19

I am running the below query to get 3rd highest salary from employee table and it worked correctly, but I can't understand its logic. How does the sub-query values match the main query(left part). Can someone please explain what is the logic working behind this query?

select e1.salary 
from employee as e1 
where 3 = (select count(salary) 
           from employee as e2 
           where e1.salary<=e2.salary)

PS: I can understand the count() returns number of rows (where all records are unique).

4
  • 6
    For someone at a very basic level of understanding; why do this so complicated? Can't you accomplish this with RANK or ROW_NUMBER with in combination with ORDER BY? Is there an inherit value in doing it like OPs example? – Stian Yttervik Jan 9 '17 at 12:45
  • 2
    @StianYttervik I would guess whoever wrote it doesn't know RANK or ROW_NUMBER exist – Caleth Jan 9 '17 at 14:08
  • 2
    Okay, close voters. The heck is wrong with you all? This is nowhere near a recommendation question. (Seriously, where did you even get that?) And the question is sufficiently clear, as evidenced by several nice answers explaining what the query does. I'd even argue this question isn't "basic"; it's not unreasonable to be confused by that query when you're still grasping SQL fundamentals. (Heck, even if you know your way around SQL, it could take a minute staring at it to figure it out.) If you're gonna vote to close, figure out a good reason first. – jpmc26 Jan 9 '17 at 23:11
  • @jpmc26 - I agree. I guess the issue is the title and people not reading beyond that. If it was titled "How to select the 3rd highest value in a table?" it might get less close votes. – Martin Brown Jan 10 '17 at 9:45
5

Every salary in employee table e1 will be passed to the sub-query. Sub-query will find all the salaries those are less than the passed salary and count it.

For a passed salary if the sub-query returns count as 3 then that salary will resulted

consider there are 5 records in employee table

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

when 1 is passed from e1, the sub-query will be like

select e1.salary 
from employee as e1 
where 3 = (select count(salary) 
           from employee as e2 
           where 1<=e2.salary)

now the count inside sub-query will be 8 because all the records are greater than or equal to 1. Count is not equal to 3 so salary 1 will not be returned


when 2 is passed from e1, the sub-query will be like

select e1.salary 
from employee as e1 
where 3 = (select count(salary) 
           from employee as e2 
           where 2<=e2.salary)

now the count inside sub-query will be 7 because except 1 all the records are greater than or equal to 2. Count is not equal to 3 so Salary 2 it will not be returned


when 6 is passed from e1, the sub-query will be like

select e1.salary 
from employee as e1 
where 3 = (select count(salary) 
           from employee as e2 
           where 6<=e2.salary)

Now there are three records greater than or equal to 6 (ie) 6,7,8 so the count will be 3 and condition is satisfied. So salary 6 will be returned

3
  • I want to clear subquery process after Where clause, suppose if i have 4 records like 25000, 15000, 10000, 17000. then how subquery will execute on these values if i want to get 3rd highest salary? – Jason Clark Jan 10 '17 at 3:37
  • could you please explain me what will be the e2.salary value with respect to each count() – Jason Clark Jan 10 '17 at 3:47
  • according to your answer i can understand how the count() is working but can't understand how it applying condition on values. there are 4 random values on my table which i have mentioned in above comment. i want to know how these values are processing in subquery? – Jason Clark Jan 10 '17 at 4:04
21

This query is basically saying:

for each row in employee assign to e1
    count = 0
    for each row in employee assign to e2
        if e1.salary <= e2.salary
            count = count + 1
        end if
    end for
    if count = 3
        add e1 to result set
    end if
end for
return result set

In summary for every row in the employee table it is visiting the table a second time and counting the number of rows with a lower or equal salary. If there are exactly 3 it will add the row to the result.

It is worth pointing out that this may well go wrong if there is more than one employee with the same salary. What you probably want is a query with a ranking function instead. Something like this:

SELECT salary
FROM
    (SELECT 
        salary
        ,DENSE_RANK () OVER (ORDER BY salary DESC) [rank]
    FROM employee) t
WHERE
    [rank] = 3

What exactly is meant by "3rd Highest" is perhaps a bit ambiguous. If we have salaries 8, 8, 6, 5 the above will return 5. If we wanted 6 you would need to change the DENSE_RANK to ROW_NUMBER like this:

SELECT salary
FROM
    (SELECT 
        salary
        ,ROW_NUMBER () OVER (ORDER BY salary DESC) [rank]
    FROM employee) t
WHERE
    [rank] = 3

The DENSE_RANK version above also suffers from returning multiple rows if there is a tie for third place. Whether this is desirable or not depends upon exactly what is required but it is possible to cut this down by using an aggregate function on the salary.

SELECT MAX(salary)
FROM
    (SELECT 
        salary
        ,DENSE_RANK() OVER (ORDER BY salary desc) [rank]
    FROM employee) t
WHERE
    [rank] = 3
0
6

Consider these values:

Salary:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

e1  e2
1   1
2   2
3   3
4   4
5   5
6   6
7   7
8   8

For e1.1 there are 8 rows in e2 that are greater or equal to e1.1.

For e1.2 there are 7 rows in e2 that are greater or equal to e1.2.

...

For e1.6 there are 3 rows in e2 that are greater or equal to e1.6.

This is quite a strange and confusing select statement. I would just rewrite it using DENSE_RANK window function, because if you have several rows with the same salary, you will not get correct results:

DECLARE @t TABLE ( i INT )
INSERT  INTO @t
VALUES  ( 1 ),
        ( 2 ),
        ( 3 ),
        ( 4 ),
        ( 5 ),
        ( 6 ),
        ( 8 ),
        ( 8 );


WITH    cte
          AS ( SELECT   * ,
                        DENSE_RANK() OVER ( ORDER BY i DESC ) AS rn
               FROM     @t
             )
    SELECT  *
    FROM    cte
    WHERE   rn = 3

Results in 5 while your initial select statement will result in 6 that I believe is not third highest salary at all.

1
  • 2
    To most people, "The third highest salary" means the salary of the third highest salaried person, so the expected result of 5, 6, 8, 8 would be 6. – Klas Lindbäck Jan 9 '17 at 12:23
1

In fact it's quite simple. The second query selects all the employees for which the current (selected) employee (e1) has a lower salary. We then say the number of employees with a lower or equal salary needs to be 3. Which results in getting the 3rd highest salary.

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