22

I'm having trouble finding a good example in encrypting / decrypting strings in C# using a certificate. I was able to find and implement an example of signing and validating a signature, as shown below. Could someone point me to an easy, similar example for encryption?

private static string Sign(RSACryptoServiceProvider privateKey, string content)
{
    SHA1Managed sha1 = new SHA1Managed();
    UnicodeEncoding  encoding = new UnicodeEncoding ();
    byte[] data = encoding.GetBytes(content);
    byte[] hash = sha1.ComputeHash(data);

    // Sign the hash
    var signature = privateKey.SignHash(hash, CryptoConfig.MapNameToOID("SHA1"));
    return Convert.ToBase64String(signature);
}

public static bool Verify(RSACryptoServiceProvider publicKey, string content, string hashString)
{
    SHA1Managed sha1 = new SHA1Managed();
    UnicodeEncoding  encoding = new UnicodeEncoding ();
    byte[] data = encoding.GetBytes(content);
    byte[] hash = sha1.ComputeHash(data);
    return publicKey.VerifyHash(hash, CryptoConfig.MapNameToOID("SHA1"), Convert.FromBase64String(hashString));
}
5
  • Are you asking how to load a certificate for use with RSA or do you have a RSACryptoServiceProvider already loaded with the key from the cert?
    – Alex K.
    Jan 11, 2017 at 15:36
  • Have you seen this related post? Jan 11, 2017 at 15:38
  • Note you would/can only ever use RSA to encrypt small amounts of data rather than arbitrary lengths of text.
    – Alex K.
    Jan 11, 2017 at 15:38
  • I already have an RSACryptoServiceProvider loaded with private/public keys. From some research it's my understanding that I would need to do the faster, symmetric encryption to encrypt the data and then the slower, asymmetric encryption using the certificate to encrypt the key. What I'm having trouble with is weaving all the online examples together into an encrypt/decrypt function like for signing.
    – Ilya
    Jan 11, 2017 at 15:57
  • See if this helps: docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/api/…
    – neo
    Aug 10, 2020 at 19:12

1 Answer 1

32

Per the .NET Framework team's guidance (have to search for "Cryptography Updates", there doesn't seem to be an anchor nearby -- or, just look at the code samples).

public static byte[] EncryptDataOaepSha1(X509Certificate2 cert, byte[] data)
{
    // GetRSAPublicKey returns an object with an independent lifetime, so it should be
    // handled via a using statement.
    using (RSA rsa = cert.GetRSAPublicKey())
    {
        // OAEP allows for multiple hashing algorithms, what was formermly just "OAEP" is
        // now OAEP-SHA1.
        return rsa.Encrypt(data, RSAEncryptionPadding.OaepSHA1);
    }
}

Decrypt would thus be

public static byte[] DecryptDataOaepSha1(X509Certificate2 cert, byte[] data)
{
    // GetRSAPrivateKey returns an object with an independent lifetime, so it should be
    // handled via a using statement.
    using (RSA rsa = cert.GetRSAPrivateKey())
    {
        return rsa.Decrypt(data, RSAEncryptionPadding.OaepSHA1);
    }
}

Caveats:

  • RSA.Encrypt(byte[], RSAEncryptionPadding) was added in .NET Framework 4.6 (and .NET Core 1.0 / .NET Standard 1.3), so make sure you are building a project with a high enough target version.
  • RSA encryption is mainly used to encrypt symmetric keys, not actual data payloads, because it is expensive and has a size limit (always lower than the keysize (in bytes), the different padding modes consume different amounts of available space).
  • While the RSA base class talks about OaepSHA256 (etc) only Pkcs1 and OaepSHA1 are supported by all providers in .NET Core. (OaepSHA256+ is limited to RSACng)
8
  • Thank for the reply, but I'm having trouble getting it to work. I have the signing example working and when I perform the original signing it prompts me for CAC PIN number and everything works. In your example, encrypting for some reason doesn't prompt me for a PIN even though I'm using the private key, I would think that it should. Anyway, when decrypting, I get a "Key does not exist" exception. Any ideas?
    – Ilya
    Jan 11, 2017 at 16:21
  • 2
    @Ilya Encrypting doesn't use the private key, so even if you have a private key (capable) key handle the key provider may be willing to do the operation without a PIN prompt. And... I see that the public/private parts are backwards in the sample. Eep. Updating my answer :)
    – bartonjs
    Jan 11, 2017 at 17:08
  • I guess it would be find for it to not prompt for pin, because the private key is encoded on the CAC, so if the CAC is not present there's no way to decrypt. I swapped the code as in your updated example but now on the decrypt I get "Bad key" error.
    – Ilya
    Jan 11, 2017 at 18:32
  • 1
    So to recap: Encrypt using GetRSAPublicKey() then Decrypt using GetRSAPrivateKey() = "Bad Key" on decrypt. Encrypt using GetRSAPrivateKey() then Decrypt using GetRSAPublicKey() = "Key does not exist." on decrypt.
    – Ilya
    Jan 11, 2017 at 18:35
  • 1
    Are you getting the Bad Key error when calling Decrypt using the RSACryptoServiceProvider object you already had working? If Sign works, but Decrypt doesn't, that could be a permissions setting in the private key (that it was created as signature only).
    – bartonjs
    Jan 11, 2017 at 18:38

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