10

I feel a little silly asking this, but I've sort of exhausted my knowledge of Flexboxes, so I'm hoping maybe someone else can come in and help me out here.

My overall goal is to just have the two items in the middle row stretch to fill the space between the header and the items, and I have searched around and honestly can't figure out what it is that I should do. I forked the code from the CSS Tricks Guide, the one at the very bottom, and I've made some alterations. The code I currently have is (open it in full screen mode to make it more clear):

body,
html {
  height: 100%;
}
.wrapper {
  display: -webkit-box;
  display: -moz-box;
  display: -ms-flexbox;
  display: -webkit-flex;
  display: flex;
  justify-content: flex-start;
  -webkit-flex-flow: row wrap;
  flex-flow: row wrap;
  height: 100%;
  font-weight: bold;
  text-align: center;
}
.wrapper > * {
  padding: 10px;
  flex: 1 1 100%;
}
.header {
  background: tomato;
  height: 50px;
  flex: 1 1 100%;
}
.footer {
  background: lightgreen;
  height: 50px;
}
.main {
  text-align: left;
  align-self: stretch;
  background: deepskyblue;
}
.aside-1 {
  background: gold;
}
.aside-2 {
  background: hotpink;
}
@media all and (min-width: 600px) {
  .aside {
    flex: 1 auto;
  }
}
@media all and (min-width: 800px) {
  .main {
    flex: 3 0px;
  }
  .aside-1 {
    order: 1;
  }
  .main {
    order: 2;
  }
  .aside-2 {
    order: 3;
  }
  .footer {
    order: 4;
  }
}
body {
  padding: 2em;
}
<div class="wrapper">
  <header class="header">Header</header>
  <article class="main">
    <p>Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Vestibulum tortor quam, feugiat vitae, ultricies eget, tempor sit amet, ante. Donec eu libero sit amet quam egestas semper. Aenean ultricies mi vitae est.
      Mauris placerat eleifend leo.</p>
  </article>
  <aside class="aside aside-1">Aside 1</aside>

  <footer class="footer">Footer</footer>
</div>

Is it possible in flexbox to achieve this without changing the HTML, or should I just look for another way to accomplish this goal?

20
  • 2
    @Ced It's a very close duplicate, despite trivial differentiations which can easily be implemented with a little thought. – Mystical Jan 8 '17 at 2:16
  • 1
    @Jhecht Thanks for the question, I found it great and that why I got a lil mad in the comment section when someone said it was a dupe. Plz check my answer, I spent a good while doing it. – Ced Jan 8 '17 at 5:34
  • 1
    As far as I know, no, it's not possible to get this result without changes in the markup – vals Jan 8 '17 at 8:47
  • 1
    @vals Since header and footer has fixed height it is doable :) .... doable != recommended – Ason Jan 8 '17 at 9:08
  • 1
    @LGSon I mean, letting the flex do the layout... Of course you can always calculate the height by yourself (as in kukkuz answer, or your own) – vals Jan 8 '17 at 9:14
10

While people are telling you how to resolve the issue, they are not telling you why you don't have the result you expected. I think it's partly because most of them missed the actual question. Which I found really interesting.

Let me get some things out of the way first :

Flex-direction:: For practical purpose it means the direction in which the items are displayed. However it's not accurate.

For now let's say that if the direction is set to row, it means that each item must have the height of the container and they should be put next to each other. In other words the container has to be considered a row and the item are the columns.

.c{
  display: flex;
  width: 400px;
  height:100px;
}
.c1{
  flex-grow: 1;
  background:gold;

}
.c2{
  flex-grow: 1;
  background:red;
}
<div class="c">
    <div class="c1"></div>
    <div class="c2"></div>
</div>

I didn't specify an height, the items filled the height of the row and stacked against each others like columns.


When you specify an height the item will take the height you defined but that does not change the height of the row :

.c{
  display: flex;
  width: 400px;
  height: 100px;
}
.c1{
  flex-grow: 1;
  height: 40px;
  background:gold;

}
.c2{
  flex-grow: 1;
  background:red;
}
<div class="c">
    <div class="c1"></div>
    <div class="c2"></div>
</div>

The red cube still spawn the vertical space because the height of the row hasn't changed.


flex grow: the amount of free space distributed to the different items.

