3

I am using Xamarin.forms (PCL) and I need to refresh/update Content Page with its data every few seconds. The data is retrieved from API in the viewmodel.

Is there any method or handler that can be used periodically to call the Get Api periodically inside the page.xaml.cs, something like:

methodRunPeriodically()
{
 userdata = await UserService.GetUserasync(_UserViewModel.EmployeeId);
}

5 Answers 5

12

Xamarin.Forms has an API for starting a timer that you might find useful for this, documented here.

Device.StartTimer (TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10), () => {
    // If you want to update UI, make sure its on the on the main thread.
    // Otherwise, you can remove the BeginInvokeOnMainThread
    Device.BeginInvokeOnMainThread(() => methodRunPeriodically());
    return shouldRunAgain;
});
0
9

Based on the code in the above question, you would ensure that:

  1. Your userdata object implements IPropertyChange as follows:

    //Other usings skipped for brevity
    ...
    ...
    using System.ComponentModel;
    using System.Runtime.CompilerServices;
    
    // This is a simple user class that 
    // implements the IPropertyChange interface.
    public class DemoUser : INotifyPropertyChanged
    {
        // These fields hold the values for the public properties.
        private string userName = string.Empty;
        private string phoneNumber = string.Empty;
    
        public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
    
        // This method is called by the Set accessor of each property.
        // The CallerMemberName attribute that is applied to the optional propertyName
        // parameter causes the property name of the caller to be substituted as an argument.
        private void NotifyPropertyChanged([CallerMemberName] String propertyName = "")
        {
            if (PropertyChanged != null)
            {
                PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
            }
        }
    
        public DemoUser()
        {
        }
        public string Id { get; set; }
        public string UserName
        {
            get
            {
                return this.userName;
            }
    
            set
            {
                if (value != this.userName)
                {
                    this.userName = value;
                    NotifyPropertyChanged();
                }
            }
        }
    
        public string PhoneNumber
        {
            get
            {
                return this.phoneNumber;
            }
    
            set
            {
                if (value != this.phoneNumber)
                {
                    this.phoneNumber = value;
                    NotifyPropertyChanged();
                }
            }
        }
    }
    
  2. In your ContentPage, you then try the following, (I slightly modified the code by others above):

    public class UserPage : ContentPage
    {
        private DemoUser demoUser;
        private int intervalInSeconds;
    
        public UserPage()
        {
            //Assuming this is a XAML Page....
            InitializeComponent();
        }
        public UserPage(DemoUser demoUser, int intervalInSeconds = 10) : this()
        {
            this.demoUser = demoUser;
            this.intervalInSeconds = intervalInSeconds;
    
            this.BindingContext = this.demoUser; 
    
            Device.StartTimer(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(this.intervalInSeconds), () =>
            {
                Device.BeginInvokeOnMainThread(() => refreshDemoUser());
                return true;
            });
        }
    
        private async void refreshDemoUser()
        {
            this.demoUser = await getDemoUserById(this.demoUser.Id);
        }
    }
    
3

You can do as follows to run a Task when 10 seconds has passed. Returning true in Device.StartTimer will ensure that the Timer keeps running. Also, you want to ensure that you invoke the method on the main thread to update the UI:

public MyConstructor()
{
    StartTimer();
}

private void StartTimer()
{
    Device.StartTimer(System.TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10), () => 
    {
        Device.BeginInvokeOnMainThread(UpdateUserDataAsync);
        return true;
    });
}

private async void UpdateUserDataAsync()
{
    userdata = await UserService.GetUserasync(_UserViewModel.EmployeeId);
}

If your API doesn't expose an EventHandler that you can subscribe to, then you need to do as mentioned in my example above.

3
  • System.Threading.Timer is typically not available in Xamarin.Forms PCL compatible profiles. Jan 10, 2017 at 21:14
  • True. Updated my answer.
    – Demitrian
    Jan 10, 2017 at 21:45
  • It's better to use the bindings built into Xamarin.Forms to handle the UI updates. In this example, no updates will happen on the UI thread unless everything is bound to userdata and the setter calls OnPropertyChanged. If that is the case, then Device.BeginInvokeOnMainThread() is unnecessary.
    – BrewMate
    Jan 10, 2017 at 21:57
2

You should just bind the UI to properties in your ViewModel and then set those properties appropriately. Calling OnPropertyChanged() will trigger Xamarin.Forms to update the UI based on the bound properties. Something like below:

//Code in Page
public class MyPage : ContentPage
{
    public MyPage()
    {
        var entry = new Entry();
        BindingContext = new MyViewModel();

        entry.SetBinding<MyViewModel>(Entry.TextProperty, vm=>vm.EntryText);
        Content = entry;
    }
}

//Code in ViewModel
public class MyViewModel() : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public MyViewModel()
    {
        Task.Factory.StartNew(()=> methodRunPeriodically());
    }

    string entryText;
    public string EntryText
    {
        get { return entryText; }
        set
        {
            if(entryText == value)
                return;
            entryText = value;
            OnPropertyChanged();
        }
    }

    bool shouldRun = true;
    async Task methodRunPeriodically()
    {
        while(shouldRun)
        {
            userdata = await UserService.GetUserasync(_UserViewModel.EmployeeId);
            EntryText = userdata.FirstName;
            await Task.Delay(5000); //Run this every 5 seconds
        }
    }

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    protected void OnPropertyChanged([CallerMemberName] string propertyName = null)
    {
        PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;
        if (handler != null)
        {
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
        }
    }
}

In this pattern, we are kicking off a long-running task that will run in a loop. It is reaching out to refresh the userData every 5 seconds and then setting the EntryText property. In the setter of the EntryText property in our ViewModel, we are calling OnPropertyChanged() which will cause Xamarin.Forms to update the UI. Calling OnPropertyChanged() triggers Xamarin.Forms to switch thread context from the background task to the UI thread and then back to the background task.

I didn't write this in XAML, but the binding would be pretty much the same except the entry would be like below:

<Entry Text={Binding EntryText}/>

EDIT

@therealjohn's answer is good also. You could use that instead of my while loop like below:

bool shouldRun = true;
methodRunPeriodically()
{
    Device.StartTimer(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5), () => 
    {
        userdata = await UserService.GetUserasync(_UserViewModel.EmployeeId);
        EntryText = userdata.FirstName;
        return shouldRun;
    });
}

You can review what the Forms source code is doing with the Device.StartTimer on the native iOS and Android.

0
0

Update UI every one second:

        Device.StartTimer(TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(1000), loop2);
        bool loop2()
        {
            Device.BeginInvokeOnMainThread(() => updateUI());
            return true;
        }

or:

        Device.StartTimer(TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(1000), loop2);
        bool loop2()
        {
            Device.BeginInvokeOnMainThread(() => {
                updateUI();
                //more stuff;
            });
            return true;
        }

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.