21

Here is the question:

I have a file with these words:

hey how are you
I am fine and you
Yes I am fine

And it is asked to find the number of words, lines and characters.

Below is my program, but the number of counts for the characters without space is not correct.

The number of words is correct and the number of line is correct. What is the mistake in the same loop?

fname = input("Enter the name of the file:")
infile = open(fname, 'r')
lines = 0
words = 0
characters = 0
for line in infile:
    wordslist = line.split()
    lines = lines + 1
    words = words + len(wordslist)
    characters = characters + len(line)
print(lines)
print(words)
print(characters)

The output is:

lines=3(Correct)
words=13(correct)
characters=47

I've looked on the site with multiple answers and I am confused because I didn't learn some other functions in Python. How do I correct the code as simple and basic as it is in the loop I've done?

Whereas the number of characters without space is 35 and with space is 45. If possible, I want to find the number of characters without space. Even if someone know the loop for the number of characters with space that's fine.

  • 2
    It is probably counting new line characters. Subtract characters with (lines+1) – Loaf Jan 6 '17 at 11:15
  • 1
    If you want to count the number of characters without the spaces, you have to sum up the lengths of all entries in the wordslist, because since line still contains the spaces, len(line) returns 15 for the first line, not 12. – LWChris Jan 6 '17 at 13:46
  • 1
    None of this will work correctly for unicode in python 2. See my answer. – Jared Smith Jan 6 '17 at 14:50
  • Possible duplicate of counting characters and lines from a file python 2.7 – ziMtyth Aug 31 '17 at 8:17

16 Answers 16

21

Sum up the length of all words in a line:

characters += sum(len(word) for word in wordslist)

The whole program:

with open('my_words.txt') as infile:
    lines=0
    words=0
    characters=0
    for line in infile:
        wordslist=line.split()
        lines=lines+1
        words=words+len(wordslist)
        characters += sum(len(word) for word in wordslist)
print(lines)
print(words)
print(characters)

Output:

3
13
35

This:

(len(word) for word in wordslist)

is a generator expression. It is essentially a loop in one line that produces the length of each word. We feed these lengths directly to sum:

sum(len(word) for word in wordslist)

Improved version

This version takes advantage of enumerate, so you save two lines of code, while keeping the readability:

with open('my_words.txt') as infile:
    words = 0
    characters = 0
    for lineno, line in enumerate(infile, 1):
        wordslist = line.split()
        words += len(wordslist)
        characters += sum(len(word) for word in wordslist)

print(lineno)
print(words)
print(characters)

This line:

with open('my_words.txt') as infile:

opens the file with the promise to close it as soon as you leave indentation. It is always good practice to close file after your are done using it.

9

Remember that each line (except for the last) has a line separator. I.e. "\r\n" for Windows or "\n" for Linux and Mac.

Thus, exactly two characters are added in this case, as 47 and not 45.

A nice way to overcome this could be to use:

import os

fname=input("enter the name of the file:")
infile=open(fname, 'r')
lines=0
words=0
characters=0
for line in infile:
    line = line.strip(os.linesep)
    wordslist=line.split()
    lines=lines+1
    words=words+len(wordslist)
    characters=characters+ len(line)
print(lines)
print(words)
print(characters)
  • yeah i was thinking of this but not sure but thanks got it – S.Soopra Jan 6 '17 at 11:21
8

To count the characters, you should count each individual word. So you could have another loop that counts characters:

for word in wordslist:
    characters += len(word)

That ought to do it. The wordslist should probably take away newline characters on the right, something like wordslist = line.rstrip().split() perhaps.

8

I found this solution very simply and readable:

with open("filename", 'r') as file:
    text = file.read().strip().split()
    len_chars = sum(len(word) for word in text)
    print(len_chars)
  • I prefer this, using the "with open" context manager. And more concise, clear python. – PurpleDiane Mar 19 '17 at 20:39
8

This is too long for a comment.

Python 2 or 3? Because it really matters. Try out the following in your REPL for both:

Python 2.7.12
>>>len("taña")
5

Python 3.5.2
>>>len("taña")
4

Huh? The answer lies in unicode. That ñ is an 'n' with a combining diacritical. Meaning its 1 character, but not 1 byte. So unless you're working with plain ASCII text, you'd better specify which version of python your character counting function is for.

