7

In the example below, I would like the know the number of 010 sequences, or the number of 1010 sequences. Below is a workable example;

x <- c(1,0,0,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,1,0,1,0,1,0,1,0,1,0)

In this example, the number of 010 sequences would be 6 and the number of 1010 sequences would be 4.

What would be the most efficient/simplest way to count the number of consecutive sequences?

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  • This works for the first case sum(diff(diff(x)) == -2) but someone can check where if it fails anywhere. – candles_and_oranges Jan 9 '17 at 19:34
7

Another solution would be this:

library(stringr)
x <- c(1,0,0,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,1,0,1,0,1,0,1,0,1,0)
xx = paste0(x, collapse = "")
str_count(xx, '(?<=010)')
[1] 6

str_count(xx, '(?<=1010)')
[1] 4

As @Pierre Lafortune pointed out in the comments this can be done without using any packages:

length(gregexpr("(?<=010)", xx, perl=TRUE)[[1]])
[1] 6
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  • hey this is cool!! i need to learn this package very soon i guess!! :) I was busy trying using base R – joel.wilson Jan 9 '17 at 19:26
  • 1
    Yes the output is incorrect in both cases. I think the codes are rolling forward and not taking account of all the observations. For instance for "1010" the answer should be 4. – Johnny Jan 9 '17 at 19:36
  • 1
    Excellent except the second one ("1010") has an extra ' it doesn't need – Johnny Jan 9 '17 at 19:40
  • 5
    No need for the complicated set up length(gregexpr("(?<=010)", xx, perl=TRUE)[[1]]) – candles_and_oranges Jan 9 '17 at 19:41
  • 3
    Nor are any packages necessary. – candles_and_oranges Jan 9 '17 at 19:41
10

A stringless way:

f = function(x, patt){
  if (length(x) == length(patt)) return(as.integer(x == patt))
  w = head(seq_along(x), 1L-length(patt))
  for (k in seq_along(patt)) w <- w[ x[w + k - 1L] == patt[k] ]
  w
}

length(f(x, patt = c(0,1,0))) # 6
length(f(x, patt = c(1,0,1,0))) # 4

Alternatives. From @cryo11, here's another way:

function(x,patt) sum(apply(embed(x,length(patt)),1,function(x) all(!xor(x,patt))))

or another variation:

function(x,patt) sum(!colSums( xor(patt, t(embed(x,length(patt)))) ))

or with data.table:

library(data.table)
setkey(setDT(shift(x, seq_along(patt), type = "lead")))[as.list(patt), .N]

(The shift function is very similar to embed.)

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  • +1 for the "stringless" way. Here another one: f=function(x,patt) sum(apply(embed(x,length(patt)),1,function(x) all(!xor(x,patt)))). This one does not need an outer length. – cryo111 Jan 9 '17 at 20:51
  • @cryo111 Cool, never thought of using xor for that! I guess there are also ways to use the embed with ==, transpose/sweep, and col or row sums. – Frank Jan 9 '17 at 21:00
5

logic : take a substr of length of pattern you are searching for and compare it with the pattern.

xx = paste0(x, collapse = "")
# [1] "1001000111001010101010"
# case 1 :
xxx = "010"
sum(sapply(1:(length(x)-nchar(xxx)+1), function(i) substr(xx,i,i+nchar(xxx)-1)==xxx))
# [1] 6

# case 2 :
xxx = "1010"
# [1] 4
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3

R introduced the startsWith function in 3.3.0. Using this and substring, we can implement @joel.wilson's method as

sum(startsWith(substring(paste(x, collapse=""),
                         head(seq_along(x), -2), tail(seq_along(x), -2)), "010"))

Here, substring constructs all three character adjacent sets and startsWith tests if each of these is the same as "010". The TRUE values are then summed together.

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