.c{
    display: flex;
    width: 400px;
  }

.c1{
  flex-grow: 1;
  background:gold;
  }

.c2{
  flex-grow: 1;
  background:red;
  }
    <div class="c">
        <div class="c1">AAAAAAAAAAAAA</div>
        <div class="c2"></div>
    </div>

Despite having the same flex-grow value, those two items aren't the same size, that is because the free space is distributed among them but the yellow rectangle was bigger to begin with.


First let's use flex-wrap : wrap:

.c{
  display: flex;
  flex-wrap: wrap;
  border: 1px solid black;
  width: 400px;
  height:100px;
}
.c1{
  width:200px;
  background:gold;

}
.c2{
  width:200px;
  background:red;
}

.c3{
  width:100px;
  background:orange;

}
.c4{
  width:300px;
  background:green;
}
<div class="c">
    <div class="c1"></div>
    <div class="c2"></div>
    <div class="c3"></div>
    <div class="c4"></div>
</div>

As we can see when we go beyond the amount of width available the items start under, effectively creating another row.


Now to address your question:

What if we took the example above and set the height of the first item ? Let's see:

    .c{
      display: flex;
      flex-wrap: wrap;
      border: 1px solid black;
      width: 400px;
      height:100px;
    }
    .c1{
      width:200px;
      height: 30px;
      background:gold;

    }
    .c2{
      width:200px;
      background:red;
    }

    .c3{
      width:200px;
      background:orange;

    }
    .c4{
      width:200px;
      background:green;
    }
<div class="c">
  <div class="c1"></div>
  <div class="c2"></div>
  <div class="c3"></div>
  <div class="c4"></div>
</div>

Like in your snippet.

Let's see another example:

        .c{
          display: flex;
          flex-wrap: wrap;
          border: 1px solid black;
          width: 600px;
          height:100px;
        }
        .c1{
          width:400px;
          height: 35px;
          background:gold;

        }
        .c2{
          width:200px;
          background:red;
        }

        .c3{
          width:200px;
          background:orange;

        }
        .c4{
          width:200px;
          background:green;
        }
        .c5{
          width:200px;
          background:purple;
        }
    <div class="c">
      <div class="c1"></div>
      <div class="c2"></div>
      <div class="c3"></div>
      <div class="c4"></div>
      <div class="c5"></div>
    </div>

  1. yellow cube of 400px X 35px is put and spans 2 columns, then red cube of 200px is put and spans 1 column.

  2. At this point all the rectangles have 0 height except the first one which has 35px.

  3. The remaining vertical space is divided between the rows as to spawn the whole vertical space. Thus the remaining vertical space is 100-35 = 65px. divided in 2 rows = 32.5. The first row gets 35 + 32.5 and the second row gets 32.5px height.

Another example to make things clearer:

    .c, .d{
              display: flex;
              flex-wrap: wrap;
              border: 1px solid black;
              width: 600px;
              height:100px;
            }

            .c1{
              flex-shrink: 0;
              width:400px;
              height: 0px;
              background:gold;

            }
            .c2{
              width:200px;
              background:red;
            }

            .c3{
              width:200px;
              background:orange;

            }
            .c4{
              width:200px;
              background:green;
            }
            .c5{
              width:200px;
              background:purple;
            }


            .d1{
              width:400px;
              height: 50px;
              background:gold;

            }
            .d2{
              width:200px;
              background:red;
            }

            .d3{
              width:200px;
              background:orange;

            }
            .d4{
              width:200px;
              background:green;
            }
            .d5{
              width:200px;
              background:purple;
            }
First item has 0px height, the vertical space remaining (100px) is divided between the 2 rows. Both row have 50px height
        <div class="c">
          <div class="c1"></div>
          <div class="c2"></div>
          <div class="c3"></div>
          <div class="c4"></div>
          <div class="c5"></div>
        </div>

First item has 35px height, the vertical space remaining (65px) is divided between the 2 rows.
        <div class="d">
          <div class="d1"></div>
          <div class="d2"></div>
          <div class="d3"></div>
          <div class="d4"></div>
          <div class="d5"></div>
        </div>

To resolve this you can use calc() to calculate the other rows height like others suggested. The reason is that there is no more free vertical space to be shared.

