4

Using FW 4.5.1 I have a method:

void DoSomething(string s)

I want to allow the function to accept int as well, but under the same parameter s. That means I want to write:

void DoSomething(var s)

and sometimes s will be int, sometimes string.

How can I achieve this?

  • 5
    void DoSomething(object s) – fubo Jan 10 '17 at 14:13
  • 8
    Or just overload it: write void DoSomething(int x) as well as void DoSomething(string s). This is more appropriate if you only want it to handle int and` string`. Or you could use generics. – Jon Skeet Jan 10 '17 at 14:14
  • Why do you want to allow int and string? Is the string-overload just doing a simple int.Parse? – Andreas Niedermair Jan 10 '17 at 14:17
  • var does not mean that the type can be anything; it means that the variable has exactly one type, and that type is inferred by the compiler from context at compile time instead of being explicitly stated by the programmer. That's relatively easy (for certain values of "easy") with a variable that is declared once; for functions, they gave us generics instead. – Ed Plunkett Jan 10 '17 at 14:21
  • @EdPlunkett don't you forget about dynamic, ExpandoObject, ... – Andreas Niedermair Jan 10 '17 at 14:23
17

Three options for you to consider, depending on what you're actually trying to achieve:

Use overloads

public void DoSomething(int s) { ... }
public void DoSomething(string s) { ... }

This will only accept int and string - which could be a good or a bad thing, depending on what you're trying to achieve. If you really only want to be able to accept int and string, this is the best solution IMO.

Use object

public void DoSomething(object s) { ... }

This will allow you to pass in anything.

Use generics

public void DoSomething<T>(T value) { ... }

This will still allow you to pass in anything, but will provide a bit more type safety if (say) you want to later accept two values which have to be the same type (or at least compatible types)

  • 2
    I think it would be best to edit the answer to have the overloads at the top seeing as this is the one you think to be best – TheLethalCoder Jan 10 '17 at 14:35
  • 1
    @TheLethalCoder: Done - although it very much depends on context, which we don't have much of... – Jon Skeet Jan 10 '17 at 14:53
11

You can achieve what you want with overloads.

void DoSomething(string s){ DoSomething(int.Parse(s)); }
void DoSomething(int s){ /* Your code here */ }

Or the other way around:

void DoSomething(string s){ /* Your code here */ }
void DoSomething(int s){ DoSomething(s.ToString()); }
  • SRP: is the class really responsible for dealing with "broken" input parameters, or is it the callers responsibility to provide a valid input? – Andreas Niedermair Jan 10 '17 at 14:16
  • The idea is to provide backwards compatibility, so it need to be smooth for the 100 places in the code that call this function. – Itay.B Jan 10 '17 at 14:18
  • 1
    @Itay.B Thanks for the clarification - yet, I suggest to follow the OCP to get rid of the extended class later on (which should be the ultimate target of your refactoring mission) - nevertheless, this issue is out of your question's scope :) – Andreas Niedermair Jan 10 '17 at 14:21
5

You can use generics

void MyMethod<T>(T param)
{
    if (typeof(T) == typeof(int))
    {
        // the object is an int
    }
    else if (typeof(T) == typeof(string))
    {
        // the object is a string
    }
}
  • Exactly what i was aiming for. Checking it right now. Thanks. – Itay.B Jan 10 '17 at 14:16
  • 4
    This doesn't feel terribly "generic" to me, as it only really handles two types - if only two types are meant to be supported, I'd use overloads instead. – Jon Skeet Jan 10 '17 at 14:17
  • I would just create two different methods here, no point in using generics if the code you are performing on them will be different – TheLethalCoder Jan 10 '17 at 14:17
  • 2
    Agreed @JonSkeet I was sure the OP wanted one method only but couldnt suggest a better implementation without the actual method OP wants to modify. – Carbine Jan 10 '17 at 14:19
1

You said that generics was what you was after (quoting the code here for reference):

void MyMethod<T>(T param)
{
    if (typeof(T) == typeof(int))
    {
        // the object is an int
    }
    else if (typeof(T) == typeof(string))
    {
        // the object is a string
    }
}

However, this isn't very generic and is actually doing two different actions depending on the type. This tells me you probably just want two different methods:

void DoSomethingWithString(string s)

void DoSomethingWithInt(int n)

If the code would be similar inside though use method overloading as @juunas suggested or use object as @Jon Skeet suggested.

If you have a lot of common code use method overloading to convert to an acceptable format and then call a common method. Obviously if the common format is string or int then just use method overloading.

void DoSomethingCommon(/*SomeCommonThing*/ thing)
  • But then ill have to duplicate the content of the methods? 60 lines of code. – Itay.B Jan 10 '17 at 14:25
  • @Itay.B Then either use a common method after converting to a common type or use one of the answers already suggested – TheLethalCoder Jan 10 '17 at 14:28
1

Overloads is the right answer 99.9999% of the time, but for the hell of it here's another answer. This is slightly better than using object because it will cause a compile-time error if the caller does not supply a value type.

static void DoSomething(IConvertible input)
{
    if (input is int)
    {
        //Do something
    }
    if (input is string)
    {
        //Do something
    }
    //etc....
}

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