4

my simplified data looks like this:

set.seed(1453); x = sample(0:1, 10, TRUE)
date = c('2016-01-01', '2016-01-05', '2016-01-07',  '2016-01-12',  '2016-01-16',  '2016-01-20',
             '2016-01-20',  '2016-01-25',  '2016-01-26',  '2016-01-31')


df = data.frame(x, date = as.Date(date))


df 
x       date
1 2016-01-01
0 2016-01-05
1 2016-01-07
0 2016-01-12
0 2016-01-16
1 2016-01-20
1 2016-01-20
0 2016-01-25
0 2016-01-26
1 2016-01-31

I'd like to calculate the number of occurrences for x == 1 within a specified time period, e.g. 14 and 30 days from the current date (but excluding the current entry, if it is x == 1. The desired output would look like this:

solution
x       date x_plus14 x_plus30
1 2016-01-01        1        3
0 2016-01-05        1        4
1 2016-01-07        2        3
0 2016-01-12        2        3
0 2016-01-16        2        3
1 2016-01-20        2        2
1 2016-01-20        1        1
0 2016-01-25        1        1
0 2016-01-26        1        1
1 2016-01-31        0        0

Ideally, I'd like this to be in dplyr, but it is not a must. Any ideas how to achieve this? Thanks a lot for your help!

  • 1
    Two things. 1) Try not to name objects after functions (sample is also a function). 2) It's unclear what you are asking – Sotos Jan 11 '17 at 14:38
  • do you need today + 14 observations (rows) or today + 14 days? the latter is much more complicated. – ℕʘʘḆḽḘ Jan 11 '17 at 14:40
  • is your output correct? bcoz x_plus14[1] should be 2 – joel.wilson Jan 11 '17 at 14:50
  • Not sure where is as_date from but you could simply do sample = data.frame(x, date = as.Date(date)) while both avoiding a dependency and converting to matrix and back using cbind – David Arenburg Jan 11 '17 at 14:51
  • thanks all for useful comments. @Sotos: now I've changed df names – Kasia Kulma Jan 11 '17 at 16:02
5

Adding another approach based on findInterval:

cs = cumsum(df$x) # cumulative number of occurences
data.frame(df, 
           plus14 = cs[findInterval(df$date + 14, df$date, left.open = TRUE)] - cs, 
           plus30 = cs[findInterval(df$date + 30, df$date, left.open = TRUE)] - cs)
#   x       date plus14 plus30
#1  1 2016-01-01      1      3
#2  0 2016-01-05      1      4
#3  1 2016-01-07      2      3
#4  0 2016-01-12      2      3
#5  0 2016-01-16      2      3
#6  1 2016-01-20      2      2
#7  1 2016-01-20      1      1
#8  0 2016-01-25      1      1
#9  0 2016-01-26      1      1
#10 1 2016-01-31      0      0
  • thanks, @alexis_laz for your answer and help (again)! I really like how simple and elegant it is and it is based on base R. Thanks a million! – Kasia Kulma Jan 12 '17 at 9:23
  • @KasiaKulma : You're welcome. findInterval is, indeed, handy on such situtations and it, also, avoids comparing all dates with all dates to return the number of entries < from a specific date. Have a nice day! – alexis_laz Jan 12 '17 at 12:04
  • This is really elegant! – Kamil S Jaron Jan 18 '17 at 20:48
4

Earlier I wasn't including the present date and so numbers didn't match.

library(data.table)
setDT(df)[, `:=`(x14 = sum(df$x[between(df$date, date, date + 14, incbounds = FALSE)]), 
                 x30 = sum(df$x[between(df$date, date, date + 30, incbounds = FALSE)])),
              by = date]

#     x       date x14 x30
#  1: 1 2016-01-01   1   3
#  2: 0 2016-01-05   1   4
#  3: 1 2016-01-07   2   3
#  4: 0 2016-01-12   2   3
#  5: 0 2016-01-16   2   3
#  6: 1 2016-01-20   1   1
#  7: 1 2016-01-20   1   1
#  8: 0 2016-01-25   1   1
#  9: 0 2016-01-26   1   1
# 10: 1 2016-01-31   0   0

Or a general solution that will work for any desired range

vec <- c(14, 30) # Specify desired ranges
setDT(df)[, paste0("x", vec) := 
            lapply(vec, function(i) sum(df$x[between(df$date, 
                                                     date, 
                                                     date + i, 
                                                     incbounds = FALSE)])),
            by = date]
  • got the issue!! I was including the present date. Just have date+1 instead of date in between() – joel.wilson Jan 11 '17 at 15:13
  • @KasiaKulma need to clarify on whether to include the current date or not though she has mentioned in the question. Because the number didn't match for the first row – joel.wilson Jan 11 '17 at 15:38
  • thanks for that; and yes, now I edited the post so that it clarifies that the current occurrence, if it is `x==1' should not be included in the calculation. I would not mess with dates, though, as in my original dataset you can find multiple occurrences with the same date, so I can always extract 1 if the solution includes the current record – Kasia Kulma Jan 11 '17 at 16:06
  • In order to get the desired result in both lines just specify incbounds = FALSE and leave the original ranges, for instance between(sample$date, date, date+30, incbounds = FALSE) (this will have 3 instead of 4 in the first line) – David Arenburg Jan 11 '17 at 16:16
  • 1
    @DavidArenburg thank you for the update!!! really thanks a lot! – joel.wilson Jan 11 '17 at 20:12
2