            .c{
              display: flex;
              flex-wrap: wrap;
              border: 1px solid black;
              width: 600px;
              height:100px;
            }
            .c1{
              width:400px;
              height: 35px;
              background:gold;

            }
            .c2{
              width:200px;
              background:red;
            }

            .c3{
              height:calc(100% - 35px);
              width:600px;
              background:green;

            }
            
            
        <div class="c">
          <div class="c1"></div>
          <div class="c2"></div>
          <div class="c3"></div>
        </div>

2
  • that is one hell of an answer right there. – Jhecht Jan 8 '17 at 5:39
  • 1
    @Jhecht ahah I spent more time than I should on this but this really intriged me ! lol – Ced Jan 8 '17 at 5:41
7

The idea is to wrap them around a container and use flex-grow:1; on that container, this will make the container fill the space between the header and footer..

Then in the @media query, change the flex-direction of this container to row. This will make the .main and aside to come side by side on big screens.

body,
html {
  height: 100%;
}
.wrapper {
  display: -webkit-box;
  display: -moz-box;
  display: -ms-flexbox;
  display: -webkit-flex;
  display: flex;
  justify-content: flex-start;
  flex-direction:column;
  height: 100%;
  font-weight: bold;
  text-align: center;
}
.wrapper > * {
  padding: 10px;
}
.header {
  background: tomato;
  height: 50px;
  flex-shrink:0;
}
.footer {
  background: lightgreen;
  height: 50px;
  flex-shrink:0;
}
.main {
  text-align: left;
  //align-self: stretch;
  background: deepskyblue;
  padding:10px;
}
.main p{
  margin:0;
  padding:0;
}
.aside-1 {
  background: gold;
}
.aside-2 {
  background: hotpink;
}
.container{
  width:100%;
  margin:0;
  padding:0;
  flex-grow:1;
  flex-shrink:0;
}
@media all and (min-width: 600px) {
  .aside {
    flex: 1 auto;
  }
}
@media all and (min-width: 800px) {
  .container{
    display:flex;
    flex-direction:row;
  }
  .main {
    flex: 3 0px;
    flex-grow:1;
    flex-shrink:0;
  }
  .aside-1 {
    order: 1;
    flex-grow:1;
    flex-shrink:0;
  }
  .main {
    order: 2;
  }
  .aside-2 {
    order: 3;
  }
  .footer {
    order: 4;
  }
}
body {
  padding: 2em;
}
<div class="wrapper">
  <header class="header">Header</header>
  <div class="container">
  <article class="main">
    <p>Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Vestibulum tortor quam, feugiat vitae, ultricies eget, tempor sit amet, ante. Donec eu libero sit amet quam egestas semper. Aenean ultricies mi vitae est.
      Mauris placerat eleifend leo.</p>
  </article>
  <aside class="aside aside-1">Aside 1</aside>
    </div>
  <footer class="footer">Footer</footer>
</div>

9
  • Is there a way to do this without using the wrapping element? – Jhecht Jan 8 '17 at 3:46
  • 1
    I don't think there is because there are to boxes which have to grow. Let me try, give me 10. If I can swing that I'll let you know. – ab29007 Jan 8 '17 at 4:01
  • much obliged @kittyCat – Jhecht Jan 8 '17 at 4:01
  • If you can figure something out I'd be thankful, but if not know that I do appreciate your help. I marked kukkuz as correct simply because he did manage to get a working example without changing the HTML, but as explained in the comment I dislike using calc() unless absolutely necessary (though the project may end up needing to use it). – Jhecht Jan 8 '17 at 4:25
  • @Jhecht Come on man, the answer you accepted was the exactly same as mine. He used a wrapping element too. Also his answer doesn't work in chrome anyway. – ab29007 Jan 8 '17 at 4:25
3

You can't fill the remaining space in the cross-axis direction when you are using a wrapping flexbox - I guess you need a column flexbox for that.

But you can do this as a quick fix:

  1. Add align-content: center to the flexbox (for resetting the default stretch value)

  2. Adjust the heights using calc (have removed the body padding and margin for illustration)

See demo below:

