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I have this variable assignment:

var a = 2 + 2;

The value of a will be 4. But I don't want it to immediately evaluate the 2 + 2 expression. How do I make the variable stay as 2 + 2 and not change to 4 until the program gets to the line where I command for a to be evaluated?

2 + 2 isn't a good example of why I would actually want to do this, so here's a very simple example of a situation in which I would need a variable to not evaluate until I want it to:

var a = (c > d); // and stay as an unevaluated condition
function b() {
    var c = 5;
    var d = 3;
    // evaluate B here
    return b;
}

If a is parsed as soon as it's assigned, there will be an undefined variable error because c and d are not defined. I want to delay the evaluation of the condition until I want to use it (at the line that says evaluate B here). How do I do that?

  • 6
    a should be a function, not a variable if you want to delay evaluation – juvian Jan 11 '17 at 14:02
  • function a() = { return c > d; };, then if (a()) ... Although if a isn't used anywhere else, why even have that assignment outside the function in the first place...? – Chris G Jan 11 '17 at 14:03
  • do you need the global variable a? btw, c and d are not declared in the scope of a. – Nina Scholz Jan 11 '17 at 14:11
  • it will not run because c & d is not defined in your global a. Right and Wrong – KiRa Jan 17 '17 at 5:26
  • Please do not drastically change your posts. See How much change to the question is too much? – Bhargav Rao Jul 15 '18 at 9:14
22
+50

This question is just about delaying the evaluation of a condition until it's used

Alright. A few people have mentioned this in the comments already. The standard way to delay a computation in JavaScript is to make the computation a function that you then call when you need it. Easy to implement, easy to understand, no surprises.

Here we go, this delays the evaluation of the condition until it is used:

function a(c, d) {
  return c > d;
}

function b() {
  var c = 5;
  var d = 3;
  if (a(c, d)) {
    alert("a");
    return true;
  } else {
    alert("b");
    return false;
  }
}

b();
1

In your example, the variables c and d are not defined in the global scope;

You need either to make them global or to pass them as parameters of your b funciton.

For delaying the evaluation, you can just use an intermediary function (named evaluateA in the code snippet below):

    var a, c, d;
    
    function evaluateA(){
       return c > d;
    };
    
    console.log(a); // undefined
    
    function b() {
    	c = 2;
    	d = 1;
        return evaluateA();
    }
    
    console.log(b()); // true

1

You could use Object.defineProperty to create a, but unless function b sets c and d in the global scope, a will not be able to evaluate them.

Object.defineProperty(window, 'a', {
  get: function() {
    return c > d;
  }
})

function b() {
  c = 5; // must use global scope or this will fail
  d = 3; // must use global scope or this will fail
  return a; // true
}

1

I can only think of this. You assign "a" the result of the function "eval_a"

// nevaluated condition (function)
function eval_a(c,d){
    return c > d;
};

// evaluate
a=eval_a(5,3);
alert(a);

// evaluate again
a=eval_a(1,10);
alert(a);

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