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This question already has an answer here:

As we know that ../ means one step back and / means the current place but i am confused about the ./ when working with my web site and found that. Can anyone explain ?

marked as duplicate by Quentin javascript Jan 9 '17 at 15:09

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. means this directory

.. means the parent directory

/ is the directory separator (for Linux/Unix)

When using include "file.php"; php will look in the current directory and in his configured include path for a file named file.php

When using include "./file.php"; php will look in the current directory (and only there) for a file named file.php

if you use include "../file.php"; php will look in the parent directory for a file named file.php

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./ - current directory.
/ - it is root directory (it used often for concatenating paths as directory separator, because previous path doesn't contain leading slash, for example host + '/' + cssFile).

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  • / represents the root of a folder structure. For a website, it's the root folder, where you would usually put the index.html of the landing page.
  • ./ represents the 'current' folder, relative with the current file. If you open the 'index.html' file in the root folder, then ./ will be the same as /. If you are in a subfolder of the root, like /css/ for example, then ./ will be the same as /css/.
  • ../ represents the parent folder. If you are in /css/, then ../ will be the same as /, the root folder.
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Lets say this is your working on a file called process.php in the following directory:

/app/form/process.php

The this is what those symbols mean:

/ = root directory, or in the example: /

./ = current directory, or in the example: /app/form/

../ = one directory back, in the example: app/

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    Clear and concise examples. – uom-pgregorio Jan 9 '17 at 15:02
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    ... and wrong. / is /, not /app, ./ is /app/form/, not /form/, and ../ is /app/, not /form – CCH Jan 9 '17 at 15:04
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    @CCH thanks for pointing that out – CodeGodie Jan 9 '17 at 15:09