1

I would like to run a series of commands (which take a long time). But I do not want to wait for the completion of each command. How can I go about this in Python?

I looked at

os.fork()

and

subprocess.popen()

Don't think that is what I need.

Code

def command1():
   wait(10)

def command2():
   wait(10)

def command3():
   wait(10)

I would like to call

command1()
command2()
command3()

Without having to wait.

  • You could use asyncio subprocess, if you're using Python 3.4+ – PM 2Ring Jan 6 '17 at 11:44
  • If your commands are python functions, you can consider threads: docs.python.org/2/library/threading.html . It also depends of what you mean by "I do not want to wait" – doomyster Jan 6 '17 at 11:51
  • 1
    Well ... just remove the "wait" ... sorry. :) Have you looked into multiprocessing? You could start a process for every command. The default documentation explains this pretty well. – z0rberg's Jan 6 '17 at 11:58
  • @z0rberg's hahahahah! But that would include executing an "external" python script right ? – Prakash Raman Jan 6 '17 at 12:00
  • @doomyster thanks - taking a look. I mean, I just want to start execution of the method and carry on. – Prakash Raman Jan 6 '17 at 12:01
2

Use python's multiprocessing module.

def func(arg1):
    ... do something ...

from multiprocessing import Process
p = Process(target=func, args=(arg1,), name='func')
p.start()

Complete Documentaion is over here: https://docs.python.org/2/library/multiprocessing.html

EDIT:

You can also use the Threading module of python if you are using jpython/cpython distribution as you can overcome the GIL (Global Interpreter Lock) in these distributions.

https://docs.python.org/2/library/threading.html

| improve this answer | |
  • You should fix/clarify your sentence about the GIL. – moooeeeep Jan 6 '17 at 13:14
2

The most straightforward way is to use Python's own multiprocessing:

from multiprocessing import Process

def command1():
   wait(10)
...

call1 = Process(target=command1, args=(...))
call1.start()
...

This module was introduced back exactly to ease the burden on controlling external process execution of functions accessible in the same code-base Of course, that could already be done by using os.fork, subprocess. Multiprocessing emulates as far as possible, Python's own threading moudle interface. The one immediate advantage of using multiprocessing over threading is that this enables the various worker processes to make use of different CPU cores, actually working in parallel - while threading, effectively, due to language design limitations is actually limited to a single execution worker at once, thus making use of a single core even when several are available.

Now, note that there are still peculiarities - specially if you are, for example, calling these from inside a web-request. Check this question an answers form a few days ago: Stop a background process in flask without creating zombie processes

| improve this answer | |
2

This example maybe is suitable for you:

#!/usr/bin/env python3

import sys
import os
import time

def forked(fork_func):
    def do_fork():
        pid = os.fork()
        if (pid > 0): 
            fork_func()
            exit(0)
        else:
            return pid
    return do_fork

@forked
def command1():
    time.sleep(2)

@forked
def command2():
    time.sleep(1)

command1()
command2()
print("Hello")

You just use decorator @forked for your functions.

There is only one problem: when main program is over, it waits for end of child processes.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    That is a nice example but it is really just starting to re-invent the wheel on what Python's multiprocessing does - and if you open the documentation for it, you will find out there are a Lot of things to make it work properly. Starting from the fact that os.fork do not work on Windows platform. – jsbueno Jan 6 '17 at 15:13
  • But yes, you've got a very nice and simple example there. Thanks anyway. – jsbueno Jan 6 '17 at 15:14
  • I know about multiprocessing module. Only one it gives is cross-platform. Author asked exactly about launching functions with minimal syntax in call time. This way gives it. There is possibility to write code with multiprocessing features inside do_fork(), and it's better, i agree. But my idea is using decorators for light syntax, it isn't os.fork() or multiprocess.Process(). – ValeriyKr Jan 6 '17 at 15:21

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