commented Jan 5, 2017 at 10:11
  • @IanS: thank you very much, it works for the range. :) I haven't succeeded with y-axis, though, but I guess it is less important.
    – Matt
    Commented Jan 5, 2017 at 10:15
  • Yes it did (I had answered to your answer :) ), but as I've said, I've lost the real histogram count of objects in y.
    – Matt
    Commented Jan 5, 2017 at 10:31
1

Seaborn makes this easy

import seaborn as sns
sns.distplot(df['numeric_column'],bins=25)

enter image description here

1
  • Very true indeed. I was very beginner when I asked this question. Seaborn is very useful! :)
    – Matt
    Commented May 19, 2020 at 12:36

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