-9

This question seems to have been asked many times before but the answers just poo-poo or pee-pee around the issue. I want to find a source in official documentation and standards where this issue is addressed. Apparently, "std" is implied by the files included with #include. Does it mean that there is no explicit "namespace std {...}" anywhere and "std" is like a keyword? I want to know the official definition of this keyword. I want to know how and what is included in "std", everything that is not covered by the definition of a regular namespace with explicit "namespace name"

closed as unclear what you're asking by Nicol Bolas, max66, juanchopanza, Krease, Mike Kinghan Jan 9 '17 at 14:43

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 3
    "Apparently, "std" is implied by the files included with #include." Um, no it isn't. Why do you think that? It is declared by the results of those inclusions; it isn't "implied" at all. – Nicol Bolas Jan 8 '17 at 19:13
  • 2
    Why should there be "anything that is not covered by the definition of a regular namespace with explicit "namespace name"" at all. – MikeMB Jan 8 '17 at 19:15
  • 2
    In a sense you might be right: The standard doesn't require there to be any standard library headers at all (All declarations and definitions mentioned in the standard could all be intrinsically provided by the compiler). In that case there would be no explicit namespace std but the implementation would still need to behave as if there was one. – MikeMB Jan 8 '17 at 19:25
  • 3
    Why do you think there is no explicit namespace std in the headers? – ccarton Jan 8 '17 at 19:27
3

[contents]/2 All library entities except macros, operator new and operator delete are defined within the namespace std or namespaces nested within namespace std...

2

No, it's not implied by #include in any way. Why would you think so?

I've just opened iostream file in my MinGW-w64 (GCC) setup and was easily able to find

namespace std

line.

I assume most (if not all) compilers explicitly define this namespace too.

0

std works just as every other namespace else:

namespace mynamespace {
    struct test {};
}
mynamespace::test

when you use Visual Studio there are defines:

_STD_BEGIN // equal to namespace mynamespace {
struct IAmInNameSpaceStd {};
_STD_END // equal to }

you will find something like that, in every header file that belongs to STL.

On VS 2013 the defines are written in file yvals.h 523-524:

#define _STD_BEGIN  namespace std {
#define _STD_END        }

If you open for example iostream you find now either:

_STD_BEGIN

or

namespace std {

or with another compiler something else. But in one way or another, it is written there. No magick involved.

0

The whole std namespace is not defined in one particular source/header file.

Namespaces are open so that means you can add to them.

Each header file in the standard c++ library adds its particular stuff to the std namespace.

for example:

#include <vector> will add the vector's related bits. 
0

namespace std is not implied.

On my Ubuntu, I can go to directory

/usr/include/c++/5, 

and perform

grep --color -nH -e namespace *

More than 200 occurrences are found. A quick scan suggest half are declaration, and half are comments (at end of the block), as in these last 2 files:

utility:77:namespace std _GLIBCXX_VISIBILITY(default)
utility:268:} // namespace
valarray:44:namespace std _GLIBCXX_VISIBILITY(default)
valarray:87:} // namespace
valarray:92:namespace std _GLIBCXX_VISIBILITY(default)
valarray:585:} // namespace
valarray:594:namespace std _GLIBCXX_VISIBILITY(default)
valarray:1233:} // namespace

There are about 10 (sub)directories in this directory. One I have visited several times is 'bits'

/usr/include/c++/5/bits

This directory also has about 200 uses of the namespace std, and a few other namespaces (i.e. not std).

So in two grep efforts, I have perhaps found about 200 contributions to the std namespace. namespace std is clearly not implied.


I want to find a source in official documentation and standards where this issue is addressed.

good luck with that.

I suspect somewhere at sometime the language authors agreed (in some manner) that this namespace name would be 'std' instead of something else ... might there be a letter or perhaps meeting minutes about the issue?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.