59

Right now, I catch the exception in the except Exception: clause, and do print(exception). The result provides no information since it always prints <class 'Exception'>. I knew this used to work in python 2, but how do I do it in python3?

1
  • 1
    This doesn't make sense, what is bound to the name exception exactly? Please post the snippet where this behavior appears and most importanly the part where the name exception is initialized. – Dimitris Fasarakis Hilliard Jan 11 '17 at 17:48
99

I'm guessing that you need to assign the Exception to a variable. As shown in the Python 3 tutorial:

def fails():
    x = 1 / 0

try:
    fails()
except Exception as ex:
    print(ex)

To give a brief explanation, as is a pseudo-assignment keyword used in certain compound statements to assign or alias the preceding statement to a variable.

In this case, as assigns the caught exception to a variable allowing for information about the exception to stored and used later, instead of needing to be dealt with immediately. (This is discussed in detail in the Python 3 Language Reference: The try Statement.)


The other compound statement using as is the with statement:

@contextmanager
def opening(filename):
    f = open(filename)
    try:
        yield f
    finally:
        f.close()

with opening(filename) as f:
    # ...read data from f...

Here, with statements are used to wrap the execution of a block with methods defined by context managers. This functions like an extended try...except...finally statement in a neat generator package, and the as statement assigns the generator-produced result from the context manager to a variable for extended use. (This is discussed in detail in the Python 3 Language Reference: The with Statement.)


Finally, as can be used when importing modules, to alias a module to a different (usually shorter) name:

import foo.bar.baz as fbb

This is discussed in detail in the Python 3 Language Reference: The import Statement.

30

These are the changes since python 2:

    try:
        1 / 0
    except Exception as e: # (as opposed to except Exception, e:)
                           # ^ that will just look for two classes, Exception and e
        # for the repr
        print(repr(e))
        # for just the message, or str(e), since print calls str under the hood
        print(e)
        # the arguments that the exception has been called with. 
        # the first one is usually the message. (OSError is different, though)
        print(e.args)

You can look into the standard library module traceback for fancier stuff.

2
  • 4
    Python 3 has no message attribute, it seems, and str(e) prepends the location and type of the error to the message; correct? – orome Apr 19 '19 at 19:00
  • 2
    maybe late, but just for clearance... str(e) appear to return just the message in python 3, ie: 'name 're' is not defined' – webbi Aug 15 '19 at 18:23
14

Try

try:
    print undefined_var
except Exception as e:
    print(e)

this will print the representation given by e.__str__():

"name 'undefined_var' is not defined"

you can also use:

print(repr(e))

which will include the Exception class name:

"NameError("name 'undefined_var' is not defined",)"

5

Here is the way I like that prints out all of the error stack.

import logging

try:
    1 / 0
except Exception as _e:
    # any one of the follows:
    # print(logging.traceback.format_exc())
    logging.error(logging.traceback.format_exc())

The output looks as the follows:

ERROR:root:Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/PATH-TO-YOUR/filename.py", line 4, in <module>
    1 / 0
ZeroDivisionError: division by zero

LOGGING_FORMAT :

LOGGING_FORMAT = '%(asctime)s\n  File "%(pathname)s", line %(lineno)d\n  %(levelname)s [%(message)s]'
1

Although if you want a code that is compatible with both python2 and python3 you can use this:

import logging
try:
    1/0
except Exception as e:
    if hasattr(e, 'message'):
        logging.warning('python2')
        logging.error(e.message)
    else:
        logging.warning('python3')
        logging.error(e)
1

[In Python3]

Let's say you want to handle an IndexError and print the traceback, you can do the following:

from traceback import print_tb 
empty_list = [] 
try: 
    x = empty_list[100]
except IndexError as index_error: 
    print_tb(index_error.__traceback__)

Note: You can use the format_tb function instead of print_tb to get the traceback as a string for logging purposes. Hope this helps.

0

I've use this :

except (socket.timeout, KeyboardInterrupt) as e:
    logging.debug("Exception : {}".format(str(e.__str__).split(" ")[3]))
    break

Let me know if it does not work for you !!

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.