body,
html {
  height: 100%;
}
.wrapper {
  display: -webkit-box;
  display: -moz-box;
  display: -ms-flexbox;
  display: -webkit-flex;
  display: flex;
  justify-content: flex-start;
  -webkit-flex-flow: row wrap;
  flex-flow: row wrap;
  height: 100%;
  font-weight: bold;
  text-align: center;
  align-content: center; /* ADDED THIS */
}
.wrapper > * {
  padding: 10px;
  flex: 1 1 100%;
}
.header {
  background: tomato;
  height: 50px;
  flex: 1 1 100%;
}
.footer {
  background: lightgreen;
  height: 50px;
}
.main {
  text-align: left;
  align-self: stretch;
  background: deepskyblue;
  height: calc(50vh - 90px); /* ADDED THIS */
}
.aside-1 {
  background: gold;
  height: calc(50vh - 90px); /* ADDED THIS */
}
.aside-2 {
  background: hotpink;
}
@media all and (min-width: 600px) {
  .aside {
    flex: 1 auto;
  }
}
@media all and (min-width: 800px) {
  .main {
    flex: 3 0px;
  }
  .aside-1 {
    order: 1;
    height: calc(100vh - 160px); /* ADDED THIS */
  }
  .main {
    order: 2;
    height: calc(100vh - 160px); /* ADDED THIS */
  }
  .aside-2 {
    order: 3;
  }
  .footer {
    order: 4;
  }
}
body {
  /* padding: 2em;*/
  margin: 0; /* ADDED THIS */
}
<div class="wrapper">
  <header class="header">Header</header>
  <article class="main">
    <p>Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Vestibulum tortor quam, feugiat vitae, ultricies eget, tempor sit amet, ante. Donec eu libero sit amet quam egestas semper. Aenean ultricies mi vitae est.
      Mauris placerat eleifend leo.</p>
  </article>
  <aside class="aside aside-1">Aside 1</aside>

  <footer class="footer">Footer</footer>
</div>

Using calc is not very tidy and you would want to use a nested flexbox here (if it is ok to change the html):

  1. Add a wrapper for the main and aside-1 and make it a wrapping flexbox in row direction

  2. Add flex: 1 to this wrapper to fill the vertical space between the header and footer

See demo below:

body,
html {
  height: 100%;
}
.wrapper {
  display: -webkit-box;
  display: -moz-box;
  display: -ms-flexbox;
  display: -webkit-flex;
  display: flex;
  /*-webkit-flex-flow: row wrap;*/
  /*flex-flow: row wrap;*/
  flex-direction: column;
  height: 100%;
  font-weight: bold;
  text-align: center;
}
.wrapper > * {
  padding: 10px;
  /*flex: 1 1 100%;*/
}
.header {
  background: tomato;
  height: 50px;
  /*flex: 1 1 100%;*/
}
.footer {
  background: lightgreen;
  height: 50px;
}
.main {
  text-align: left;
  align-self: stretch;
  background: deepskyblue;
}
.aside-1 {
  background: gold;
  flex: 1 auto;/* ADDED THIS */
}
.aside-2 {
  background: hotpink;
}
.wrapper > section { /* ADDED THIS */
  display: flex; 
  flex-flow:row wrap;
  flex: 1;
  padding: 0;
  overflow: auto;
}
@media all and (min-width: 600px) {
  .aside {
    flex: 1 auto;
  }
}
@media all and (min-width: 800px) {
  .main {
    flex: 3 0px;
  }
  .aside-1 {
    order: 1;
  }
  .main {
    order: 2;
  }
  .aside-2 {
    order: 3;
  }
  .footer {
    order: 4;
  }
}
body {
  /*padding: 2em;*/
  margin: 0;
}
<div class="wrapper">
  <header class="header">Header</header>
  <section>
    <article class="main">
      <p>Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Vestibulum tortor quam, feugiat vitae, ultricies eget, tempor sit amet, ante. Donec eu libero sit amet quam egestas semper. Aenean ultricies mi vitae est.
        Mauris placerat eleifend leo.</p>
    </article>
    <aside class="aside aside-1">Aside 1</aside>
  </section>
  <footer class="footer">Footer</footer>
</div>

8
  • 1
    So far this is definitely seeming the best answer. I'm fiddling with the actual HTML / CSS I plan on using to see if this works. – Jhecht Jan 8 '17 at 4:07
  • 1
    To comment on why I marked this answer as accepted: It the second code snippet in particular ends up working best for the actual HTML -- I'm still fiddling with it (as I have to rewrite some of the other CSS in the project) but it works the best. I'd have liked to leave the HTML alone (like the first snippet) but I too like to avoid using calc() unless necessary. Thanks very much kukkuz! – Jhecht Jan 8 '17 at 4:17
  • 2
    In the second demo–using chrome–the .aside-1 element is behind the footer. Though adding overflow: auto to ,wrapper > * shows that it can overflow correctly. .main, .aside-1, .aside-2 { overflow: auto; } would produce the same results for both examples. – user4639281 Jan 8 '17 at 4:17
  • 1
    I hadn't noticed that due to the length of the content I was using to fill space (wasn't long enough to notice it was going behind the footer) – Jhecht Jan 8 '17 at 4:36
  • 1
    @kukkuz I also added overflow:auto to the .main element to ensure the background colors follow the text (otherwise they stopped at the first render boundaries) – Jhecht Jan 8 '17 at 4:49
3

After reading all the other answers, I decided to post my own.

