6

I have an Array with duplicate values.

I want to create a Set to get the distinct values of that array and remove or create a new Array that will have the same data MINUS the elements required to create the Set.

This is not just a matter of remove the duplicates, but remove a SINGLE entry of a each distinct value in the original array

Something like that works, but I wonder if there is a more direct approach:

let originalValues = [
  'a',
  'a',
  'a',
  'b',
  'b',
  'c',
  'c',
  'd'
];

let distinct = new Set(originalValues);
/*
distinct -> { 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd' }
*/

// Perhaps originalValues.extract(distinct) ??
for (let val of distinct.values()) {
  const index = originalValues.indexOf(val);
  originalValues.splice(index, 1);
}

/* 
originalValues -> [
  'a',
  'a',
  'b',
  'c'
];
*/
8
  • 1
    If originalValues starts with 'a', 'a', 'a', should it end with 'a', 'a' or just 'a'?
    – Ry-
    Commented Jan 8, 2017 at 14:46
  • It should just remove one, so 'a', 'a' Commented Jan 8, 2017 at 14:50
  • 1
    Reopening because this is about removing elements that appear in the set, not about removing duplicates.
    – Oriol
    Commented Jan 8, 2017 at 14:54
  • 1
    originalValues.splice(index, 1); ?
    – dandavis
    Commented Jan 8, 2017 at 14:55
  • 1
    in that code, watch out for splicing (w/remove) an index of -1, that can ruin your day!
    – dandavis
    Commented Jan 8, 2017 at 14:57

6 Answers 6

5

Use Array#filter in combination with the Set:

const originalValues = ['a', 'a', 'a', 'b', 'b', 'c',  'c', 'd'];

const remainingValues = originalValues.filter(function(val) {
  if (this.has(val)) { // if the Set has the value
    this.delete(val); // remove it from the Set
    return false; // filter it out
  }

  return true;
}, new Set(originalValues));



console.log(remainingValues);

3
  • Thanks @Rajesh I will keep that in mind. I was approaching the problem in the wrong direction so I could not clearly explain my point. I will try harder next time :) Commented Jan 8, 2017 at 15:21
  • 1
    @Rajesh - Set is better if you don't want the complexity to be O(n^2) because Array#indexOf will iterate the originalValues every time.
    – Ori Drori
    Commented Jan 8, 2017 at 15:26
  • If performance is a concern here, I would recommend using a plain object over Set, as creating the set will inevitably have it's own performance cost.
    – Andrew
    Commented Jan 8, 2017 at 17:57
3

You could use closure over a Set and check for existence.

let originalValues = ['a', 'a', 'a', 'b', 'b', 'c', 'c', 'd'],
    result = originalValues.filter((s => a => s.has(a) || !s.add(a))(new Set));

console.log(result);

2

You should not use indexOf inside a loop, because it has linear cost, and the total cost becomes quadratic. What I would do is use a map to count the occurrences of each item in your array, and then convert back to an array subtracting one occurrence.

let originalValues = ['a', 'a', 'a', 'b', 'b', 'c', 'c', 'd'];
let freq = new Map(); // frequency table
for (let item of originalValues)
  if (freq.has(item)) freq.set(item, freq.get(item)+1);
  else freq.set(item, 1);
var arr = [];
for (let [item,count] of freq)
  for (let i=1; i<count; ++i)
    arr.push(item);
console.log(arr);

If all items are strings you can use a plain object instead of a map.

3
  • @FarooqKhan d only appears once, and one occurrence is removed. So it's expected.
    – Oriol
    Commented Jan 8, 2017 at 15:02
  • i guess not by looking at the comment 'this is about removing elements that appear in the set, not about removing duplicates' d occurs once so it should not fall in criteria at all. Commented Jan 8, 2017 at 15:04
  • True! Your answer also solve it quite well using a frequency table. And good catch pointing out the use of indexOf inside a loop. Commented Jan 8, 2017 at 15:09
1

You can create a simple Array.prototype.reduce loop with a hash table to count the number of occurrences and populate the result only if it occurs more than once.

See demo below:

var originalValues=['a','a','a','a','b','b','b','c','c','d'];

var result = originalValues.reduce(function(hash) {
  return function(p,c) {
    hash[c] = (hash[c] || 0) + 1;
    if(hash[c] > 1)
      p.push(c);
    return p;  
  };     
}(Object.create(null)), []);

console.log(result);
.as-console-wrapper{top:0;max-height:100%!important;}

0
1

Instead of using Set for this you could just use reduce() and create new array with unique values and also update original array with splice().

let oV = ["a", "a", "a", "a", "b", "b", "c", "c", "d"]

var o = {}
var distinct = oV.reduce(function(r, e) {
  if (!o[e]) o[e] = 1 && r.push(e) && oV.splice(oV.indexOf(e), 1)
  return r;
}, [])

console.log(distinct)
console.log(oV)

1

As an alternate approach, you can use following algorithm that will remove only 1st entry of a duplicate element. If not duplicate, it will not remove anything.

const originalValues = ['a', 'a', 'a', 'b', 'b', 'c', 'c', 'd'];

var r = originalValues.reduce(function(p, c, i, a) {
  var lIndex = a.lastIndexOf(c);
  var index = a.indexOf(c)
  if (lIndex === index || index !== i)
    p.push(c);
  return p
}, [])

console.log(r)


If duplicates are not case, then you can directly remove first iteration directly

const originalValues = ['a', 'a', 'a', 'b', 'b', 'c', 'c', 'd'];

var r = originalValues.filter(function(el, i) {
  return originalValues.indexOf(el) !== i
})

console.log(r)

2
  • 1
    don't pass a custom this to filter() if you don't use it; it only slows things down... also, the third callback param can prevent having to use a closure, letting your callback become generic and re-usable.
    – dandavis
    Commented Jan 8, 2017 at 15:21
  • @dandavis Thanks for pointing it out. Copied my initial code that used .reduce and forgot to remove []. I have updated my answer
    – Rajesh
    Commented Jan 8, 2017 at 15:23

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