9

I am doing Python on Codecademy trying to censor out a word in a text. The code works but if the last word in the text has the word, it will not be censored.

I believe the for statement needs altering such as for x in (text + 1) but of course that causes an error. We are not to use built-in functions such as replace() Any ideas?

def censor(text,word):
    text = text.split()
    for x in text:
        if x == word:
            text[text.index(x)] = "*" * len(word)
    return " ".join(text)

print(censor("You dirty guy and dirty boy dirty.", "dirty"))

This returns [You ***** guy and ***** boy dirty.]

3
  • 5
    I suggest you use str.replace or re.sub
    – Dmitry
    Commented Jan 9, 2017 at 10:47
  • 2
    I agree seems wierd you cant use replace but you can use split, index, len, join and print. All are built-ins
    – crowie
    Commented Jan 9, 2017 at 14:13
  • 1
    You could change your test to strip the punctuation: if x.translate(None, string.punctuation) == word:
    – samgak
    Commented Jan 9, 2017 at 21:06

5 Answers 5

18

It's probably including the full stop in the last token, so it is comparing "dirty." with "dirty".

2
  • 6
    Are you intentionally avoiding proposing a solution (since the question is in the context of Code Academy)? Commented Jan 9, 2017 at 16:30
  • Yes, I find its easier to learn when people point me to the answer but don't fully answer it. Commented Jan 10, 2017 at 12:12
14

The last occurrence of dirty is 'dirty.' instead of 'dirty'. It might be easier to use the replace function:

def censor(text,word):
    return text.replace(word, len(word)*'*')

Without built-in functions:

def censor(text,word):
    while 1:
        wordPosition = text.find(word)
        if wordPosition < 0:
            break
        text = text[:wordPosition] + len(word)*'*' + text[wordPosition+len(word):]
    return text
3
  • 2
    He did mention "We are not to use built-in functions such as replace()".
    – vpibano
    Commented Jan 9, 2017 at 10:49
  • How does this handle cases where the word to censor might be part of a larger word? For example, does 'ass' get censored only when it appears as a word, or does it also get censored in 'assassin'? Commented Jan 9, 2017 at 16:32
  • 2
    Yes, for now it will censor 'assassin' - you should implement a find function to look for real words ... Commented Jan 9, 2017 at 16:45
6

Christopher is correct that it's comparing dirty to dirty. with a period. As you said you cannot use replace function, so you could change your if statement to be

if x.startswith(word) == True:
2
  • 4
    If you extend this out to a profanity filter then the residents of Crapstone likely would not appreciate this approach
    – JonK
    Commented Jan 9, 2017 at 16:05
  • Just if x.startswith(word): please, there is no need for explicit comparisons to True or False in a Python if statement.
    – zwol
    Commented Jan 9, 2017 at 20:48
1

That's due to the last dirty having . so thus, there's difference between dirty and dirty(.). Here is a way to tackle the problem :

def censor(text, word):
    wordlist = text.split()
    new_words_list = []
    for item in wordlist:
        if item.find(word) > -1:
            new_words_list.append( '*' * len(word))
        else:
            new_words_list.append(item)
    return " ".join(new_words_list)

print(censor("You dirty guy and dirty boy dirty.", "dirty"))

Output:

You ***** guy and ***** boy *****
2
  • 3
    Are you intentionally avoiding proposing a solution (since the question is in the context of Code Academy)? Commented Jan 9, 2017 at 16:33
  • @Darthfett Yeah.But I added code now to tackle the problem.Someone/OP might find it useful. Commented Jan 10, 2017 at 14:34
1

You can use re.sub to replace the work from text

import re
re.sub("word", "new_replaced_word", text)

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