2

Problem: convert a given decimal number to binary and count the consecutive 1s and display it

Sample Case 1: The binary representation of 5 is 101, so the maximum number of consecutive 1's is 1.

Sample Case 2: The binary representation of 13 is 1101 , so the maximum number of consecutive 1's is 2.

Solution:

#!/bin/python3

import sys


n = int(input().strip())
result = []
counter = 1
def get_binary(num):
    if num == 1:
        result.append(num)
        adj(result)
    else:
        result.append(num%2)
        get_binary(int(num/2))

def adj(arr):
    global counter
    for x in range(0,len(arr)-1):
        if arr[x] == 1 and (arr[x] == arr[x+1]):
            counter += 1
    print(counter)

get_binary(n)

It doesn't pass all the sample test cases. What am I doing wrong?

  • 2
    try with 115. You'll get 5, you need 3. You're counting all the arrays of 1, while you must retain the longest one. – Jean-François Fabre Jan 5 '17 at 20:57
  • What cases doesn't it pass? What does it do in those cases? Please show these, as required by the posting guidelines. – Prune Jan 5 '17 at 20:57
  • also this shouldn't matter with your test cases but your binary is backwards – depperm Jan 5 '17 at 20:59
  • 1
    @Jean-FrançoisFabre I get 4 with this code. – roganjosh Jan 5 '17 at 21:00
  • 1
    oh that's because the last 1s string is counted wrong. 4 indeed. Doubly wrong. – Jean-François Fabre Jan 5 '17 at 21:03
9

below is an simplified version that works

def func(num):
  return max(map(len, bin(num)[2:].split('0')))
  • convert integer to binary representation bin(num)

  • strips 0b from the binary representation bin(num)[:2]

  • split the string on character 0 bin(num)[2:].split('0')

  • find the string that has the maximum length and return the number

  • @Jean-FrançoisFabre I updated the answer with the explanation – rogue-one Jan 5 '17 at 21:09
  • I like that better. I'm out of upvotes right now (no kidding). Can you try changing the lambda with a simple len ? Will be even clearer. – Jean-François Fabre Jan 5 '17 at 21:18
  • @Jean-FrançoisFabre done!! thanks for the idea.. :) – rogue-one Jan 5 '17 at 21:32
  • now your post is beginning to look like something good :) Those binary manipulation questions always end up by converting to a binary string and manipulate strings. This always frustrated me since I wanted to do everything with bit shifting... – Jean-François Fabre Jan 5 '17 at 21:34
  • BTW I couldn't resist editing your answer to add the return statement :) – Jean-François Fabre Jan 5 '17 at 21:35
0

Here is an alternative solution using regex:

>>> import re
>>> def bn(i):
...     n = bin(i)[2:]
...     return n,max(len(j) for j in re.findall(r'1+', n))
...
>>>
>>> bn(13)
('1101', 2)
>>> bn(25)
('11001', 2)
0

Your counter logic is incorrect in a couple of respects, M. Fabre identified the main one. The result is that you count the total quantity of follow-on 1s in all sequences combined, and add 1 from the initial value of counter. rogue-one gave you a lovely Pythonic solution. To repair this at your level of use, go into adj and fix ...

  1. You don't use counter outside the function; keep it local.
  2. Make a second variable that's the best string you've found so far.
  3. Use counter for the current string; when you hit a 0, compare against the best so far, reset counter, and keep going.\

The central logic is something like ...

best = 0
counter = 0
for bit in arr:
    if bit == 1:
        counter += 1
    else:
        if counter > best:
            best = counter
        counter = 0

# After this loop, make one last check, in case you were on the longest
#   run of 1s when you hit the end of the bits.
# I'll leave that coding to you.
0

Some clever answers in here, thought I'd add an alternative using a traditional efficient imperative approach.

This method first converts the number to a string binary representation. From there it updates a stack of longest values, and does a check to see if there is a longer value to be added. Thus you end up with a stack of values that are sorted by longest consecutive 1's. To choose the maximum, simply pop() from the stack.

def longest_consecutive_one(n):
    stack = [0]
    counter = 0
    binary_num = '{0:08b}'.format(n)
    length = len(binary_num) - 1
    for index, character in enumerate(binary_num):
        if character == "1":
            counter += 1
        if character == '0' or index == length:
            if stack[-1] < counter:
                stack.append(counter)
                counter = 0
    return stack.pop()

Sample Output:

>>> longest_consecutive_one(190)
5
>>> longest_consecutive_one(10)
1
>>> longest_consecutive_one(10240)
1
>>> longest_consecutive_one(210231)
6
0

Output of below written code will give maximum number of consecutive one's in input decimal number.

    n = int(raw_input().strip())
    num = list((bin(n).split('b'))[1])
    num.insert(0,'0')
    num.append('0')
    count = 0
    store = 0
    for i in range(0,len(num)):
        if ((num[i]) == '1'):
            count+=1
        elif ('0' == (num[i])) and count !=0:
            if count >= store:
                store = count
            count = 0
    print store
0

this one uses bit magic

def maxConsecutiveOnes(x): 

    # Initialize result 
    count = 0

    # Count the number of iterations to 
    # reach x = 0. 
    while (x!=0): 

        # This operation reduces length 
        # of every sequence of 1s by one. 
        x = (x & (x << 1)) 

        count=count+1

    return count 

# Driver code 
print(maxConsecutiveOnes(14)) 
print(maxConsecutiveOnes(222))

the output will be 3 and 4

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