3

I have this set of code:

 use strict; 
 use warnings; 
 my %hash = ( 5328 => 'Adorable', 
              26191 => '"Giraffe"', 
              57491 => 'Is Very', 
               4915 => 'Cute',);
 foreach (sort { ($hash{$a} cmp $hash{$b}) || ($a cmp $b) } keys %hash) 
 { print "$hash{$_}\n"; }

this will result as:

"Giraffe"

Adorable

Cute

Is Very

I need it to be ordered alphabetically, and disregard the special character before the AlphaNumeric character like in this sample:

Adorable

Cute

"Giraffe"

Is Very

Any suggestions?

  • 1
    build a hash with unquoted strings as keys and sort the keys. You can also trim each value in the comparison. – Casimir et Hippolyte Jan 9 '17 at 22:01
  • If the keys are numeric, you probably want to use <=> rather than cmp for the second-level sort. – Matt Jacob Jan 9 '17 at 22:15
  • Your data set is wrong. You need to remove the quotes before they get anywhere near your hash. Are you dealing with CSV data perhaps? – Borodin Jan 9 '17 at 22:28
  • Please clarify: is every alternate line in your data really blank? – Borodin Jan 9 '17 at 22:29
  • What is the source of the data that has built your hash %hash (and please don't call things @array or %hash or $scalar). It should be rewritten. – Borodin Jan 9 '17 at 22:44
7

You can simply do that (note that I changed the second cmp to the shuttle operator <=> for numeric values):

foreach (sort { ($hash{$a}=~s/^\W+//r cmp $hash{$b}=~s/^\W+//r) || ($a <=> $b) } keys %hash) {
    print "$hash{$_}\n";
}

But if you have a lot of data, it's better to transform your data (once and for all): For example using a schwartzian transform:

my @result = map { $_->[2] }
             sort { ($a->[0] cmp $b->[0]) || ($a->[1] <=> $b->[1]) }
             map { [ $hash{$_}=~s/^"|"$//gr, $_, $hash{$_}] } keys %hash; 

print join "\n", @result;
  • 4
    You might want to mention that you need Perl >= 5.14 to use /r. – Matt Jacob Jan 9 '17 at 22:16
  • works like a charm, thanks! – Xavia Jan 10 '17 at 14:06
5

Create a function which truncates special characters (truncate_special_chars in my case). Then, use it under your sort routine.

use strict;
use warnings;

my %hash = (
    5328 => 'Adorable',
    26191 => '"Giraffe"',
    57491 => 'Is Very',
    4915 => 'Cute',
    );


print join "\n", 
    map { $hash{$_ -> [0]} }
    sort { $a -> [1] cmp $b -> [1] || $a -> [0] <=> $b -> [0] }
    map { [ $_, truncate_special_chars($hash{$_}) ] }
    keys %hash;

sub truncate_special_chars {
    my $str = shift;
    $str =~ s/^\W//;
    # may be use lc if you want case insensitive sort
    return $str;
}

Otherwise you can use /r if you are using Perl >= 5.14.

  • You missed the case where $hash{$a} == $hash{$b}, it must be ordered by key. – Toto Jan 10 '17 at 10:10
  • @Toto Edited. I guess, it would be trivial, If I carry key instead of value :). – Arunesh Singh Jan 10 '17 at 10:49
  • I think you should do numeric comparison for the hash keys: sort { $a -> [1] cmp $b -> [1] || $a -> [0] <=> $b -> [0] }. – jreisinger Jan 10 '17 at 11:32
  • @jreisinger Done. – Arunesh Singh Jan 10 '17 at 11:34
2

Use a custom sort function that strips out the characters you want to ignore.

foreach (sort {
            my ($aa,$bb) = ($hash{$a},$hash{$b});
            s/["]//g for $aa,$bb; # ignore " char. Add whatever else you want
            $aa cmp $bb           # or lc($aa) cmp lc($bb) case-insensitive search
                || $a cmp $b
       } keys %hash) { ... }
  • You could include a Schwartzian transform to make it faster. Stripping out stuff all the time is expensive. – simbabque Jan 9 '17 at 23:02
  • 1
    Yes, a Schwartzian transform is worthwhile when the input is large and the transformations to the input before comparing are expensive. – mob Jan 9 '17 at 23:09
2

Try as follows

use strict; 
use warnings; 
my %hash = ( 5328 => 'Adorable', 
      26191 => '"Giraffe"', 
      57491 => 'Is Very', 
       4915 => 'Cute',);

foreach (sort{my ($one)=$hash{$a}=~m/([\w\s]+)/; my ($two)=$hash{$b}=~m/([\w\s]+)/; $one cmp $two} keys %hash) 
{ 
    print "$hash{$_}\n"; 
}

Group the elements and store into $one and $two then compare it.

But it is very easy with @Casimir et Hippolyte answer. He used non-destructive modifier(r). but it will support above the 5.14 version

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