17

http://openpyxl.readthedocs.io/en/default/_modules/openpyxl/workbook/workbook.html?highlight=set%20active%20sheet

The documentation shows a Workbook object has an active property:

@property
def active(self):
    """Get the currently active sheet"""
    return self._sheets[self._active_sheet_index]

@active.setter
def active(self, value):
    """Set the active sheet"""
    self._active_sheet_index = value

If wb = openpyxl.Workbook() is calling wb.active, it gives the title of the default first worksheet, which is Sheet.

Say I create another sheet, ws1 = wb.create_sheet('another sheet'), how do I "set" this to be the active sheet?

The documentation shows there is an active "setter" also called active. It takes an extra argument, an integer index value.

How come wb.active(1) does not work? Am I not calling the function with

3

6 Answers 6

32

Later versions of openpyxl allow the active sheet to be set directly:

wb.active = wb['sheet_name']

Use the following in demonstration:

# Set Active Sheet
wb.active = wb['charlie']

For earlier versions, a demonstration to save the workbook, allowing any chosen process to be verified:

This is a different approach of setting active sheet in workbook by sheet name. There are similar answers (Get sheet by name using openpyxl and others did not have enough detail for me to understand this functionality).

The Manipulating a workbook in memory tutorial is the place to start and under the answer I have used this tutorial to demonstrate there is no active sheet name, it is actually the sheet at the active index. A different sheet will become active if adding or deleting a sheet changes the sheet at the index position.

Initially I thought .create_sheet made the sheet active, but then I realised I had only created the sheet at the active sheet index which happened to be 0. The index can be set to a value greater than the number of sheets and the docs also contain a note that "If the sheet set to active is hidden return the next visible sheet or None".

Verbose short answer

for i, s in enumerate(wb.sheetnames):
    if s == 'charlie':
        break
wb.active = i

Feel free to improve this answer.

Demonstration

py

Interactive session:

Python 3.10.2 (tags/v3.10.2:a58ebcc, Jan 17 2022, 14:12:15) [MSC v.1929 64 bit (AMD64)] on win32
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> # http://openpyxl.readthedocs.io/en/2.5/tutorial.html#create-a-workbook
>>> from openpyxl import Workbook
>>> wb = Workbook()
>>> print(wb.sheetnames)
['Sheet']
>>>
>>> print(wb.active)
<Worksheet "Sheet">
>>> ws = wb.active
>>> ws.title = "alpha"
>>>
>>> ws = wb.create_sheet('bravo')
>>> print(wb.sheetnames)
['alpha', 'bravo']
>>> print(wb.active)
<Worksheet "alpha">
>>>
>>> ws = wb.create_sheet('charlie',0)  # insert at index 0
>>> print(wb.sheetnames)
['charlie', 'alpha', 'bravo']
>>> print(wb.active)
<Worksheet "charlie">
>>>
>>>
>>> wb.active = 1
>>> print(wb.active)
<Worksheet "alpha">
>>>
>>> wb.active = 2
>>> print(wb.active)
<Worksheet "bravo">
>>>
>>> wb.active = 0
>>> print(wb.active)
<Worksheet "charlie">
>>>
>>> wb.active = 3
>>> print(wb.active)
None
>>>
>>> ws = wb.create_sheet(index=0)  # insert at index
>>> print(wb.active)
<Worksheet "bravo">
>>> print(wb.sheetnames)
['Sheet', 'charlie', 'alpha', 'bravo']
>>>
>>>
>>> ws_active = wb.get_sheet_by_name('charlie')
<stdin>:1: DeprecationWarning: Call to deprecated function get_sheet_by_name (Use wb[sheetname]).
>>> ws_active = wb['charlie']
>>> print(wb.active)
<Worksheet "bravo">
>>> ws4 = wb["charlie"] # from https://stackoverflow.com/a/36814135/4539999
>>> print(wb.active)
<Worksheet "bravo">
>>>
>>> # Set Active Sheet
>>> for i, s in enumerate(wb.sheetnames):
...     if s == 'charlie':
...         break
...
>>> wb.active = i
>>>
>>> # Confirm Active Sheet
>>> print(wb.active)
<Worksheet "charlie">
>>>
>>> # Open workbook to verify
>>> wb.save("Demo.xlsx")
6
  • Thanks. I looked into the code for this, and that is where I found the @ type function. We came to the same conclusion about the syntax. =)
    – VISQL
    Commented May 3, 2018 at 15:19
  • Issue logged: https://bitbucket.org/openpyxl/openpyxl/issues/1033/active-sheet-index-not-updated-on-sheet
    – flywire
    Commented May 3, 2018 at 21:05
  • henry434's one-liner consistent with other packages works
    – DrWhat
    Commented Feb 2, 2022 at 13:24
  • No, see comment active_sheet = wb['sheet name'] doesn't set anything.
    – flywire
    Commented Mar 25, 2022 at 2:23
  • You have a bug in your demonstration. Setting ws_active but printing ws.active.
    – henry434
    Commented Mar 26, 2022 at 10:12
6

It doesn't look like a typical function call, but to use the "setter" you would write:

wb.active = 1

Which "eats" the 1 =) and changes the active sheet.

1
  • This has tripped me up recently. The Workbook object uses .__setattr__() to intercept the assignment (and hence change the logic of it), and .__getattr__() to return something else when the property is read. This really is bad practice but I guess we just can't have it all...
    – polemon
    Commented Dec 13, 2019 at 6:09
3

Use:

sheets = wb.get_sheet_names()
for i in sheets:
    if i == 'xyz':
        wb.active = i
        break

Or you can simply do

xyz_sheet = wb.get_sheet_by_name('xyz')
wb.active = xyz_sheet

The workbook (i.e., wb) has the xyz sheet active now.

2
  • Function get_sheet_by_name was only included in stackoverflow.com/a/50117733/4539999 demonstration to highlight it is depreciated.
    – flywire
    Commented Mar 25, 2022 at 2:29
  • Isn't it more concise to write (taking into account get_sheet_by_name is deprecated): wb.active = wb['xyz'] Commented Mar 25, 2023 at 13:11
0

For reference, another useful way to do it - particularly when you want to call the sheet by its name:

wb = openpyxl.load_workbook(path/to/your/spreadsheet)
worksheet_names = wb.sheetnames # this variable is presented as a list, so we can manipulate it accordingly, but finding the index number using the name.
sheet_index = worksheet_names.index(<name of your target sheet>) # this will return the index number where your worksheet resides.  It should be mentioned that this sheet name must exist in the worksheet_names list variable
wb.active = sheet_index # this will activate the worksheet by index

You should now be working in the sheet of your choice, but the benefit here is that you have been able to call the sheet by name rather than by number.

0

If you know the name of the tab, you can write one line:

book.active = book.sheetnames.index('YourSheetName')
-2

This is the simplest way to set an active worksheet by name:

active_sheet = wb['sheet name']
3

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