Here's my stab at it with some dplyr+purrr help. I got slightly different counts due to the <= and >= in the helper function x_next() if you adjust them properly i think you should be able to get what you want. hth.

library("tidyverse")
library("lubridate")
set.seed(1453)

x = sample(0:1, 10, TRUE)
dates = c('2016-01-01', '2016-01-05', '2016-01-07',  '2016-01-12',  '2016-01-16',  '2016-01-20',
         '2016-01-20',  '2016-01-25',  '2016-01-26',  '2016-01-31')

df = data_frame(x = x, dates = lubridate::as_date(dates))

# helper function to calculate the sum of xs in the next days_in_future
x_next <- function(d, days_in_future) {

  df %>% 
    # subset on days of interest
    filter(dates > d & dates <= d + days(days_in_future)) %>% 
    # sum up xs
    summarise(sum = sum(x)) %>% 
    # have to unlist them so that the (following) call to mutate works
    unlist(use.names=F)
  }

# mutate your df
df %>% 
  mutate(xplus14 = map(dates, x_next, 14),
         xplus30 = map(dates, x_next, 30))
  • I don't think you are taking into account that x should be 1. Also, you should be using map_dbl. – Axeman Jan 11 '17 at 15:31
  • hey @Axeman, don't understand why the downvote...i am taking what you said into account - sum(x) will obviously sum over all x=1 only. using map_dbl is a choice but in this case not a wrong one... – davidski Jan 11 '17 at 16:31
  • Sorry, I missed the sum(x). But you are still getting counts that are too high? – Axeman Jan 11 '17 at 16:33
  • no worries but there's no way to undo a downvote right?as for the results - i will edit my answer with a strict inequality on the right side and i think it should be correct. note that the original question has a mistake in the example output (row 1 for x_plus14 is actually 2 if you look at the data). – davidski Jan 11 '17 at 16:42
  • update: just re-read all the comments and the desired solution seems to exclude the current date. i updated my answer and now i get the same results as your proposal. imo (and its just a matter of taste) - extracting the anonymous function separately lets you re-use it more often without copy-pasting code. – davidski Jan 11 '17 at 16:52
2

A concise dplyr and purrr solution:

library(tidyverse)

sample %>% 
  mutate(x_plus14 = map(date, ~sum(x == 1 & between(date, . + 1, . + 14))),
         x_plus30 = map(date, ~sum(x == 1 & between(date, . + 1, . + 30))))
   x       date x_plus14 x_plus30
1  1 2016-01-01        1        4
2  0 2016-01-05        1        4
3  1 2016-01-07        2        3
4  0 2016-01-12        2        3
5  0 2016-01-16        2        3
6  1 2016-01-20        1        1
7  1 2016-01-20        1        1
8  0 2016-01-25        1        1
9  0 2016-01-26        1        1
10 1 2016-01-31        0        0
  • thanks, @Axeman, for that, I really like clarity and compactness of your solution. However, I don't understand why your (and other) solution gives x_plus14 == 1 and gives x_plus30 == 1 at row 6, as from then to the end of the month there are 2 x == 1 occurrences (excluding the current one). It's even more surprising that all the other instances have been calculated correctly! – Kasia Kulma Jan 11 '17 at 15:58
  • It's because of the duplicate dates in rows 6 and 7. You can use between(sample$date, ., . + 14) but then the dates themselves will also be included, and we end up with 3. – Axeman Jan 11 '17 at 16:02
  • that's fine, I can always extract 1 from it. If you edit your answer this way, I'll happily accept it – Kasia Kulma Jan 11 '17 at 16:07
  • I realised this approach gives me inconsistent results, depending wether the entry is x==1 or `x==0'. Any ideas how to get around it? – Kasia Kulma Jan 11 '17 at 16:22
1

As other already mentioned, it is strange that you do not count the day from and you should avoid naming objects by names of functions (sample). However, the code bellow reproduce your desired output:

set.seed(1453); 
x = sample(0:1, 10, TRUE)
date = c('2016-01-01', '2016-01-05', '2016-01-07',  '2016-01-12',  '2016-01-16',  '2016-01-20',
             '2016-01-20',  '2016-01-25',  '2016-01-26',  '2016-01-31')


sample = data.frame(x = x, date = as.Date(sample$date))

getOccurences <- function(one_row, sample_data, date_range){
  one_date <- as.Date(one_row[2])
  sum(sample$x[sample_data$date > one_date & 
               sample_data$date < one_date + date_range])
}

sample$x_plus14 <- apply(sample,1,getOccurences, sample, 14)
sample$x_plus30 <- apply(sample,1,getOccurences, sample, 30)

sample

   x       date x_plus14 x_plus30
1  1 2016-01-01        1        3
2  0 2016-01-05        1        4
3  1 2016-01-07        2        3
4  0 2016-01-12        2        3
5  0 2016-01-16        2        3
6  1 2016-01-20        1        1
7  1 2016-01-20        1        1
8  0 2016-01-25        1        1
9  0 2016-01-26        1        1
10 1 2016-01-31        0        0

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