I might have missed something already posted or misunderstood the question, though for me this should be the simplest solution, without any markup changed.

If this answers your question, I will add a short explanation why/how it works.

html, body {
  margin: 0;
}
.wrapper {
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: column;
  height: 100vh;
}
.header {
  height: 50px;
}
.footer {
  height: 50px;
}
.main {
  text-align: left;
  flex: 1;
}

@media (min-width: 600px) {
  .aside {
    flex: 1;
  }
}
@media (min-width: 800px) {
  .wrapper {
    flex-direction: row;
    flex-wrap: wrap;
  }
  .header {
    flex-basis: 100%;
    order: -1;
  }
  .main {
    flex: 2;
  }
  .aside-1 {
    order: -1;
    height: calc(100% - 100px);
  }
  .footer {
    flex-basis: 100%;
  }
}



/*  for styling  */
.wrapper {
  font-weight: bold;
  text-align: center;
}
.wrapper > * {
  padding: 10px;
  box-sizing: border-box;
}
.header {
  background: tomato;
}
.footer {
  background: lightgreen;
}
.main {
  background: deepskyblue;
}
.aside-1 {
  background: gold;
}
<div class="wrapper">
  <header class="header">Header</header>
  <article class="main">
    <p>Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Vestibulum tortor quam, feugiat vitae, ultricies eget, tempor sit amet, ante. Donec eu libero sit amet quam egestas semper. Aenean ultricies mi vitae est.
      Mauris placerat eleifend leo.</p>
  </article>
  <aside class="aside aside-1">Aside 1</aside>

  <footer class="footer">Footer</footer>
</div>

If you were able to change the markup, here is a version of mine, with a much simpler code base than others have given, and also the header and footer is without a fixed height.

html, body {
  margin: 0;
}
.wrapper {
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: column;
  min-height: 100vh;
}
.innerwrapper {
  flex: 1;
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: column;
}
.main {
  flex: 1;
  text-align: left;
}

@media (min-width: 600px) {
  .aside {
    flex: 1;
  }
}
@media (min-width: 800px) {
  .innerwrapper {
    flex-direction: row;
  }
  .aside-1 {
    order: -1;
  }
}



/*  for styling  */
.wrapper {
  font-weight: bold;
  text-align: center;
}
.wrapper > *:not(.innerwrapper),
.wrapper .innerwrapper > * {
  padding: 10px;
  box-sizing: border-box;
}
.header {
  background: tomato;
}
.footer {
  background: lightgreen;
}
.main {
  background: deepskyblue;
}
.aside-1 {
  background: gold;
}
<div class="wrapper">
  <header class="header">Header</header>
  
  <div class="innerwrapper">
    <article class="main">
      <p>Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Vestibulum tortor quam, feugiat vitae, ultricies eget, tempor sit amet, ante. Donec eu libero sit amet quam egestas semper. Aenean ultricies mi vitae est.
      Mauris placerat eleifend leo.</p>
    </article>
  
    <aside class="aside aside-1">Aside 1</aside>
  </div>

  <footer class="footer">Footer</footer>
</div>

4
  • It uses something very similar to kukkuz's answer from my understanding -- using the calc() css3 function. – Jhecht Jan 8 '17 at 8:10
  • @Jhecht Yes, it does, though properly combined with a flexbox column layout. May I ask why to not change markup? – Ason Jan 8 '17 at 8:24
  • Vanity mostly, Curiosity after that, and a mild attempt to not have to rewrite any jQuery. – Jhecht Jan 8 '17 at 8:39
  • 1
    @Jhecht Vanity is good, keep you on your toes :) ... but to stand on your toes to long might hurt. Added a 2:nd sample, which I recommend you chose, whether you pick my answer or not. – Ason Jan 8 '17 at 8:45

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