  • OK, good catch, so then how do you get the correct number of characters for a string such as "taña" in Python 2.7.x? – GJoe Jan 7 '17 at 0:12
  • 1
    @GJoe probably something like this: len(("taña").decode('utf8')) although I strongly suspect this depends on the default encoding (sys.getdefaultencoding()) and probably your text editor or console encoding. – Peter Hansen Jan 7 '17 at 19:21
  • @GJoe Peter Hansen's snippet should work in most cases. Or just use python 3 :) – Jared Smith Jan 8 '17 at 12:45
6

How's this? It uses a regular expression to match all non-whitespace characters and returns the number of matches within a string.

import re

DATA="""
hey how are you
I am fine and you
Yes I am fine
"""

def get_char_count(s):
    return len(re.findall(r'\S', s))

if __name__ == '__main__':
    print(get_char_count(DATA))

Output

35

The image below shows this tested on RegExr:

Regex Test

5

It is probably counting new line characters. Subtract characters with (lines+1)

5

Here is the code:

fp = open(fname, 'r+').read()
chars = fp.decode('utf8')
print len(chars)

Check the output. I just tested it.

5

A more Pythonic solution than the others:

with open('foo.txt') as f:
  text = f.read().splitlines() # list of lines

lines = len(text) # length of the list = number of lines
words = sum(len(line.split()) for line in text) # split each line on spaces, sum up the lengths of the lists of words
characters = sum(len(line) for line in text) # sum up the length of each line

print(lines)
print(words)
print(characters)

The other answers here are manually doing what str.splitlines() does. There's no reason to reinvent the wheel.

4

You do have the correct answer - and your code is completely correct. The thing that I think it is doing is that there is an end of line character being passed through, which includes your character count by two (there isn't one on the last line, as there is no new line to go to). If you want to remove this, the simple fudge would be to do as Loaf suggested

characters = characters - (lines - 1)

See csl's answer for the second part...

4

Simply skip unwanted characters while calling len,

import os
characters=characters+ len([c for c in line if c not in (os.linesep, ' ')])

or sum the count,

characters=characters+ sum(1 for c in line if c not in (os.linesep, ' '))

or build a str from the wordlist and take len,

characters=characters+ len(''.join(wordlist))

or sum the characters in the wordlist. I think this is the fastest.

characters=characters+ sum(1 for word in wordlist for char in word)
4

You have two problems. One is the line endings and the other is the spaces in between.

Now there are many people who posted pretty good answers, but I find this method easier to understand:

characters = characters + len(line.strip()) - line.strip().count(' ')

line.strip() removes the trailing and leading spaces. Then I'm subtracting the number of spaces from the total length.

0

It's very simple:

f = open('file.txt', 'rb')
f.seek(0) # Move to the start of file
print len(f.read()) 
0

Here i got smallest program with less memory usage for your problem

with open('FileName.txt') as f:
  lines = f.readlines()
  data = ''.join(lines)
  print('lines =',len(lines))
  print('Words = ',len(data.split()))
  data = ''.join(data.split())
  print('characters = ',len(data))

lines will be list of lines,so length of lines is nothing but number of lines.Next step data contains a string of your file contents(each word separated by a whitespace), so if we split data gives list of words in your file. thus, length of that list gives number of words. again if we join the words list you will get all characters as a single string. thus length of that gives number of characters.

0

taking the input as file name i.e files.txt from the input parameter and then counting the total number of characters in the file and save to the variable char

fname = input("Enter the name of the file:")
infile = open(fname, 'r')                   # connection of the file
lines = 0
words = 0
char = 0                                    # init as zero integer
for line in infile:
    wordslist = line.split()                # splitting line to word
    lines = lines + 1                       # counter up the word
    words = words + len(wordslist)          # splitting word to charac
    char = char + len(line)                 # counter up the character

print("lines are: " + str(lines))
print("words are: " + str(words))
print("chars are: " + str(char))            # printing beautify
  • When answering questions on stackoverflow, provide explanation to your code, and explain how you managed to solve the problem. – Basel Issmail Mar 5 '19 at 17:32
  • The Code I have Given is Useful for Counting LINES, WORDS and CHARACTERS – Eshan Chattaraj Apr 18 '19 at 6:45
0
num_lines = sum(1 for line in open('filename.txt'))
num_words = sum(1 for word in open('filename.txt').read().split())
num_chars = sum(len(word) for word in open('filename.txt').read().split())

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