0

In Java, is it safe to create a LinkedList in a method and return its iterator like so:

public Iterator<Integer> iterator()
{
   LinkedList<Integer> list = new LinkedList<>();
   list.add(1);
   return list.iterator();
}

Is there any chance the list will be garbage-collected after the method returns?

2

The code is safe, in the sense that as long as the Iterator is reachable from any active thread it cannot be finalized, and it will continue to work.

In theory, if the underlying List is unmodifiable, its iterator() implementation could make its own copy of the list data, and not keep any pointer to the List. In that case, the List could be garbage collected. The Iterator would continue to work.

In practice, all the iterator() implementations I've seen keep a reference to the Collection, either explicitly or by being an inner class. The Collection remains reachable as long as the Iterator is reachable.

  • CopyOnWriteArrayList has an iterator that does not prevent garbage collection of CopyOnWriteArrayList – k5_ Jan 10 '17 at 19:10
  • To be nitpicking, the word “finalized” is inappropriate, as there is no finalization involved. Further, while most iterator implementations have a formal reference to the collection instance, it does not prevent the Collection instance being considered unreachable in general. It depends on the optimization state of the code using the iterator, whether the JVM can determine that the Collection instance itself (in contrast to the actual data) is unused. But in order to not confuse beginners, the most important point is that the iterator will work correctly, which is what Java is all about. – Holger Jan 11 '17 at 12:01
  • @Holger How do you define "finalize" and related words? I was using "finalized" in the sense of the JLS 12.6. Finalization of Class Instances – Patricia Shanahan Jan 11 '17 at 19:12
  • Well, the question was about the object being collected (implying potentially reclaimed). Finalization is something that might happen at some time after the object’s collection or never at all. JLS§12.6 also suggests that JVM implementations should detect when classes don’t override Object.finalize() (which is the case for LinkedList) and optimize this, which implies skipping the finalization step altogether. This is the case for real life JVMs and 99% of all objects, so actual finalization is a rare special case. – Holger Jan 11 '17 at 19:26
  • @Holger By implication, your definition of "finalize" etc. is limited to calling, if necessary, the object's finalize() method. The JLS uses it in a much broader sense, and I used the term to help with index lookups and searches in the JLS. – Patricia Shanahan Jan 11 '17 at 19:57
1

As long as the iterator is around, the list will not be garbage-collected.

1

In all ways I can think of of initialising the iterator, it will have a reference to the LinkedList and hence will not be garbage collected.

1

As long as there is a pointer to the list it will not get affected by garbage collection.

So if you just call the method, there is no pointer:

iterator();

Here you have an pointer and as long as it persists, you don't have to fear garbage collection:

 Iterator<Integer> o = iterator();
0

I assume that you actually want to return an Iterable<Integer>. This is an interface which lists implement and an Iterable basically allows to iterate over the list.

public Iterable<Integer> iterator()
{
    LinkedList<Integer> list = new LinkedList<>();
    list.add(1);
    return list;
}

This is of course possible to downcast, but the Iterable interface would imply to the users that this is a bad idea. It will also require a bit of work from the user side to know that this is a LinkedList and not some other class implementing the same interface.

  • Thanks, but I think it's easier and safer to just return an iterator. – yyy Jan 10 '17 at 23:40
  • @yyy This is of course up to you, but if you want to iterate over the list a second time you might get in trouble (but this might not be the case). As far as I know an iterator iterates through all the elements once. A ListIterator is capable of going forward and backwards (but this also means you need to move all the way back to the beginning element by element). However it also have methods to remove, insert and set elements, thus it allows many features, the Iterable is meant to prevent. – patrik Jan 11 '17 at 7:43

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