22

I'm recording mic input using the XNA library (I don't think this is really technology specific, but it never hurts). Every time I get a sample I would like to calculate the decibels. I have done many searches on the internet and not found a rock solid example...

Here is my attempt at calculating decibels from a sample:

        double peak = 0;

        for (var i = 0; i < _buffer.Length; i = i + 2)
        {
            var sample = BitConverter.ToInt16(_buffer, i);
            if (sample > peak)
                peak = sample;
            else if (sample < -peak)
                peak = -sample;
        }

        var decibel = (20 * Math.Log10(peak/32768));

If I output the decibel value to the screen I can see the values get higher as I get louder and lower as I speak softer. However, it always hovers around -40 when I'm absolutely quiet...I would assume it would be -90. I must have a calculation wrong in the block above?? from what I have read on some sites -40 is equivalent to "soft talking"...however, it's totally quiet.

Also, If I mute my mic it goes straight to -90.

Am I doing it wrong?

  • there's probably background noises? – mauris Nov 11 '10 at 7:42
  • 1
    USEFUL for researchers who find this page: float rms2db(float value) { return 10 * log10(value); } – com.prehensible Feb 28 '16 at 13:29
32

When measuring the level of a sound signal, you should calculate the dB from the RMS value. In your sample you are looking at the absolute peak level. A single (peak) sample value determines your dB value, even when all other samples are exactly 0.

try this:

double sum = 0;
for (var i = 0; i < _buffer.length; i = i + 2)
{
    double sample = BitConverter.ToInt16(_buffer, i) / 32768.0;
    sum += (sample * sample);
}
double rms = Math.Sqrt(sum / (_buffer.length / 2));
var decibel = 20 * Math.Log10(rms);

For 'instantaneous' dB levels you would normally calculate the RMS over a segment of 20-50 ms. Note that the calculated dB value is relative to full-scale. For sound the dB value should be related to 20 uPa, and you will need to calibrate your signal to find the proper conversion from digital values to pressure values.

  • And by calibrate you mean that the each client would have to find their zero...because each device and environment will be different? For instance mine, seems to be -40 while everything is silent....would I calibrate that to zero? – Ryan Eastabrook Nov 11 '10 at 15:58
  • Normally you would use a microphone calibrator for that. The calibrator delivers a signal with a very precise known level, say 98 dB. You then measure/record this signal and derive a scale factor (to be multiplied with each sample value) such that the decibel value you calculate is 98 dB. – Han Nov 11 '10 at 17:55
  • 3
    The 98dB of the calibrator is relative to 20uPa, so the actual rms pressure level would be 20*10E-6 * 10^(98/20) = 1.59 Pascal. Sometimes you can find the microphone sensitivity in mV/Pa. Then you would only need to know the relation between the voltage on the ADC input and the digital value the ADC delivers. This would allow you to us a known voltage source (or a voltmeter) to calibrate the circuit behind the microphone, and use the microphone sensitivity to get the calibration scale factor. – Han Nov 11 '10 at 18:09
  • Although I don't fully understand all of the algorithms you're describing, I'm convinced you know much more about this than me. ;) – Ryan Eastabrook Nov 12 '10 at 1:07
  • 1
    Shouldn't it be: Math.Sqrt(sum / (_buffer.length/2)); – Grimmace Oct 1 '12 at 19:54
5

I appreciate Han's post, and wrote a routine that can calculate decibels on 8 and 16 bit audio formats, with multiple channels using his example.

public double MeasureDecibels(byte[] samples, int length, int bitsPerSample,
        int numChannels, params int[] channelsToMeasure)
    {
        if (samples == null || length == 0 || samples.Length == 0)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Missing samples to measure.");
        }
        //check bits are 8 or 16.
        if (bitsPerSample != 8 && bitsPerSample != 16)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Only 8 and 16 bit samples allowed.");
        }
        //check channels are valid
        if (channelsToMeasure == null || channelsToMeasure.Length == 0)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Must have target channels.");
        }
        //check each channel is in proper range.
        foreach (int channel in channelsToMeasure)
        {
            if (channel < 0 || channel >= numChannels)
            {
                throw new ArgumentException("Invalid channel requested.");
            }
        }

        //ensure we have only full blocks. A half a block isn't considered valid.
        int sampleSizeInBytes = bitsPerSample / 8;
        int blockSizeInBytes = sampleSizeInBytes * numChannels;
        if (length % blockSizeInBytes != 0)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Non-integral number of bytes passed for given audio format.");
        }

        double sum = 0;
        for (var i = 0; i < length; i = i + blockSizeInBytes)
        {
            double sumOfChannels = 0;
            for (int j = 0; j < channelsToMeasure.Length; j++)
            {
                int channelOffset = channelsToMeasure[j] * sampleSizeInBytes;
                int channelIndex = i + channelOffset;
                if (bitsPerSample == 8)
                {
                    sumOfChannels = (127 - samples[channelIndex]) / byte.MaxValue;
                }
                else
                {
                    double sampleValue = BitConverter.ToInt16(samples, channelIndex);
                    sumOfChannels += (sampleValue / short.MaxValue);
                }
            }
            double averageOfChannels = sumOfChannels / channelsToMeasure.Length;
            sum += (averageOfChannels * averageOfChannels);
        }
        int numberSamples = length / blockSizeInBytes;
        double rootMeanSquared = Math.Sqrt(sum / numberSamples);
        if (rootMeanSquared == 0)
        {
            return 0;
        }
        else
        {
            double logvalue = Math.Log10(rootMeanSquared);
            double decibel = 20 * logvalue;
            return decibel;
        }
    }
3

I think Yann means that Decibels are a relative scale. If you're trying to measure the actual Sound Pressure Level or SPL, you would need to calibrate. What you're measuring is dBFS (decibels full-scale, I think). You're measuring how many decibels quieter the signal is than the loudest possible signal the system can represent (the "full-scale" signal, or 32768 for these 16-bit samples). That's why all the values are negative.

  • Correct, fixing mine up :) – Yann Ramin Nov 11 '10 at 8:15

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