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git rebase is awesome, only problem is I want something slightly different. Let's say I have branchA and master. And say I have 3 commits made to branchA that is not within master.

master: 0 -> 1 -> 2

branchA: 0 -> 1 -> 2 -> 3 -> 4 -> 5

And then let's say I make a commit to master: 0 -> 1 -> 2 -> 6

Now when I rebase, branchA becomes: 0 -> 1 -> 2 -> 6 -> 4 -> 5

However, I want to do something slightly different involving a third branch. Let's call that branchB

branchB: 0 -> 1

And pretend I didn't rebase branchA, so it still looks like: 0 -> 1 -> 2 -> 3 -> 4 -> 5

I'm basically searching for a command or set of commands that will allow me to take master/branchA into account to determine that 0 -> 1 -> 2 are common commits and then based on that rebase onto branchB.

branchB should look like this once complete: 0 -> 1 -> 3 -> 4 -> 5

Because even though commit 2 was in both master and branchA, commit 1 is the closest parent that exist in branchB.

Is such a thing possible in git?

  • This doesn't look like a typical use case. Why do you want to do this? You could always do an interactive rebase. – Tim Biegeleisen Jan 8 '17 at 3:34
  • We have clients on multiple major versions we support. So say there's a version 7 and 8. But then we also have these clients on their own sites with local branches merged into it. What I want to do is create a site_branch that keeps track of site-specific changes, instead of just in the working copy. But what I would like is for our official code to be first whenever they upgrade or downgrade. – Robert Jan 8 '17 at 4:13
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I'm basically searching for a command or set of commands that will allow me to take master/branchA into account to determine that 0 -> 1 -> 2 are common commits and then based on that rebase onto branchB.

See git merge-base:

git rebase --onto B $(git merge-base master A) A

A git merge-base master A would return 2.
A git rebase --onto B 2 A would replay onto B all commits after 2 up to HEAD of A.

  • why you've wrote $(git merge-base master A)? I don't see a difference if git rebase --onto B master A would be used. Probably you wanted to get a child of commit you will receive for $(git merge-base master A). – Marek R Jan 8 '17 at 10:55
  • @MarekR Because the OP mentioned: when I rebase, branchA becomes: 0 -> 1 -> 2 -> 6 -> 4 -> 5: to be sure to not include 6, I used rebase --onto. You are probably right though, a simple rebase could be enough here. – VonC Jan 8 '17 at 11:04
  • Sadly simple rebase will not do the job, since he doesn't want to rebase whole branch branchA, he wants to omit commit 3. IMO cherry-pick is a best approach or he should do rebase using hash value of commit 3. – Marek R Jan 8 '17 at 22:02
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If there are only few commits to deal with and you don't need automatic solution, you can use cherry-pick. Simply perform git cherry-pick commit when on target branch to copy commits from another branch to your current branch.

Another way is to use git rebase -i. Git will give you list of commits to be rebased, and lets you edit the list so you can adjust what is to be rebased and how.

Both ways are more or less manual, but they may be useful for one-time fixes. If you need automated solution for this, you are likely doing something wrong.

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