45

I have an Object a like that:

const a = {
  user: {
   …
   groups: […]
   …
  }
}

whereby there are a lot more properties in a.user

And I would like to change only the a.user.groups value. If I do this:

const b = Object.assign({}, a, {
  user: {
    groups: {}
  }
});

b doesn't have any other Property except b.user.groups, all others are deleted. Is there any ES6 way to only change the nested property, without loosing all the other, with Object.assign?

  • 2
    imo it looks to be doing what Object.assign is supposed to. It's changing the user property with the new object you provided. If it's the only thing you want to change why don't you simply do b.user.groups = /* value */? – taguenizy Jan 11 '17 at 10:24
83

After some trying I could find a solution that looks pretty nice like that:

const b = Object.assign({}, a, {
  user: {
    ...a.user,
    groups: 'some changed value'
  }
});

To make that answer more complete here a tiny note:

const b = Object.assign({}, a)

is essentially the same as:

const b = { ...a }

since it just copies all the properties of a (...a) to a new Object. So the above can written as:

 const b = {
   ...a,          //copy everything from a
   user: {        //override the user property
      ...a.user,  //same sane: copy the everything from a.user
      groups: 'some changes value'  //override a.user.group
   }
 }
  • 1
    I upvoted because of explaining well and using syntaxic sugar :) Just passing by, if you want to return an array with a new element inside, it's basically the same mechanism : [ ...someArray, newElement ]. – Alex Jul 18 '18 at 13:56
6

You can change it this way,

const b = Object.assign({}, a, {
  user: Object.assign({}, a.user, {
          groups: {}
        })
});

or just do,

const b = Object.assign({}, a);
b.user.groups = {};
  • 10
    do not mutate b.user.groups, user is shared across b and a! – borovsky Oct 5 '17 at 8:11
  • Here's a link to the docs describing what @borovsky mentioned. – Dillon Ryan Redding Aug 23 '18 at 19:54
4

The Object.assign() method is used to copy the values of all enumerable own properties from one or more source objects to a target object. It will return the target object.

assign method will make a new object by copying from the source object, the issue if you change any method later on in the source object it will not be reflected to the new object.

Use create()

The Object.create() method creates a new object with the specified prototype object and properties.

const b = Object.create(a)
b.user.groups = {}
// if you don't want the prototype link add this
// b.prototype = Object.prototype 

This way you have b linked to a via the prototype and if you make any changes in a it will be reflected in b, and any changes in b will not affect a

  • That is indeed an interesting point, but in this case I need to create a copy of the source. – philipp Jan 11 '17 at 11:45
  • Then your own answer is what you are looking for – Abdullah Alsigar Jan 11 '17 at 11:51
  • Or use create() and then do. b.prototype = Object.prototype – Abdullah Alsigar Jan 11 '17 at 12:06
3

You asked specifically for an ES6 way with Object.assign, but maybe someone else will prefer my more 'general' answer - you can do it easily with lodash, and personally I think that this solution is more readable.

import * as _ from 'lodash';
_.set(a, 'user.groups', newGroupsValue);

It mutates object.

  • 1
    Well of course, that's why I assumed that you would not like to use my solution but someone else with similar problem might find it useful. – Patryk Wlaź May 19 '17 at 11:02
1

Small fine tune of phillips first answer.

const object1 = {
  abc: {
    a: 1
  }
};

const object2 = {
  abc: {
    b: 2
  }
};

Object.assign(object1, {
    abc: {
        ...object1.abc,
        ...object2.abc
    }
});

console.log(object1);
// Object { abc: Object { a: 1, b: 2 } }
1

Here's a small function called Object_assign (just replace the . with a _ if you need nested assigning)

The function sets all target values by either pasting the source value in there directly, or by recursively calling Object_assign again when both the target value and source value are non-null objects.

const target = {
  a: { x: 0 },
  b: { y: { m: 0, n: 1      } },
  c: { z: { i: 0, j: 1      } },
  d: null
}

const source1 = {
  a: {},
  b: { y: {       n: 0      } },
  e: null
}

const source2 = {
  c: { z: {            k: 2 } },
  d: {}
}

function Object_assign (target, ...sources) {
  sources.forEach(source => {
    Object.keys(source).forEach(key => {
      const s_val = source[key]
      const t_val = target[key]
      target[key] = t_val && s_val && typeof t_val === 'object' && typeof s_val === 'object'
                  ? Object_assign(t_val, s_val)
                  : s_val
    })
  })
  return target
}

console.log(Object_assign(Object.create(target), source1, source2))

-1

More general solution below. It makes recursively assigning only if there are conflicts (same key names). It resolves issues assigning complex objects, which has many reference points. For example, nested-object-assign, an existing package for nested object assign in npm, stuck with complex objects assign because it recursively goes through all keys.

var objecttarget = {
  a: 'somestring',
  b: {x:2,y:{k:1,l:1},z:{j:3,l:4}},
  c: false
};

var objectsource = {
  a: 'somestring else',
  b: {k:1,x:2,y:{k:2,p:1},z:{}},
  c: true
};

function nestedassign(target, source) {
  Object.keys(source).forEach(sourcekey=>{
    if (Object.keys(source).find(targetkey=>targetkey===sourcekey) !== undefined && typeof source[sourcekey] === "object") {
      target[sourcekey]=nestedassign(target[sourcekey],source[sourcekey]);
    } else {
      target[sourcekey]=source[sourcekey];
    }
  });
  return target;
}

// It will lose objecttarget.b.y.l and objecttarget.b.z
console.log(Object.assign(Object.create(objecttarget),objectsource));

// Improved object assign
console.log(nestedassign(Object.create(objecttarget),objectsource));

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